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Tips on using the pizza stone

timgaunttimgaunt Posts: 4
I've had a pizza stone for a while but keep burning bits to it which is a pain. I've just done a clean burn so it's fresh and ready to go again and I was wondering if anyone had any tips on how to get the best from it?

Comments

  • UncleBillyUncleBilly Posts: 194
    Let it come up to temp along with the other ceramics.  You can use parchment paper under the pizza.  That helps keep it a bit cleaner as well.  Ultimately I don’t think the burned bits will effect anything aside from how pretty your stone is.  A dirty Egg is a used Egg.
    XL  Central Ohio
  • 1voyager1voyager Posts: 300
    edited April 27
    I let the fire continue to rock and roll @ 500-600 degrees for about 30 minutes after the pizza is removed. Then I scrape the bits off of the stone with my metal pizza peel.
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,044
    Please describe your set up. Are you just using your stone directly on the grill? Or are you using your PS with spacers and then your stone?
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • timgaunttimgaunt Posts: 4
    I wonder if I didn't let it warm up enough last time. That or over did the topping. The dirtiness was only an issue in that it meant stuff stuck more...

    I generally popped the stone onto the plate setter with its legs down. Nothing else unusual.

    Is there a recommended temperature to cook it at? 
  • NCSmokyNCSmoky Posts: 236
    timgaunt said:
    I wonder if I didn't let it warm up enough last time. That or over did the topping. The dirtiness was only an issue in that it meant stuff stuck more...

    I generally popped the stone onto the plate setter with its legs down. Nothing else unusual.

    Is there a recommended temperature to cook it at? 
    Put the grate on the PS then the stone on the grate.
    Asheville NC - XL Med Mini MM 
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,103
    timgaunt said:
    ...

    Is there a recommended temperature to cook it at? 
    Different styles of pizza are best cooked at differing temps.  Dough recipes should be matched to the style and cooked within the designed temp range.  Good thing about an egg is it can handle the full temp range for any style of pizza you may want. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • You need an air gap between the stone and the platesetter, especially if you have them in direct contact.  Balled up foil will work or any 1/2" thick, heat-resistant material.  Be sire to preheat the stone as others have noted.
    Morro Bay, CA
  • timgaunttimgaunt Posts: 4
    Thanks all. Had some fun making these and they turned out better than expected. Good shout on putting the air gap between the stone and PS. I didn't do that last time. I guess it makes the stone hotter 

     
  • Looks like you are on your way.
    Morro Bay, CA
  • alaskanassasinalaskanassasin Posts: 293
    edited May 1
    You need an air gap between the stone and the platesetter, especially if you have them in direct contact.  Balled up foil will work or any 1/2" thick, heat-resistant material.  Be sire to preheat the stone as others have noted.
      This.  I use two stacks of three fire bricks on legs down PS to get the grate up and put your stone on that, stone temp around 500
      That pizza looks awesome BTW
  • timgaunttimgaunt Posts: 4
    Thanks alaskanassasin, will try that as well next time. I definitely thing the missing trick was getting the air gap in there, the pizzas turned out really well and the base was super light as we left it to proof longer than we perhaps should have. I've still got the oil burns on the roof of my mouth haha
  • GoooDawgsGoooDawgs Posts: 652
    Get an infrared thermometer so you know the temp ot the stone.   The stone can be +/- 200 degrees from the dome thermometer, so the infrared helps give you consistency in your cooks.
    Milton, GA 
    XL BGE & FB300
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,103
    Air gap is important but you also need to get the pizza up into the sweet spot.  Varies depending on style of pizza, temp, etc but normally 2-3 inches above the felt line is a good starting place.  I might go higher, but the size of the pizza stones limits how high it can be placed before reducing air flow around it.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
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