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Chicken Gyros

smokingalsmokingal Posts: 1,025
edited March 2019 in EggHead Forum

With this latest cook, I wanted to make gyros out of chicken which resembled what I’ve made
in the past with beef and lamb mixtures.  This required an addition of fat to add moisture
and to help the ground meat stick together.  I chose to use beef marrow for this purpose, along with other ingredients that I already had on hand - chicken breasts, minced and drained
onions, minced garlic, garlic and onion powders, salt-free Cavender’s, Herbs de Provence,
sumac and sodium free chicken broth.

Everything got pureed in a food processor until it wound up as a fairly wet paste, which was rolled into as cylindrical a shape as I could manage, partially frozen, skewered, then fully frozen.

 

 

The Egg was dialed in at 275F, using oak and olive wood chunks.

I was worried that the high moisture content would prevent this vertical log from cooking in a
cohesive manner.  I was right.  About 2 hours in, I decided to take a peek.

 

 

Soooooooo.  Yeeaaahhh.  Not what I was shooting for.  No worries.  I had some 96 hour dough
that I needed to put to use and the flavor of the meat glob was outstanding.  I crafted a pizza
using the failed gyro log, tomatoes, sweet onions, parmesan, ricotta and fresh mozzarella cheeses.

 

 

It was hard to be too disappointed with how the meat turned out when the pizza turned out so
well.  However, I hadn’t given up just yet and determined what needed to change for my second attempt.  I used ground chicken breast and meat glue for the next effort, keeping everything else about the approach the same.

 

 

Two hours into the cook and so far so good.

 

 

All done with a much better outcome.

 

 

The chicken was sliced and lightly fried to give it some color.  Duck fat was
heated up for fries.

 

 

The chicken gyro was served with homemade tzatziki sauce and all the usual toppings, lettuce
onions, tomatoes and feta cheese.

 

 

The meat was tender, juicy and well seasoned and made for a nice little meal.  Definitely a
change of pace from the usual.

 

For dessert, I decided upon apple baklava.  The plan was to temper the usual heavy handed
sweetness of this dish with tart apples, along with a reduced amount of honey and sugar in the
syrup.  The syrup was made first, using no-sugar-added apple juice concentrate and 3 ounces
each of clover honey and granulated sugar, along with a cup of water.  This was reduced by a
third, until it was thickened.  A tablespoon of lemon juice was added and 2 cinnamon sticks
were tossed in to steep as the mixture cooled.

 

 

Ghee seasoned with Himalayan pink salt was heated on the Egg, along with chunks of Gala
apples which had been seasoned with cinnamon, nutmeg, allspice, cloves and ginger, then
covered in the remaining apple juice concentrate.  Once the apples had softened, they were
cooked further on the stovetop until tender and the liquid was reduced.

 

 

The walnut portion of the filling included Biscoff cookies and some granulated sugar that was
quickly pulsed in a food processor.  This was seasoned with cinnamon, nutmeg and allspice.

 

 

With everything prepped and ready, I started the tedious phyllo dough layering process, placing the apple layers towards the center of the dish, and heavily basting each dough layer with ghee.

 

 

The baklava was baked at 350F for an hour.  Once done, the completely cooled honey apple
syrup was poured over and it was left to rest overnight for thorough saturation.

 

 

Finally time to snack on a piece.

 

 

The all-brown filling makes it hard to see the layers, so here’s a quick shot of a corner end
piece.

 

 

Using tart apples and small amounts of honey and sugar in this batch allowed for a real balance of flavors which are often muted by the overwhelming sweetness of this dessert.  The tart flavor helped to showcase the blend of spices.  The best description of this is a buttery, walnut filled baklava that was combined with an apple pie and a spice cookie crust.  Sticky, sweet good eats.

