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Cured Turkey?

I know plenty of people that brine their turkey. But does anybody ever cure it? People around here go crazy for the turkey at the local butcher shops this time of year. They are smoked but I notice that they are always cured. I am in charge of the Thanksgiving turkey this year and I know I will brine it. But I can’t seem to find much info on whole “cured” turkey. Does anybody on here cure there turkey?
NW IOWA

Comments

  • Philly35Philly35 Posts: 772
    edited November 9
    Nobody?? Apparently I should of named the post OT cured turkey peace out OT
    NW IOWA
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,672
    I have no idea, but I'm interested in the answer.
    NOLA
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,790
    Philly35 said:
    Nobody?? Apparently I should of named the post OT cured turkey peace out OT
    i have never seen one, it must be a local type item. closest ive seen would be a kosher dry salted fresh bird
  • SGHSGH Posts: 25,227
    Philly35 said:
    Does anybody on here cure there turkey?
    Absolutely. Been doing it for years. A couple of times a year I will cure turkey legs to make our version of Disney World smoked turkey legs. 
    I use Processors Choice Brown Sugar Cure A478 0050. Simply mix the cure per the directions that come with it, inject the turkey heavily with the cure, and then soak (submerge) the turkey in the liquid cure for 48 hours. It’s just that simple my friend. I use that same cure for making our version of homemade Honey Baked Hams as well. 
    If you need farther guidance or have questions, shoot me a text or call later this afternoon. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • Philly35Philly35 Posts: 772
    I’ve cured my fair share of turkey legs. I was just curious if anyone cures the whole bird?
    NW IOWA
  • SGHSGH Posts: 25,227
    Philly35 said:
    I’ve cured my fair share of turkey legs. I was just curious if anyone cures the whole bird?
    Yes sir. It works on the whole bird or a whole breast just as well. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • GregWGregW Posts: 1,795
    I'm not familiar with the cured turkey legs. Are they a lot better than simply smoking the legs in a smoker?
    I'm definitely interested in curing a whole turkey, if they turn out better than a traditionally smoked one. Curing a ham sounds good also.
     My test brined Turkey from a few weeks ago was a failure.
    The specter of a Thanksgiving Turkey ruined is already causing me to lose sleep.

    Birmingham, AL
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,227
    Better?  Definitely different. Many would say better.  Serving a cured turkey at Thanksgiving would sure surprise your guests.  Not the flavor profile they would expect.  For a more traditional approach for turkey day, I would go with normal cooked turkey and maybe cook some additional cured thigh or legs for people to try. 

    Not sure what a second cure on a ham would do. Definitely wouldn't try it for the first time for Thanksgiving.  
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • Philly35Philly35 Posts: 772
    GregW said:
    I'm not familiar with the cured turkey legs. Are they a lot better than simply smoking the legs in a smoker?
    I'm definitely interested in curing a whole turkey, if they turn out better than a traditionally smoked one. Curing a ham sounds good also.
     My test brined Turkey from a few weeks ago was a failure.
    The specter of a Thanksgiving Turkey ruined is already causing me to lose sleep.

    Care to elaborate on your failed turkey? What happened?
    NW IOWA
  • GregWGregW Posts: 1,795
    Philly35 said:
    GregW said:
    I'm not familiar with the cured turkey legs. Are they a lot better than simply smoking the legs in a smoker?
    I'm definitely interested in curing a whole turkey, if they turn out better than a traditionally smoked one. Curing a ham sounds good also.
     My test brined Turkey from a few weeks ago was a failure.
    The specter of a Thanksgiving Turkey ruined is already causing me to lose sleep.

    Care to elaborate on your failed turkey? What happened?
    The 24 hr brine left the turkey excessively moist. The excess moisture also diluted the traditional flavor of the meat.
    A 12 hr brine would probably help.
    Birmingham, AL
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