Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Want to see how the EGG is made? Click to Watch

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #BigGreenEgg.

OT - What are you doing right now?

1235123522354235623572413

Comments

  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 1,733
    we fertilize corn with anhydrous ammonia , 2021 it was $575 a ton, next year they are guessing it will be between $1,200-$1,500 a ton

    My sugar going up 25% in 2022. Used to be able to book for a year, now they’re only allowing me to book for 3 months out. I use 2,000# a week on average 
  • I tried to pre pay for ammonia… not a option 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 8,724
    @CPFC1905 @eoin Thanks for the Herdman assist!
    canuckland
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 39,045
    Got my booster.  Need the flu still.
    ______________________________________________
    The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those that speak it.
    Free speech is my right to say what you don't want to hear.  --George Orwell
    Cancel culture is bad, m'kay!....cancel NOLA because he is mean to me! --Bob B !!!
    Oh yeah?! Well you're a (duuhhh durp) HIPPY CHIC (sic) --Lit


  • Got my booster, the flu and pneumonia (second) at the same time.  I don't recommend doing that in the future.
    XL and Small BGEs in South Carolina
  • I tried to pre pay for ammonia… not a option 
    Locally here they were locking in prices until December 31, then any prepay money is just credit against what it costs at delivery.  Lot of anhydrous went down the last couple weeks as guys had pre-payed in July/August at the <$1000/ton range.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 39,045

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    ______________________________________________
    The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those that speak it.
    Free speech is my right to say what you don't want to hear.  --George Orwell
    Cancel culture is bad, m'kay!....cancel NOLA because he is mean to me! --Bob B !!!
    Oh yeah?! Well you're a (duuhhh durp) HIPPY CHIC (sic) --Lit


  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 39,045
    (trolling is fun!)
    ______________________________________________
    The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those that speak it.
    Free speech is my right to say what you don't want to hear.  --George Orwell
    Cancel culture is bad, m'kay!....cancel NOLA because he is mean to me! --Bob B !!!
    Oh yeah?! Well you're a (duuhhh durp) HIPPY CHIC (sic) --Lit


  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 8,483
    edited November 2021
    Should last me a few cooks 

    Visalia, Ca

    LGBE- Pit's by Klose Trailer -Stumps XL Stretch - Custom Santa Maria-Modified HD Offset Smoker Reverse Flow- FatStack Smoker FS120 coming soon FatStack 500- Blackstone 36 Blackstone 22 - Custom Cold Smoke House and a lonely Brinkman Vertical Smoker
  • SGHSGH Posts: 28,308
    edited November 2021

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    I think they should go back to plowing. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought, in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 28,561
    edited November 2021

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )


    but what if i wanted to grow plankton in a 995 billion gallon tank to feed some fishes
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • EoinEoin Posts: 4,116

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    It's common here to plant a nitrogen fixer between wheat crops, direct drill into the remaining stubble.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 39,045
    Eoin said:

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    It's common here to plant a nitrogen fixer between wheat crops, direct drill into the remaining stubble.
    I think we have a resident expert here on a big category of nitrogen fixing bean crops.... @Legume ?

    ______________________________________________
    The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those that speak it.
    Free speech is my right to say what you don't want to hear.  --George Orwell
    Cancel culture is bad, m'kay!....cancel NOLA because he is mean to me! --Bob B !!!
    Oh yeah?! Well you're a (duuhhh durp) HIPPY CHIC (sic) --Lit


  • I tried to pre pay for ammonia… not a option 
    Locally here they were locking in prices until December 31, then any prepay money is just credit against what it costs at delivery.  Lot of anhydrous went down the last couple weeks as guys had pre-payed in July/August at the <$1000/ton range.
    I’ve never tried fall application of Anhydrous, I’m chicken I guess but stability is a concern and if we have a disaster spring, being able to get the corn planted where you planning on putting it maybe a challenge.  As far as the price of fertilizer I’ll just eat it. It’s always something in farming. Smart money probably has 28 in tanks on the farm ready for the spring
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • Eoin said:

    Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    It's common here to plant a nitrogen fixer between wheat crops, direct drill into the remaining stubble.
    I think we have a resident expert here on a big category of nitrogen fixing bean crops.... @Legume ?


    Don’t forget @PigBeanUs. I understand he farms beans in the U.S. And pigs too. 
  • SGHSGH Posts: 28,308
    Scored 2 boxes of 22-250 ammo today. It’s the only 2 boxes I have seen on the shelves in a year and a half. I wish they would of had 200 boxes. 


