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Tri Tip Roast

I received in email yesterday promoting Tri Tip Roasts. I never see this cut in the Publix that I usually shop at. Does anyone have experience with this cut of beef and cooking suggestions whether grilling or smoking? Thanks for reading.

Comments

  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 3,529
    edited July 9
    Yes, they are awesome.  Reverse sear is a great way to cook them - that way you can get a little smoke on them and then a nice sear. MR - Med works best, IMO.

    Make sure you look up how the grain runs on a trip tip so you can slice it properly (against the grain).

    Or here you go:


    NOLA
  • TigerDunesTigerDunes Posts: 42
    Thank you for your reply...what exactly is reverse sear?...one side is smoked, one side is seared?...you prefer this method over smoking on BGE?...thx
  • GamecockeggmanGamecockeggman Posts: 1,225
    The reverse sear is basically a low and slow until the meat get just below your desired temperature.  At that point you remove the roast from the egg and wrap it in foil while you allow your egg to go nuclear.  Once your temp is up to 500 or so throw it back on to sear the outside.  Let it rest a few and slice into the deliciousness you have created.  Enjoy
    Go Gamecocks!!!
    1 XL, 1 MM
    Smoking in Aiken South Carolina
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 24,211
    Give the search function here a go as there are a multitude of threads regarding tri-tips, a forum favorite cut to Q.  Or run it thru google and egghead forum.  FWIW-
    Louisville; "indeterminate Jim" here.  Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!
  • Tspud1Tspud1 Posts: 1,346
    buzd504 said:
    Yes, they are awesome.  Reverse sear is a great way to cook them - that way you can get a little smoke on them and then a nice sear. MR - Med works best, IMO.

    Make sure you look up how the grain runs on a trip tip so you can slice it properly (against the grain).

    Or here you go:


    Is this the actual slicing that is pictured or do the slices go perpendicular to these lines
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 8,138
    Tspud1 said:
    buzd504 said:
    Yes, they are awesome.  Reverse sear is a great way to cook them - that way you can get a little smoke on them and then a nice sear. MR - Med works best, IMO.

    Make sure you look up how the grain runs on a trip tip so you can slice it properly (against the grain).

    Or here you go:


    Is this the actual slicing that is pictured or do the slices go perpendicular to these lines
    With the lines which is against the grain 
    Visalia, Ca

    LGBE- Pit's by Klose Trailer -Stumps XL Stretch - Custom Santa Maria-Modified HD Offset Smoker Reverse Flow- FatStack Smoker FS120 coming soon Fat Stacks 500- Blackstone 36 Blackstone 22 - Custom Cold Smoke House and a lonely Brinkman Vertical Smoker
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 16,545
    I use a Mediterranean marinade, then grill low and slow, with a reverse seer.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • danhoodanhoo Posts: 151
    I've been slow smoking at 180 to 200F until internal temp reaches 120F. 

    Then reverse sear until it feels done or internal temp is at 130 to 135.

    Rest, carve, eat.
    2011 large BGE | 2000 Genesis Silver B | 2019 PitBoss pro 820 | 2016 Genesis E330 (bought used in 2021)
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 24,211
    @TigerDunes - just make sure you give any tri-tip a good look before seasoning as the grain pattern can have wide variance from the above, although that is a good representation.  Generally the seam is where the direction will change but I've had 'em with no real direction change across the cut. 
    Always remember the 5th Law of Thermodynamics- "The friggin cow drives the cook!"
    Louisville; "indeterminate Jim" here.  Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!
  • TechsasJimTechsasJim Posts: 171
    lousubcap said:
    @TigerDunes - just make sure you give any tri-tip a good look before seasoning as the grain pattern can have wide variance from the above, although that is a good representation.  Generally the seam is where the direction will change but I've had 'em with no real direction change across the cut. 
    Always remember the 5th Law of Thermodynamics- "The friggin cow drives the cook!"
    Agree with this.   I cook these often and the grain varies quite a bit.   I usually put a couple scores in mine before seasoning so I know exactly where the grains are and change so after the cook I can easily identify where to slice.  
    LBGE, HCI 9.4, SE Texas
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