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Lomé Star Grillz

i guess it’s one of those “the more I learn, the dumber I get kind of thing”. I just read The BBQ Manifesto by AyAyRon so I understand the creosote part of smoking with charcoal vs stick burners, etc. I was all over KarBQ and possibly still am. However, the Lone Star Grillz certainly have my attention now, as well. Looking at the vertical cabinets, it appears they use charcoal. So my question is, other than more cooking area, what possible advantage could that have over my BGEs? Maybe I’m missing something, so any help would be greatly appreciated.

Comments

  • SlippySlippy Posts: 212
    edited August 21
    The LSG vertical cabinets still use wood. I have a smoker similar to the LSG offset, and there really is no comparison to a BGE when it comes to smoked meat (IMO)... 100% wood is much better than charcoal for low and slow cooks. For some really long cooks, I will smoke in the offset for several hours, then move to the Egg to finish overnight... But I still prefer all wood when time permits... I really wanted a LSG but found another smoker, locally, that I liked almost as much, and no pricey shipping...

    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 212
    I see they now sell an insulated cabinet... That's probably what you are referring to. Not too keen those... But hey, I'm old skool.

    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Yes sir...I was referring to the insulated cabinet
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    I just looked at my title for this thread. How that happened, I’m not sure. Obviously should be Lone Star Grillz
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 5,396
    Like you say, more real estate. There is a bit more air flow ( not like a stick) so the smoke profile will be better than the egg on a vertical but not as good as a stick IMO. I just ordered Stumps XL Stretch and cant wait.I still have my stick burners 
    Visalia, Ca
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 6,420
    I was considering buying one of the Lone Star insulated vertical cabinets a couple years ago. They use charcoal not sticks.
    I don't have the direct experience with their insulated cabinet to say whether the finished results are significantly different from a kamado but since the LS insulated are using KBB or lump I don't believe there would be.
    Ultimately I decided that other than more capacity (which I  didn't really need) that they don't function much differently than my kamados (other than never cracking that is :) ).

    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 15,606
    Check out Deep South Smokers in Cumming. They make a really nice gravity feed and have gotten into some cabinet style offset hybrids as well. 
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Kind of what I was thinking, but wasn’t sure if I was missing something. 
  • Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • My gravity fed cooked great, and produced that nice light blue smoke.  It does impart a wonderful smoke profile in the food, as all that wood smoke has to pass thru that hot fire chamber before entering the cabinet!  It really cleans that smoke up!

    Land of OZ-Hays Kansas

    BGE XL++Flameboss 300 WiFi++Blackstone 36"++2 Weber Kettles

  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 212
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
    How about an offset vertical? https://lonestargrillz.com/collections/smokers/products/24-x-24-offset-vertical-smoker 

    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 19,492
    edited August 21
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 6,420
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
    What is your workflow when cooking a brisket/butt? Do you wrap either one at some point?
    If you do wrap then take it out of the KBQ and finish it in the kitchen oven. Once it is wrapped it is no longer going to be taking on more smoke so why keep burning wood? Putting it in the oven can save you a few hours of having to feed sticks every half hour or so.
    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • HeavyG said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
    What is your workflow when cooking a brisket/butt? Do you wrap either one at some point?
    If you do wrap then take it out of the KBQ and finish it in the kitchen oven. Once it is wrapped it is no longer going to be taking on more smoke so why keep burning wood? Putting it in the oven can save you a few hours of having to feed sticks every half hour or so.
    For sure. You can cook a little hotter and wrap at the stall and finish anywhere you want (egg, oven etc). My only thought in this is that I find my barkndoes not set up until later in the Cook on the kbq so I often don’t wrap at all when cooking onnit
     
