Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Knife sharpeners/sharpening systems

CtTOPGUNCtTOPGUN Posts: 482
 I have decided I need to be able to properly sharpen my knives. I have been looking into options lately and think I want some sort of system to control angles as I don't trust my own skills at this time. I wish I trusted myself to freehand with a large stone, but not for now. A friend has suggested the Lansky controlled angle system. I actually have borrowed his to see what I think. I will tackle a couple cheaper knives tomorrow. Does anyone have any experience with this system? Any suggestions for any other "reasonably" priced systems? How about an electric like the Chef's Choice 15*/20*? Any help is appreciated.
LBGE/Weber Kettle/Blackstone 36" Griddle/Turkey Fryer/Induction Burner/Gasser/28" Blackstone Griddle

 BBQ from the State of Connecticut!

   Jim
«1

Comments

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,940
    Likewise, I can't/couldn't keep my hand steady enough.

    I looked at the Lansky some years ago. Didn't seem to have enough angle control for the edge bevel. Some of my better blades have bevels down to 8 degrees. Otherwise seemed fine.

    Some electric sharpeners have been decent for some years. A couple of decades ago, they were not good. If you have knives that should be sharpened within that range, should be OK, but do consider getting a good strop and honing abrasive.

    I ended up w. an Apex EdgePro. Kinda pricey, and took practice to use it. But I can get a mirror finish on anything if I want to be obsessive-compulsive.


  • MN-EggerMN-Egger Posts: 93
    After going through a couple cheapies I got the Chef's Choice and with the three stages of sharpening it has, you can quickly get any knife scary sharp.
    --
    Jeff
    Near Twin Cities, MN
    Large BGE
  • SoCalTimSoCalTim Posts: 2,155
    I've recently been taking a knife or two to my local Farmers market, I found an 'old timer' who does magic on my knives. Only three bucks ea .. fyi.
    I've slow smoked and eaten so much pork, I'm legally recognized as being part swine - Chatsworth Ca.
  • I have the Work Sharp Ken Onion and really like it. Not for everyone but I have had very good results with it. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 13,004
    Bob Kramer has a kit for $300. Wooden base, 3 sharpening stones and a nagura stone. Completely freehand though. He makes it look easy.


    I bought a King 1000/6000 grit combo stone with stand plus a nagura a while back, but haven't mastered it yet. Essentially what he's pushing, but for $32. =)

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • CashfanCashfan Posts: 353
    I've been down the sharpening rabbit hole for couple years. I've tried numerous sharpening systems, including the Lansky (used it for years), Spyderco Sharpmaker, Ken Onion Work Sharp, an electric one with set angles, Apex Edge Pro and stones.

    I'm still a novice sharpener, but the more I get into it the more freehand stones are the way to go for me, and everyone is different. The problem with electrics like the Chefs choice is that if the knife isn't ground to those specific angles, they are useless and could damage a nice blade.

    The Lansky isn't very accurate for the angle and I had a hard time getting it to hold my knife and keep it from moving. Consistency is the key to sharpening, and if the blade is moving theres no consistency. I had cheap knives and didn't care, just wanted them sharp and it worked for that.

    The Ken Onion is great if you want a convex edge on everything. 

    The Edge Pro is excellent but a bit expensive. And theres cleaning curve, but I have re-profiled knives to a mirror polish and hair whittling sharp.

    I would recommend someone starting to get a Spyderco Sharpmaker and/or a fine or extra fine stone. Mark the edge of the blade with a sharpie, take a couple strokes with either setup, and figure out where to hold to bring the existing edge back. A few strokes and it should be sharp, if the edge isn't rolled and chipped too bad.

