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Turkey confit from Cook’s Illustrated recipe

RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
The Nov-Dec issue just arrived and it has a mouthwatering confit recipe using turkey thighs. It highly recommends using duck fat but swmbo doesn’t like duck meat so I’m not sure where to buy duck fat. Can it be bought somewhere?
Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
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Comments

  • GregWGregW Posts: 2,315
    Amazon carries duck fat. I bet some of the better grocery stores also stock it.
    I've never cooked with it, but I've heard it's good.
    Birmingham, AL
  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,800
    I’ve seen it at Walmart, but I can’t remember if it was chilled by butter, or shelf stored by like the olive oil. 
  • dbCooperdbCooper Posts: 605
    Likely unsuitable for confit but, should be in every pantry... https://duckfatspray.com/
    LBGE, LBGE-PTR, 22" Weber, Coleman 413G
    Great Plains, USA
  • tomtnctomtnc Posts: 6
    Kroger, Private Label $7.99. Can’t go wrong!!
  • BotchBotch Posts: 10,414
    edited October 11
    I've got a jar, er, half a jar, in the cupboard.  Can't remember from where.
     
    Gotta say, though, I've not had a confit that I liked....  :|
    ____________________________________________
    Introvert Engineers - Social Distancing before it was cool.  
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    Thanks for all the ideas for sources! I honestly had no idea duck fat was that readily available!  With the reports of turkeys being smaller in size and in some locales even in short supply then this turkey thigh use makes even more sense! 
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    Botch said:
    I've got a jar, er, half a jar, in the cupboard.  Can't remember from where.
     
    Gotta say, though, I've not had a confit that I liked....  :|
    If you get a chance to read that issue or at least that recipe it just might change your mind.
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 10,414
    I'm a subscriber, my issue will probably arrive this next week.  We'll see.  
     
    There are a few things that are hugely popular, that just don't work for me; fruit on meat, confit, and even (please don't banninate me) pulled pork.  :i_dunno:  
    ____________________________________________
    Introvert Engineers - Social Distancing before it was cool.  
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 1,082
    edited October 11
    You can do a confit in the instant pot if you want to try it. Set the pot for slow cook on high setting. Apparently that’s about 210 degrees.  Put the meat in, I have done duck legs and chicken quarters this way.  Cover with duck fat ( save it in the fridge when done ). After 5 or 6 hours brown the skin under the broiler.  Damn, now I’m 😋 hungry 
    You can sub the duck fat with canola oil but I have never tried that.  Before doing the confit marinate the meat for overnight with a dry rub or paste in the fridge 

    You can use the duck fat to roast potato wedges as well, delicious!!


    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • johnmitchelljohnmitchell Posts: 5,530
    If you have a “Fresh Market” store where you live they carry it
    Greensboro North Carolina
    When in doubt Accelerate....
  • dannysdannys Posts: 105

    D'Artagnan sells it. It is in small, maybe 1 cup, tubs. You might try someplace that sells D'Artagnan products locally.

    WT CI Turkey article. First, they always seem to come up with a better "best XYZ recipe. Second, I was disappointed when I started reading the article. I couldn't find where they discussed the rest of the bird?!?!  I know too many people who think turkey begins and end with the breast meat. I went to a Thanksgiving at some relatives house where  they cooked 2 turkeys and three legs were thrown away. I cried.

    One more story... One our favorite restaurants was closing. We always shared the duck confit salad. I was discussing how much we were going to miss it with the chef and he said to just to the confit at home. He described the process then said "Wait a minute...". A couple of minutes later he showed up at our table with a 5# bucket of duck fat.  I used it a couple of tablespoons at a time but never made confit./ Finally threw it out during on of out moves.

  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    dannys said:



    WT CI Turkey article. First, they always seem to come up with a better "best XYZ recipe. Second, I was disappointed when I started reading the article. I couldn't find where they discussed the rest of the bird?!?!  I know too many people who think turkey begins and end with the breast meat. 


    I went to a Thanksgiving at some relatives house where  they cooked 2 turkeys and three legs were thrown away. I cried.



    I guess it all depends on where you live and shop - but here I have no problem buying just thighs or just drumsticks, even just wings. Much less just breasts.

    As for discards...my b-i-l finds glorious golden turkey skin revolting so he skins the birds before carving!
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 5,768
    I’m going to ask a dumb question. How important is the type of fat used in confit?
    Duck fat is a bit expensive for a once or twice per year cook. Could duck fat be mixed with canola? Or duck/Crisco? Maybe just lard?

    I could find out by cooking myself, but someone hear might have an answer. 

    Is suppose a small amount of duck fat with legs in a vacuum bag, then sous vide is effectively cooking confit - it’s all about the lower temps...

    not trying to be a heretic, just trying to learn. 
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven. LSG 24” cabinet offset smoker. There are a few paella pans and a Patagonia cross in the barn. 
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    edited October 11
    Well the article said duck fat was their favorite, but chicken fat was ok. BTW this recipe called for 6 cups of fat, so yes, it could be an expensive dish. 
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    RRP said:
    Well the article said duck fat was their favorite, but chicken fat was ok. BTW this recipe called for 6 cups of fat, so yes, it could be an expensive dish. 
    Furthermore - this recipe called for 4# of bone in thighs so at .5# per thigh (though they could weigh twice that or even a little more) then 8 thighs needing 6 cups of fat - well, you get the drift. When I get around to fixing this recipe I sure wouldn't be making a full recipe that's for sure!
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 14,517
    Could someone explain confit to me? I know the part about cooking meat in fat, at low temp, for a long time.