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    So you pull them around 170 or so, then in the freezer?
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Slippy said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
    How about an offset vertical? https://lonestargrillz.com/collections/smokers/products/24-x-24-offset-vertical-That is definitely worth exploring. Anyone have one of these or thoughts about it?
  • Dawgtired said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    So you pull them around 170 or so, then in the freezer?
    Yep. They usually get there in 6-8 hours. Then freezer until the internal temp drops to under 100 then fridge until I’m ready  finish. Another 6-8 hours to get it finished. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 212
    Dawgtired said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    So you pull them around 170 or so, then in the freezer?
    Yep. They usually get there in 6-8 hours. Then freezer until the internal temp drops to under 100 then fridge until I’m ready  finish. Another 6-8 hours to get it finished. 
    It's interesting that you describe this technique now... Not an hour ago I was reading this on the TM BBQ finder app, and had not heard that prior... Intrigued... This is at Kirby's in Mexia. 
    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • Slippy said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    So you pull them around 170 or so, then in the freezer?
    Yep. They usually get there in 6-8 hours. Then freezer until the internal temp drops to under 100 then fridge until I’m ready  finish. Another 6-8 hours to get it finished. 
    It's interesting that you describe this technique now... Not an hour ago I was reading this on the TM BBQ finder app, and had not heard that prior... Intrigued... This is at Kirby's in Mexia. 
    My sister has a place 12 miles from Mexia. I’ll have to check it out when I visit in a few weeks. 
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 212
    Slippy said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Dawgtired said:
    Most insulated cabinets use a choked down charcoal fire just like a bge. More real estate, same dirty fire. 

    If you want a clean burning fire in a vertical cabinet you should look at the gravity Fed models. I came across these when doing my KBQ research and was very close to pulling the trigger before running into the kbq. 

    Gravity fed cookers still use charcoal and chips/chunks but they do run a very small fully ignited cleaner fire. It’s pretty ingenious but in the end, after all my research, I decided that if I was going to add another cooker I wanted it to burn a 100% wood. 
    I’m likely back on board the KBQ train. My only concern is refueling the fire every 30 mins or so. Chicken, etc, on shorter cooks, I could easily deal with with. Briskets and butts, are my concern. 
     brisket and butts are an ass-whip with all wood burning cookers. There is no way around it. I still do most on my bge for that reason. 

    I have done several “50/50” brisket cooks on my kbq. I cook until or through the stall, rapid cool in the freezer for an hour, then refrigerate and finish the next day. They have all turned out great with no discernable difference in quality. It’s more of a PITA than a bge cook but it is a very workable alternative when you don’t want to stay up all night but still want to cook over a wood fire.

    FWIW, some of the more legendary joints down here (notably Salt Lick In Driftwood and Blacks in Lockhart) Cook all their briskets this way. Often refrigerating for several days before finishing them off for service. 

    It’s still a far cry from the “set and forget” nature of a bge or cabinet smoker but that’s part of the fun and the results speak for themselves. 
    So you pull them around 170 or so, then in the freezer?
    Yep. They usually get there in 6-8 hours. Then freezer until the internal temp drops to under 100 then fridge until I’m ready  finish. Another 6-8 hours to get it finished. 
    It's interesting that you describe this technique now... Not an hour ago I was reading this on the TM BBQ finder app, and had not heard that prior... Intrigued... This is at Kirby's in Mexia. 
    My sister has a place 12 miles from Mexia. I’ll have to check it out when I visit in a few weeks. 
    Got a 4.5 rating in TM... Must be pretty good. 

    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • SGHSGH Posts: 26,445
    edited August 22
    For the record Lonestar has some vertical offsets as well. They are not insulated cabinet smokers and they run just like a traditional horizontal offset. 
    With that said, and this almost goes without saying, they draft slightly different than a horizontal. Nonetheless they are outstanding offsets in their own right. 
    Here is one of their vertical offsets. 

    The above is not an insulated cabinet. It is a true stick burner in every sense of the word.  

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.

    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit

    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought, in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 

    Just a man with a Muhle. 
  • DawgtiredDawgtired Posts: 359
    Thanks everyone for the responses. 
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