    Also, the best way to sharpen a knife is to not let get dull. I strop my folder every few days, and run my kitchen knives on the steel frequently. If a knife isn't sharp its useless. 
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 10,538
    Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
  • Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
    Had one for a few years. It does everything it says it does. The Ken onion version allows you to change the angle and has a few other upgrades. Worth the extra $. I’ve reworked a pitted blade with it and reshaped the end of a shun that we broke the tip off of. I really like it but it’s does not put a conventional chisel edge like a stone will. I have not noticed any detriment to having a convex edge over chisel but I’m sure there are arguments for either. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 10,538
    Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
    Had one for a few years. It does everything it says it does. The Ken onion version allows you to change the angle and has a few other upgrades. Worth the extra $. I’ve reworked a pitted blade with it and reshaped the end of a shun that we broke the tip off of. I really like it but it’s does not put a conventional chisel edge like a stone will. I have not noticed any detriment to having a convex edge over chisel but I’m sure there are arguments for either. 
    They have a couple kitchen models out now. I say now because I think they are new and simplified for that market. Less versatile and more specific. Thanks for the input. Seems like a worthwhile product for most people. Not for everyone of course. 
  • CashfanCashfan Posts: 353
    Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
    Had one for a few years. It does everything it says it does. The Ken onion version allows you to change the angle and has a few other upgrades. Worth the extra $. I’ve reworked a pitted blade with it and reshaped the end of a shun that we broke the tip off of. I really like it but it’s does not put a conventional chisel edge like a stone will. I have not noticed any detriment to having a convex edge over chisel but I’m sure there are arguments for either. 
    The Ken Onion is definitely the way to go if your thinking Worksharp. It will    re-profile well and get blades very sharp, and is easy to use. Bought mine on sale, and sharpened a few knives with it, but none that I use regularly. 

    I haven't used it on my kitchen knives because of the convex edge. I haven't messed with convex edges very much. Are you able to still use a honing rod to touch it up? Or do you have to run it through the WS with a fine grit? I did use it in a cheaper kitchen knife I have, but always reach for the Shun.
  • Cashfan said:
    Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
    Had one for a few years. It does everything it says it does. The Ken onion version allows you to change the angle and has a few other upgrades. Worth the extra $. I’ve reworked a pitted blade with it and reshaped the end of a shun that we broke the tip off of. I really like it but it’s does not put a conventional chisel edge like a stone will. I have not noticed any detriment to having a convex edge over chisel but I’m sure there are arguments for either. 
    The Ken Onion is definitely the way to go if your thinking Worksharp. It will    re-profile well and get blades very sharp, and is easy to use. Bought mine on sale, and sharpened a few knives with it, but none that I use regularly. 

    I haven't used it on my kitchen knives because of the convex edge. I haven't messed with convex edges very much. Are you able to still use a honing rod to touch it up? Or do you have to run it through the WS with a fine grit? I did use it in a cheaper kitchen knife I have, but always reach for the Shun.
    All my chef knives are shun and I use WSKO on them exclusively. Some would probably think that is heresy putting a convex edge on Japanese steel but I really like it. They stay sharp for weeks then I run them through 3-4 times a side on fine grit to hone them up. I don’t see why you couldn’t use a rod but they stay sharp so long i haven’t needed to. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 2,987
    SoCalTim said:
    I've recently been taking a knife or two to my local Farmers market, I found an 'old timer' who does magic on my knives. Only three bucks ea .. fyi.
    This is what we have, hrs there every Saturday and only a couple blocks from home 
    Visalia, Ca
  • Thanks for the inspiration. Time to get some practice in with some funky blades before going after my Shuns and DogHouse Forge blade. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN

  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 10,538
    Thanks for the inspiration. Time to get some practice in with some funky blades before going after my Shuns and DogHouse Forge blade. 
    Knives and copious amounts of whiskey! What possibly could go wrong???? LoL!!!!
  • WardsterWardster Posts: 1,006
    Thanks for the inspiration. Time to get some practice in with some funky blades before going after my Shuns and DogHouse Forge blade. 
    Let me know if you can figure out how to get the tips sharp on those hunting knives.  I can keep my skinning knife razor sharp except the tip, the most important part!!!  If I remember correctly, it seems to lose contact with the guide when I get to the tip and then it's free hand.
    Apollo Beach, FL
  • CtTOPGUNCtTOPGUN Posts: 482
     Well, I had some time to play with my buddy's Lansky set. I sharpened 4 different knives. None of them too expensive so I did not worry about making mistakes. One Sabatier chef knife. One 10" carbon steel Old Hickory butcher knife. One Calphalon Katana and one 4.5" pocket knife. As a newb, I had no trouble putting sharp edges on all 4 of them. 30* on the pocket knife to last a while cutting mostly cardboard and plastic ties on packaging. 25* for the butcher and Katana for kitchen grunt work. 20* for the chef.  For the price I think I will start with a set of Lansky stones and a few extras. Under $100 and I think I will be pretty happy for a while. Maybe in time I will graduate to freehand on large good quality stones. 
    LBGE/Weber Kettle/Blackstone 36" Griddle/Turkey Fryer/Induction Burner/Gasser/28" Blackstone Griddle

     BBQ from the State of Connecticut!