    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought, in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 39,045
    Ammonia production is pegged to the cost of natural gas.  The global price for LNG has shot up between 250-400%, which has caused the price of ammonia to skyrocket.  This happened before as recently as 2018.
    ______________________________________________
    The further a society drifts from the truth the more it will hate those that speak it.
    Free speech is my right to say what you don't want to hear.  --George Orwell
    Cancel culture is bad, m'kay!....cancel NOLA because he is mean to me! --Bob B !!!
    Oh yeah?! Well you're a (duuhhh durp) HIPPY CHIC (sic) --Lit


  • This!  Got home made chicken tenders in the oven and eggplant parm. Gonna be a good dinner
  • **** why is the pic sidways?

  • SGHSGH Posts: 28,308
    **** why is the pic sidways?

    The sideways pics started around a year ago. I still have no idea why they started turning sideways. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought, in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 

  • Ozzie_IsaacOzzie_Isaac Posts: 12,837
    SGH said:
    **** why is the pic sidways?

    The sideways pics started around a year ago. I still have no idea why they started turning sideways. 
    @Botch had a slow loading internet connection.  He got the Buffalo to fix that, but they broke the rest.
    If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing.

    Some Eggs, some Weber stuff, the occasional Traeger, and various other things that make flames and hold coals.
  • @ValleyGirl

    Don’t spill that nectar on your laptop! Don’t ask how I know not to do that. 
  • Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )


     Get a haircut.
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • Ammonia production is pegged to the cost of natural gas.  The global price for LNG has shot up between 250-400%, which has caused the price of ammonia to skyrocket.  This happened before as recently as 2018.

    Pegged is a strong word, unless natural gas has doubled in 6 months, I am pretty sure they are just sticking it to farmers because......... they can.  Crop prices are up and everyone has their hand out.
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • Understanding the relationship between nitrogen (N) and crop rotation is very important when making N management decisions. There are several benefits to using crop rotation, including improved nutrient cycling, soil tilth, and soil physical properties; and enhanced weed control. Crop rotation also may influence the rate of N mineralization or the conversion of organic N to mineral N by modifying soil moisture, soil temperature, pH, plant residue, and tillage practices.

    The incremental increase in N use over the past five decades, due to emphasis on maximizing yield, has led to a subsequent increase in N in the soil profile of some agricultural fields. Therefore, the influence of agricultural practices on water quality has prompted studies to develop best management practices to optimize the use of fertilizer N and reduce N loss to surface and groundwater. Crop rotation can play a major role in minimizing the potential risk of nitrate leaching to surface and groundwater by enhancing soil N availability, reducing the amount of N fertilizer applied, and minimizing the potential risk of N leaching.

    Research on the impact of long-term crop rotation on soil N availability shows that planting alfalfa, corn, oat, and soybean significantly increased the mineralized net N in soil compared with planting continuous corn. Because soil N mineralization can effect yield, crop rotation thus can be used as a management system to enhance the soil nutrient pool, thereby reducing the fertilizer N input and minimizing the risk of leaching of excess N during wet weather.

    A combination of conservation tillage practices and crop rotation has been shown to be very effective in improving soil physical properties. Long-term studies in the Midwest indicate that corn-soybean rotation improves yield potential of no-till compared with continuous corn. The reduction in yield of continuous corn in no-till is attributed to low soil temperature during seed germination, which is evident on poorly drained soils under no-till. Studies show that the poor performance of no-till corn following corn is more likely due to the previous crop than to surface residue conditions preventing early-season warming and drying of soils.

    The use of a legume cover in crop rotation can provide a substantial amount of N to a succeeding crop. Research has indicated that seeding rates for legumes can be reduced by approximately one-third of that recommended for forage production when used as cover crops without sacrificing biomass or N accumulation. Also, the type of crop grown in the previous year can impact the efficiency of conservation tillage, especially for no-till systems, due to the kind and amount of crop residue from the previous crop.

     (from https://crops.extension.iastate.edu/encyclopedia/value-crop-rotation-nitrogen-management )

    “Did someone say aNus?” - Scottie, probably 
    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    Ruining the forum, one post at a time.  

    Living large in the 919
  • WeberWhoWeberWho Posts: 9,559
    Anyone hungry for some delicious 3d printed vegetarian steak?


    Me neither. 
    "The pig is an amazing animal. You feed a pig an apple and it makes bacon. Let's see Michael Phelps do that" - Jim Gaffigan

    Minnesota
  • SGHSGH Posts: 28,308
    Just ordered a new pair of barn boots and some fresh overalls 👍

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought, in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 

  • WeberWho said:
    Anyone hungry for some delicious 3d printed vegetarian steak?


    Me neither. 
    It's funny but in that recent Marc Maron podcast with David Chang, David mentioned trying some synthetic meat that was really good and that he said he couldn't tell the difference from the real thing.  

    He might also talk about it on his new show that's on Hulu, I'm not sure.  
    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    Ruining the forum, one post at a time.  

    Living large in the 919
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.