Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Want to see how the EGG is made? Click to Watch

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #BigGreenEgg.

OT-What are you buying right now?

1147148150152153193

Comments

  • LegumeLegume Posts: 13,635
    If they are over the house I would, you know a ice storm will have it raining pine branches 
     Good point
    Sap.  It sucks on a vinyl cover.
  • EoinEoin Posts: 4,302
    This will be the view from the tub. Take some trees out or no?
    I'd take some out.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 30,853
    This will be the view from the tub. Take some trees out or no?

     those pine boring beatles on the coast have pretty much destroyed all my hard pines, surprised to see that many unaffected. must have taken down 30 last summer and now seeing trees die further up at camp
    .
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 5,580
    If they are over the house I would, you know a ice storm will have it raining pine branches 
    Nalaskanassasin said:
    If they are over the house I would, you know a ice storm will have it raining pine branches 
    Not to mention a tornado or hurricane would be laying the whole tree on the house. Thin 3 out of 4 and all within falling distance of the house.
  • frazzdaddyfrazzdaddy Posts: 2,613
    edited May 2020
    Thanks for the input guys all things to consider. I think I will thin some. I do like the pine needle carpet though.
    Xl bge ,LG bge, two 4' crusher cone fire pits. Weber Genisis gasser and 
    Two rusty Weber kettles. 

    Two Rivers Farm
    Moncure N.C.
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 2,599
    Just snagged a complete adjustable rig from CGS. Also got the half stone and grid combo
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 5,580
    Drfrazzdaddy said:
    Thanks for the input guys all things to consider. I think I will thin some. I do like the pine needle carpet though.
     Dry pine needles are very flammable.
  • alaskanassasinalaskanassasin Posts: 6,514
    @frazzdaddy I can still pop the hood on my truck and find pine straw. 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.

    "It’s very possible I’m doing it all wrong, haven’t watched any videos, but I’m happy with the ones I make."
      - @Legume

  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 4,088
    @frazzdaddy  I can offer some management advice. I live in the woods and have a hardwood wooded lot, so I speak from first hand experience. Please consider the following: If you take any down, be selective, and do not do it all at once. When you remove one tree, you are removing the wind break of another. When trees are tight like that and the winds come, the winds end up going more up and over the trees rather then through them. The trees on the outside of the grove and are exposed to the wind the most, are also the strongest because they have been exposed to the wind all their life. Leave those if you can. If you remove those, the next in line which were more protected are now exposed to forces they are not used to. If you do decide to remove any, thin from the inside out, and only remove a few at a time. Another thing to consider, leave a few dead ones standing if they are not a real hazard to life or property.  They are habitat for all kinds of critters.  Take out all the dead wood, now bugs, birds and other things go for the live trees if they are not already their first choice. (This is a real balancing act).  If not done properly,  you will have a quicker die off than if you left a few dead ones standing. 
    So in short, know your predominant wind/storm direction, be very selective, and take your time. It may take a day to remove them, but it can take decades to get them back like that.  Good luck. 
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------

    Caliking said:   Meat in bung is my favorite. 
  • frazzdaddyfrazzdaddy Posts: 2,613
    Sea2Ski said:
    @frazzdaddy  I can offer some management advice. I live in the woods and have a hardwood wooded lot, so I speak from first hand experience. Please consider the following: If you take any down, be selective, and do not do it all at once. When you remove one tree, you are removing the wind break of another. When trees are tight like that and the winds come, the winds end up going more up and over the trees rather then through them. The trees on the outside of the grove and are exposed to the wind the most, are also the strongest because they have been exposed to the wind all their life. Leave those if you can. If you remove those, the next in line which were more protected are now exposed to forces they are not used to. If you do decide to remove any, thin from the inside out, and only remove a few at a time. Another thing to consider, leave a few dead ones standing if they are not a real hazard to life or property.  They are habitat for all kinds of critters.  Take out all the dead wood, now bugs, birds and other things go for the live trees if they are not already their first choice. (This is a real balancing act).  If not done properly,  you will have a quicker die off than if you left a few dead ones standing. 
    So in short, know your predominant wind/storm direction, be very selective, and take your time. It may take a day to remove them, but it can take decades to get them back like that.  Good luck. 
    Good advice. It will be minimal.
    Xl bge ,LG bge, two 4' crusher cone fire pits. Weber Genisis gasser and 
    Two rusty Weber kettles. 

    Two Rivers Farm
    Moncure N.C.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 13,946
    I never expected to learn so much about pine trees, on a barbecue forum!  Thanks folks!   :)
    ____________________________________________

    "People think that I must be a very strange person.  This is not correct; I have the heart of a small boy. It is in a glass jar on my desk"

    - Stephen King

     

    Ogden, Utard  

  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 15,088
    Botch said:
    I never expected to learn so much about pine trees, on a barbecue forum!  Thanks folks!   :)
    Pine trees have shallow root systems and in S.C., where our soil is sandy.....one will come down with a good wind. So additional learning here is, never plant a pine tree. 
    Ellijay GA with a Medium & MiniMax

    Well, I married me a wife, she's been trouble all my life,
    Run me out in the cold rain and snow
  • alaskanassasinalaskanassasin Posts: 6,514
     The Loblolly pines I saw in NC were as tough as it gets, I cant think of any blowing over with the exception of a tornado and even then they just broke off.
     However they are limb dropping sons of guns, all the pine needles and limbs are at the top of the tree so they as they grow they constantly drop old limbs especially in icing conditions.
     You also have to contend with pine straw clogging you gutters and basically getting into everything, AC unit, piling on your roof and holding moisture etc. 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.