       Jim
  • GrillSgtGrillSgt Posts: 1,731
    Avoid electrics like the plague. 
    Woodford & Barren Co. KY

    LBGE, XLBGE, 2 Weber Genesis, Weber 22" kettle

    I’d kill for a Nobel Peace Prize

  • Build one of these and you can sharpen all your knives and all your friends knives!  My knives are scalpel sharp, as are my scissors, chisels, mower blades, etc.  Got the parts on eBay for it.   

    Land of OZ-Central Kansas

    BGE XL with Flameboss 300 WiFi++Blackstone 36"+++Weber Smoky Joe++

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,281
    If you want true angle control, buy an Edge Pro Apex and be done with it.  True mirror edges rule all.  I took it a step further with Chosera stones from chefsknivestogo.com.  Worth every single penny.  
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,281
    Cashfan said:
    I've been down the sharpening rabbit hole for couple years. I've tried numerous sharpening systems, including the Lansky (used it for years), Spyderco Sharpmaker, Ken Onion Work Sharp, an electric one with set angles, Apex Edge Pro and stones.

    I'm still a novice sharpener, but the more I get into it the more freehand stones are the way to go for me, and everyone is different. The problem with electrics like the Chefs choice is that if the knife isn't ground to those specific angles, they are useless and could damage a nice blade.

    The Lansky isn't very accurate for the angle and I had a hard time getting it to hold my knife and keep it from moving. Consistency is the key to sharpening, and if the blade is moving theres no consistency. I had cheap knives and didn't care, just wanted them sharp and it worked for that.

    The Ken Onion is great if you want a convex edge on everything. 

    The Edge Pro is excellent but a bit expensive. And theres cleaning curve, but I have re-profiled knives to a mirror polish and hair whittling sharp.

    I would recommend someone starting to get a Spyderco Sharpmaker and/or a fine or extra fine stone. Mark the edge of the blade with a sharpie, take a couple strokes with either setup, and figure out where to hold to bring the existing edge back. A few strokes and it should be sharp, if the edge isn't rolled and chipped too bad.

    Also, the best way to sharpen a knife is to not let get dull. I strop my folder every few days, and run my kitchen knives on the steel frequently. If a knife isn't sharp its useless. 
    I concur cash, on everything.
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,281
    edited March 12
    Cashfan said:
    Just looked at Worksharp system for kitchen knives. Seems pretty cool. 
    Had one for a few years. It does everything it says it does. The Ken onion version allows you to change the angle and has a few other upgrades. Worth the extra $. I’ve reworked a pitted blade with it and reshaped the end of a shun that we broke the tip off of. I really like it but it’s does not put a conventional chisel edge like a stone will. I have not noticed any detriment to having a convex edge over chisel but I’m sure there are arguments for either. 
    The Ken Onion is definitely the way to go if your thinking Worksharp. It will    re-profile well and get blades very sharp, and is easy to use. Bought mine on sale, and sharpened a few knives with it, but none that I use regularly. 

    I haven't used it on my kitchen knives because of the convex edge. I haven't messed with convex edges very much. Are you able to still use a honing rod to touch it up? Or do you have to run it through the WS with a fine grit? I did use it in a cheaper kitchen knife I have, but always reach for the Shun.
    All my chef knives are shun and I use WSKO on them exclusively. Some would probably think that is heresy putting a convex edge on Japanese steel but I really like it. They stay sharp for weeks then I run them through 3-4 times a side on fine grit to hone them up. I don’t see why you couldn’t use a rod but they stay sharp so long i haven’t needed to. 
    I sharpen the Shuns well over once a year, honing religiously at the altar before each use.  Some food for thought bud.  Definition of sharp is subjective, and open for debate.
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • If you do build a knife grinder, you can buy the various 2” x 72” belts for $2 each and actually make good money sharpening equipment for others!  See belt rack on wall.

    Land of OZ-Central Kansas

    BGE XL with Flameboss 300 WiFi++Blackstone 36"+++Weber Smoky Joe++

  • 20stone20stone Posts: 1,481
    If you do build a knife grinder, you can buy the various 2” x 72” belts for $2 each and actually make good money sharpening equipment for others!  See belt rack on wall.