It's "Smokin Gal", not "Smoking Al".
Egging in the Atlanta GA region
Large BGE, CGS setup, Kick Ash Basket, Smokeware SS Cap,
Arteflame grill grate

http://barbecueaddict.com
«1

Comments

  • Meat glue for the win!

    again, incredible cook start to finish. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • zahuliozahulio Posts: 127
    Wow! Such impressive work. I don't recall ever seeing chicken gyros before
  • keener75keener75 Posts: 148
    HOLY MACKINAW!
    St Marys, Ontario, Canada  LBGE
  • johnmitchelljohnmitchell Posts: 5,290
    Awesome as usual... One day could you show us a pic of your spice pantry..;) 
    Greensboro North Carolina
    When in doubt Accelerate....
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 9,597
    kewl
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 20,703
    Always impressive and a great initial audible.  What creativity and complete banquet right there.  Skills off the chart.  Congrats. 
    Louisville;  "indeterminate Jim" here; L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • chardchard Posts: 50
    Outstanding!
    Eggin' with a Large and Small
    Twin Cities, MN
  • HellrodKCHellrodKC Posts: 170
    Improvise, Adapt, Overcome.

    Well done!
  • johnnypjohnnyp Posts: 3,651
    very cool.  I'm going to have to give this a shot soon.

    Similar cook here- https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1177756/gyro-night#latest.   

    Looks like @DoubleEgger used foil for part of the cooking process for the structural support.
    XL & MM BGE, 36" Blackstone - Newport News, VA
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 16,303
    johnnyp said:
    very cool.  I'm going to have to give this a shot soon.

    Similar cook here- https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1177756/gyro-night#latest.   

    Looks like @DoubleEgger used foil for part of the cooking process for the structural support.
    Yes. I completely wrap in foil until the last 15-20 minutes. It browns fast. 
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 13,397
    I couldn't process this whole cook at one go. Had to stop as soon as I read about the beef marrow added in, because I was already drooling. And if that pizza was the rescue cook... wow.

    Bookmarked for the baklava itself. May have to come back and read all of this again during the week. Just superb!

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 15,782

    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    Living large in the 919


  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 7,318


    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • BGEChicagoBGEChicago Posts: 571
    @smokingal what a great post! I showed this to my 100% greek wife, guess what I'm cooking this weekend!!! Congrats on another fine cook!
    Chicago, IL BGE XL BGE Mini Webber Charcoal / Elmhurst, IL
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 12,742
    A little drive and ambition out of you would be nice for a change! 😜
  • CigarCityEggerCigarCityEgger Posts: 1,689


    Looks incredible, and a great audible with that pizza. Thanks for sharing!
  • HubHub Posts: 865
    Pics or it didn't happen ... oh wait! =)
    Beautiful and lovely Villa Rica, Georgia
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,307
    Interesting project. Never used meat glue as it just never sounded good to me. Not a fan of ground chicken either. But, you did interest me in chicken gyros so a little digging found this, solid chicken parts with a lovely char, sliced as if from a vertical spit roaster. Not sure how I'd do it on an egg, but I also have a kettle. I have to try this! Need a recipe for pocketless pita.

    Nice save with the pizza! =)

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 25,531
    Interesting project. Never used meat glue as it just never sounded good to me. Not a fan of ground chicken either. But, you did interest me in chicken gyros so a little digging found this, solid chicken parts with a lovely char, sliced as if from a vertical spit roaster. Not sure how I'd do it on an egg, but I also have a kettle. I have to try this! Need a recipe for pocketless pita.

    Nice save with the pizza! =)
    made a contraption years ago to attempt this with breasts and thighs,  found out that skewers were the way to go to get the dark crispy exterior verse juicy center.  did the skewers last weekend =)
  • smokingalsmokingal Posts: 1,025
    edited March 2019

    @CarolinaQ Meat glue is made from natural sources, doesn't impart any flavor to the meat mixture and is deactivated by most cooking techniques. I used ground chicken to imitate the type of beef & lamb gyro meat I grew up eating, which was basically a cone shaped, cylindrical blob of ground meat roasted on a vertical grill. Grinding the meat this way also allowed me to fully incorporate additional fat. In Greece, I've noticed that their gyro meat is cooked in a manner that I've always attributed to a shawarma, solid meat slices roasted vertically.

    It's not pocketless, but I like to use this recipe for pita bread.

    It's "Smokin Gal", not "Smoking Al".
    Egging in the Atlanta GA region
    Large BGE, CGS setup, Kick Ash Basket, Smokeware SS Cap,
    Arteflame grill grate

    http://barbecueaddict.com
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 32,344

    Not to mention meat glue (transglutaminase) is already and naturally found in most of the meat you eat. That's where it comes from. And added to the better, whole-muscle lunch meat. Since it is from meat, I believe they can call it a natural ingredient, or even "meat".