    "It’s very possible I’m doing it all wrong, haven’t watched any videos, but I’m happy with the ones I make."
      - @Legume

  • LitLit Posts: 9,053
     The Loblolly pines I saw in NC were as tough as it gets, I cant think of any blowing over with the exception of a tornado and even then they just broke off.
     However they are limb dropping sons of guns, all the pine needles and limbs are at the top of the tree so they as they grow they constantly drop old limbs especially in icing conditions.
     You also have to contend with pine straw clogging you gutters and basically getting into everything, AC unit, piling on your roof and holding moisture etc. 

    They fall in Georgia all the time too especially when they are not thinned. The smaller ones try to get sun so they stretch and you end up with a tall weak tree. 
  • alaskanassasinalaskanassasin Posts: 6,514
    Lit said:
     The Loblolly pines I saw in NC were as tough as it gets, I cant think of any blowing over with the exception of a tornado and even then they just broke off.
     However they are limb dropping sons of guns, all the pine needles and limbs are at the top of the tree so they as they grow they constantly drop old limbs especially in icing conditions.
     You also have to contend with pine straw clogging you gutters and basically getting into everything, AC unit, piling on your roof and holding moisture etc. 

    They fall in Georgia all the time too especially when they are not thinned. The smaller ones try to get sun so they stretch and you end up with a tall weak tree. 

     In RTP it is 99% red clay, is it the same in Georgia?
    South of Columbus, Ohio.

    "It’s very possible I’m doing it all wrong, haven’t watched any videos, but I’m happy with the ones I make."
      - @Legume

  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 16,847
    edited May 2020
    Lit said:
     The Loblolly pines I saw in NC were as tough as it gets, I cant think of any blowing over with the exception of a tornado and even then they just broke off.
     However they are limb dropping sons of guns, all the pine needles and limbs are at the top of the tree so they as they grow they constantly drop old limbs especially in icing conditions.
     You also have to contend with pine straw clogging you gutters and basically getting into everything, AC unit, piling on your roof and holding moisture etc. 

    They fall in Georgia all the time too especially when they are not thinned. The smaller ones try to get sun so they stretch and you end up with a tall weak tree. 

     In RTP it is 99% red clay, is it the same in Georgia?
    In parts of GA. There’s a distinct line that runs through middle Georgia up through Columbia SC and onward where the soil shifts from clay to sand 
  • WeberWhoWeberWho Posts: 10,480
    Turns out Aldi milk is just relabeled Kemps milk. The same milk from the same facility.  Which I guess isn't shocking. I'd imagine majority of their other products are name brands with their Aldi label on them.


    "The pig is an amazing animal. You feed a pig an apple and it makes bacon. Let's see Michael Phelps do that" - Jim Gaffigan

    Minnesota
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 2,599
    WeberWho said:
    Turns out Aldi milk is just relabeled Kemps milk. The same milk from the same facility.  Which I guess isn't shocking. I'd imagine majority of their other products are name brands with their Aldi label on them.


    This is true with most grocers items. Multiple brands under one manufacturer. Sliced white bread is the biggest. Louisiana has one corporate sliced bread bakery that has 3 separate facilities. 95% of every loaf of sliced bread here, regardless of label, is made in 1 of those 3 bakeries
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 30,853
    new mask


    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 30,853
    WeberWho said:
    Turns out Aldi milk is just relabeled Kemps milk. The same milk from the same facility.  Which I guess isn't shocking. I'd imagine majority of their other products are name brands with their Aldi label on them.



    aldis mayo is hellmans,  racer candybars are snickers
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • WeberWhoWeberWho Posts: 10,480
    WeberWho said:
    Turns out Aldi milk is just relabeled Kemps milk. The same milk from the same facility.  Which I guess isn't shocking. I'd imagine majority of their other products are name brands with their Aldi label on them.



    aldis mayo is hellmans,  racer candybars are snickers
    Thier generic Millville cereals like Frosted Flakes, Lucky Charms, Golden Grahams, Cinnamon Toast Crunch, etc are all made from General Mills.
    "The pig is an amazing animal. You feed a pig an apple and it makes bacon. Let's see Michael Phelps do that" - Jim Gaffigan

    Minnesota
  • EzraBrooksEzraBrooks Posts: 336
    The Wahl clippers I had on backorder from Amazon finally arrived.  A haircut has never felt so good after being 6 weeks overdue.
  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 5,972
    Actually bought it Friday, but just got it. Pretty sweet!



    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, PK Original, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • ColtsFan said:
    Actually bought it Friday, but just got it. Pretty sweet!



    You left it closed for the shot? What a tease. 
  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 5,972
    ColtsFan said:
    Actually bought it Friday, but just got it. Pretty sweet!



    You left it closed for the shot? What a tease. 


    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, PK Original, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • bucky925bucky925 Posts: 2,029
    ColtsFan said:
    Actually bought it Friday, but just got it. Pretty sweet!



    Just sent an email to @[email protected].  I'm a knife junkie.

    Be careful when following the masses. Sometimes the M is silent.

  • bucky925bucky925 Posts: 2,029
    A local vineyard started doing a pop up market each week.   I though I try the rib-eyes.

    Be careful when following the masses. Sometimes the M is silent.

  • dorfamidorfami Posts: 50
    The Roccbox I can get now, or the Ooni 16 on back order until late August. Hmmm. 
  • TTCTTC Posts: 1,035
    A new truck entrance to one of my warehouses. Replacing worn out concrete sections, making a new street cut, then a nice coat of asphalt. Be glad when it’s done. 

    XL BGE, Blackstone, Roccbox, Weber Gasser, Brown Water, Cigars --  Gallatin, TN

    2001 Mastercraft Maristar 230 VRS

    Ikon pass 

    Colorado in the winter and the Lake in the Summer
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.