    That's a helluva garage.  Mine is too jammed with refrigeration for that many work surfaces. 
    LBGE since 2008 and a MM from 2016
    Karubeque C-60 Dishwasher (when time is no object)
    Owner of multiple large scale refrigeration devices (sometimes too many)
    Vertically integrated BBQ and charcuterie operator, for recreational use only
    Elicitor of secrets from goats through unconventional methods
    Sourdough bread enthusiast

    Houston, TX

  • Fred19FlintstoneFred19Flintstone Posts: 7,462
    I have a Tormek I bought for woodworking chisels and other tools with an edge.  Works well on knives.  I wish I had some really good ones in my kitchen to sharpen.
    Flint, Michigan
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,692
    I have a Tormek, Apex, Ken Onion Work Sharp.  Tormek is the best for setting an angle.  Apex for precision polishing, Work Sharp for convenience.  All need some modicum of skill to work right.  What do we use the most?  This silly thing I bought for SWMBO that's conveniently located in our kitchen and any idiot can use.  That and a steel.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • CashfanCashfan Posts: 353
    Focker said:
    If you want true angle control, buy an Edge Pro Apex and be done with it.  True mirror edges rule all.  I took it a step further with Chosera stones from chefsknivestogo.com.  Worth every single penny.  
    Chosera stones are the bomb!! They work much better than the edge pro stones, definitely worth every penny. The Edge Pro is an excellent sharpening system.

    I've been sharpening my pocket knives to a mirror finish with a 20* micro bevel, and have issues with chipping. Seems like every other week the blade is chipped. The edge also seems to need a lot of maintaining. A few weeks ago I picked up a Mini Crooked River, and didn't have time right away to put a new edge on it, and it seems to be a little more durable than the polished edges. Doesn't look as nice, but seems to need a little less maintenance. I noticed I chipped the blade a little bit and took it to a x-fine stone and cleaned it up freehand yesterday. Going to let it ride a while longer and see how it holds up. All my recent blades have been S30V. I open boxes, cut a lot of plastic, cardboard, and occasionally drywall. Drywall is really hard on the edge, pretty sure thats what chipped it. I dont recommend doing that, but I'm not going out to the van to get a utility knife for couple of cuts when I have knife in my pocket.....
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,014
    i learned how to use a stone when i was 5 and havent looked back =) it works on my kitchen knives, fillet knives, hunting knives, ax, straight razor etc
  • @pgprescott that’s pretty much what my sister said. Spoils of war from a whiskey tasting event. Fortunately yesterday was a “purge” after Saturday. 

    @Wardster I can’t help ya. I tried free handing them and finally took all my hunting tips back to a stone. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,281
    edited March 12
    Cashfan said:
    Focker said:
    If you want true angle control, buy an Edge Pro Apex and be done with it.  True mirror edges rule all.  I took it a step further with Chosera stones from chefsknivestogo.com.  Worth every single penny.  
    Chosera stones are the bomb!! They work much better than the edge pro stones, definitely worth every penny. The Edge Pro is an excellent sharpening system.

    I've been sharpening my pocket knives to a mirror finish with a 20* micro bevel, and have issues with chipping. Seems like every other week the blade is chipped. The edge also seems to need a lot of maintaining. A few weeks ago I picked up a Mini Crooked River, and didn't have time right away to put a new edge on it, and it seems to be a little more durable than the polished edges. Doesn't look as nice, but seems to need a little less maintenance. I noticed I chipped the blade a little bit and took it to a x-fine stone and cleaned it up freehand yesterday. Going to let it ride a while longer and see how it holds up. All my recent blades have been S30V. I open boxes, cut a lot of plastic, cardboard, and occasionally drywall. Drywall is really hard on the edge, pretty sure thats what chipped it. I dont recommend doing that, but I'm not going out to the van to get a utility knife for couple of cuts when I have knife in my pocket.....
    Thanks for the tip.
    Drywall is brutal on blades.  Cut a lot if it in my lumberyard days.

    How do you like the mini CR?
    I am about to pull the trigger on the original CR, the mini looks great too.  I may just buy both. Lol
    My problem is, I want to buy it in a store where I can look it all over.  Centering, grind, fit and finish.  Whichever I see first, it's coming home.

    Peeps with both are really fond of the mini, that isn't really a mini.  One of the best blends of new school old school.  BM nailed it with both CRs.  
    Watched this video the other day. 
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.