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 32,344

    Correction, commercially it is made from animals, in a round about way - the enzyme is produced by bacteria feeding on the animals.

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 19,726

    @Nola you transglutaminase dog you!

    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • WeberWhoWeberWho Posts: 7,882

    Holy H€ll everything looks like it's out of some fancy cookbook! That looks truly amazing.

    "The pig is an amazing animal. You feed a pig an apple and it makes bacon. Let's see Michael Phelps do that" - Jim Gaffigan

    Minnesota
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 6,070
    Bump @smokingal ....looking to see if you have a % of seasoning to weight of protein...............trying to engineer a Gyro Sausage with blended spices vs individual 

    Thanks in advance 
    Visalia, Ca
  • smokingalsmokingal Posts: 1,025
    lkapigian said:
    Bump @smokingal ....looking to see if you have a % of seasoning to weight of protein...............trying to engineer a Gyro Sausage with blended spices vs individual 

    Thanks in advance 
    Sorry, @lkapigian - I can't remember the last time I measured seasonings.  I think my measuring spoons are actually still in storage.  I do tend to go a bit lighter on herbs de provence, as a little goes a long way.  I just combine the spices per my taste, i.e. easy on the herbs de provence, very heavy on the garlic/onion and finely grind them using a spice grinder.  Once everything is well coated, I consider it well seasoned.
    It's "Smokin Gal", not "Smoking Al".
    Egging in the Atlanta GA region
    Large BGE, CGS setup, Kick Ash Basket, Smokeware SS Cap,
    Arteflame grill grate

    http://barbecueaddict.com
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 6,070
    smokingal said:
    lkapigian said:
    Bump @smokingal ....looking to see if you have a % of seasoning to weight of protein...............trying to engineer a Gyro Sausage with blended spices vs individual 

    Thanks in advance 
    Sorry, @lkapigian - I can't remember the last time I measured seasonings.  I think my measuring spoons are actually still in storage.  I do tend to go a bit lighter on herbs de provence, as a little goes a long way.  I just combine the spices per my taste, i.e. easy on the herbs de provence, very heavy on the garlic/onion and finely grind them using a spice grinder.  Once everything is well coated, I consider it well seasoned.
    No worries and thank you....sausage is really about the only thing I measure for repeatability and especially salt
    Visalia, Ca
  • smokingal said:
    lkapigian said:
    Bump @smokingal ....looking to see if you have a % of seasoning to weight of protein...............trying to engineer a Gyro Sausage with blended spices vs individual 

    Thanks in advance 
    Sorry, @lkapigian - I can't remember the last time I measured seasonings.  I think my measuring spoons are actually still in storage.  I do tend to go a bit lighter on herbs de provence, as a little goes a long way.  I just combine the spices per my taste, i.e. easy on the herbs de provence, very heavy on the garlic/onion and finely grind them using a spice grinder.  Once everything is well coated, I consider it well seasoned.
    You and @caliking would get along just fine. 

    “Masalawurst is a concept, not a recipe” 
    -Caliking 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 6,070
    smokingal said:
    lkapigian said:
    Bump @smokingal ....looking to see if you have a % of seasoning to weight of protein...............trying to engineer a Gyro Sausage with blended spices vs individual 

    Thanks in advance 
    Sorry, @lkapigian - I can't remember the last time I measured seasonings.  I think my measuring spoons are actually still in storage.  I do tend to go a bit lighter on herbs de provence, as a little goes a long way.  I just combine the spices per my taste, i.e. easy on the herbs de provence, very heavy on the garlic/onion and finely grind them using a spice grinder.  Once everything is well coated, I consider it well seasoned.
    You and @caliking would get along just fine. 

    “Masalawurst is a concept, not a recipe” 
    -Caliking 
    I'd really like to try that masalwurst 

    I'm finding its anywhere from .5 -2 grams of herb/spice to kg of meat , I'll try and break out the spices in each blend and see what happens 
    Visalia, Ca
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