    What is the goal? Super tender meat? A difference in flavor that differs from SV? I don't recall having confit anything, but have often wondered about this cooking method.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 23,431
    edited October 11
    caliking said:
    Could someone explain confit to me? I know the part about cooking meat in fat, at low temp, for a long time.

    What is the goal? Super tender meat? A difference in flavor that differs from SV? I don't recall having confit anything, but have often wondered about this cooking method.
    Not going to be accused of plagiarism so here's excerpts from the article.

    "Confit" is derived from the French verb "confire" meaning to preserve.

    It produces a dense, silky meat with a concentrated deep, complex flavor with little effort. The melted fat heats the turkey meat gently, evenly and efficiently turning the meat very tender. The meat stays moist.
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 5,768
    @caliking This is my understanding. Confit in fat is to frying as low and slow bbq is to grilling. 

    As I understand it, the goal with confit is to keep the temp of the fat below the boiling point of water. 
    The result is to drive away less moisture and cook long enough to break down collagen and connective tissue. 
    When frying, all the vigorous bubbles when a product is first submerged is from water being driven away - that and high temps crisp the exterior of whatever is being fried. 

    I think of confit in the same way I think of my offset running at 225. Could it be fair to say confit is the old school sous vide? 
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven. LSG 24” cabinet offset smoker. There are a few paella pans and a Patagonia cross in the barn. 
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 5,768
    @caliking I’ll add that when I cook carnitas in my copper pot it is essentially confit. I cook at about 190 degrees until the pork is fall-apart tender. 
    It isn’t greasy because the fat is limited to the exterior of the meat. If water isn’t driven out-so there is no void to be filled with fat. (Or so I’ve read)
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven. LSG 24” cabinet offset smoker. There are a few paella pans and a Patagonia cross in the barn. 
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
  • Mattman3969Mattman3969 Posts: 10,049
    edited October 12
    @caliking - kinda sounds like “velveting” for stir fry except using fat instead of water. Low temp liquid as to not abuse the meat.  Am I understanding this correctly?

    -----------------------------------------


    2008 -Large BGE. 2013- Small BGE and 2015 - Mini. Henderson, Ky.
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 14,517
    @RRP @Mattman3969 @SciAggie Makes more sense now.  Thanks for breaking it down for me.

    HEB sells jars of duck fat, so it’s on next week's grocery list. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • AprèsSkiAprèsSki Posts: 59
    SciAggie said:

    I could find out by cooking myself, but someone hear might have an answer. 
      
    Is suppose a small amount of duck fat with legs in a vacuum bag, then sous vide is effectively cooking confit - it’s all about the lower temps...


    You are on the right track, Serious Eats took this on a while ago. https://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2017/12/sous-vide-duck-confit-recipe.html 

    As much as I love the process of making a pot of confit the bag it and hot tub it method is just easier. They freeze well too, just thaw and scrape all of the fat into a pan to crisp up your duck or turkey legs.  

    Don't fear the duck, our Costco sells them frozen. Once or twice a year, buy 4, thaw and butcher into breasts and legs, render the fat, confit the legs and freeze the breasts and then make stock with the rest. Your freezer will be very happy and you will eat well for a long time.

    Firing up the XL BGE in Salt Lake City
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 1,082
    The duck fat is a bit pricey but you reuse it for a long time so it’s really a long term investment. None gets lost in the process, as a matter of fact, more fat will be rendered in the confit process so you could even end up with more than you started with.

    I have wondered about putting the fat and thigh in a bag and then Sous Vide, not sure how well the bag would hold together at 200 degrees?
    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 2,404
    GlennM said:
    The duck fat is a bit pricey but you reuse it for a long time so it’s really a long term investment. None gets lost in the process, as a matter of fact, more fat will be rendered in the confit process so you could even end up with more than you started with.

    I have wondered about putting the fat and thigh in a bag and then Sous Vide, not sure how well the bag would hold together at 200 degrees?

    The article also gives instructions for Sous Vide and I believe it only calls for 1 cup of duck fat. 
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 8,154
    @20stone does his Thanksgiving Turkey this way.  

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • BotchBotch Posts: 10,414
    SonVolt said:

    I did make the Beef Wellington last night from the same issue. 


    Daammnnnn!!!   :o
    ____________________________________________
    Introvert Engineers - Social Distancing before it was cool.  
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • dannysdannys Posts: 105
    RRP said:
    I guess it all depends on where you live and shop - but here I have no problem buying just thighs or just drumsticks, even just wings. Much less just breasts.

    As for discards...my b-i-l finds glorious golden turkey skin revolting so he skins the birds before carving!

    There isn't any problem getting whole birds or parts here either. I was commenting that the article dealt with only the thighs and not the rest of the bird. To me, when some says "best turkey" I want the whole turkey not just the thighs. Don't get me wrong, I love the sound of confit turkey thighs and I have it on my list of things to try. But it would have to be for a select few of my family since most of them avoid the thigh and leg like the plague.

    Your BIL is committing a crime bordering on felonious.
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 10,439
    Is this the recipe? I can see the video but not the actual recipe. 
    https://www.cooksillustrated.com/videos/4479-turkey-thigh-confit-with-citrus-mustard-sauce



    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

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