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OT: Tikka Masala Pizza Sauce

JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 12,440
edited May 11 in Off Topic
Couple folks asked for this one after I made some of the pizzas at Butt Blast with it.  It's a riff off of the recipe in Fetterman's Sous Vide at Home book.  As @caliking says, I have gringo-fied it.  

Ingredients:

1 TBS canola oil

3TBS butter
1 shallot, minced
3 cloves garlic, minced
1/4 TSP ground ginger

1.5 cups tomato-puree 
1 TB sugar
2 TB curry powder
1 TSP kosher salt
1 TSP paprika
1 TSP honey
1 TBS ground tumeric
1/2 TSP ground cumin
1/2 TSP ground coriander
1/2 TSP cayenne pepper

1/2 cup plain Greek yogurt
1 pint heavy cream

S&P to taste


Process:

Over medium heat in a large skillet, heat up 1 TBS of canola oil until it shimmers.  Add in the butter, shallot, garlic, and ginger.  Cook 3-5 minutes until softened, stirring frequently.  Add in sugar, curry powder, salt, and paprika.  Stir to combine.

Add the tomato puree, sugar, curry powder, salt, paprika, honey, tumeric, cumin, coriander, and cayenne pepper.  Stir to combine.  Bring the mixture to a simmer and remove from the heat.  

Add in the yogurt and stir.  The mixture should change color from a deep red to a deep orange with the yogurt.

At this point you'll have a fairly thick paste in front of you.   This is where things get Americanized, mofos.   At this point  add as much or as little of the heavy cream as you want to thin it out and get to the consistency you want.  It will still be fairly thick compared to most pizza sauces, but that's ok.  



Season with salt and pepper to taste.  I just use a pinch of each.  

I use this as a base on pizza.  I top with red onions, grilled chicken, and fresh mozz.  The end result is a fusion of chicken tikka masala, something close to naan bread (with the pizza dough), and goodness.  


"If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

"The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand." - DT


«1

Comments

  • JethroVAJethroVA Posts: 1,065
    beautiful 
    Richmond, VA. Large BGE, Weber gas, little Weber charcoal. Vintage ManGrates.
  • MnMmasterMnMmaster Posts: 16
    I wish I was eating that pizza right now it looks beautiful. A great fusion ish type dish. I just might have to try this one of these days
  • Killit_and_GrillitKillit_and_Grillit Posts: 3,897
    Thanks John!  I’ll make this happen Sunday. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN

  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 12,440
    MnMmaster said:
    I wish I was eating that pizza right now it looks beautiful. A great fusion ish type dish. I just might have to try this one of these days
    If you like Indian food at all, it’s definitely worth a shot. 
    "If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

    "The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand." - DT


  • cookingdude555cookingdude555 Posts: 1,705
    looks incredible, thanks for posting the recipe with it

    John - SLC, UT

    2 XLs, Large, Medium, MM, and Mini

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,608
    It may be gringo-fied, but I definitely would have eaten more CTM pies if you had made them at BB. They were good. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    Yep.  Thanks for sharing dookie.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 5,359
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 12,440
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Ok.
    "If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

    "The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand." - DT


  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,608
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 13,010
    Are you freaking kidding me?????
    Awesome dude, will be trying that one...
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    YukonRon said:
    Are you freaking kidding me?????
    Awesome dude, will be trying that one...
    Ron, settle down my friend.  Will taste of Laetner.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • DMWDMW Posts: 13,261
    edited May 12
    Man that looks, sounds, (and if I remember correctly) tastes amazing.


    But...are you appropriating?
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - 18.5" WSM - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    DMW said:
    Man that looks, sounds, (and if I remember correctly) tastes amazing.


    But...are you appropriating?
    Clearly...
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • Hans61Hans61 Posts: 3,511

    “There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body.”
    Coach Finstock Teen Wolf
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 5,359
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Ok.
    Paprika, cayenne, and tomatoes are native to the Americas, thus "Americanized".

    It was funnier in my head. :)
    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,827
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Dammit!  I thought I was cooking some Indian shît!  We love CTM. 
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 6,296
    Sounds and looks incredible, cooked in RB?
    canuckland
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Dammit!  I thought I was cooking some Indian shît!  We love CTM. 
    You couldn’t float CTM on a good day.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • DMWDMW Posts: 13,261
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Dammit!  I thought I was cooking some Indian shît!  We love CTM. 
    You can read all about it:
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chicken_tikka_masala

    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - 18.5" WSM - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,827
    I was making CTM pizza when CTM pizza wasn’t cool, bîtch!
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    bgebrent said:
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Dammit!  I thought I was cooking some Indian shît!  We love CTM. 
    You couldn’t float CTM on a good day.
    Click Agree
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 6,585
    I had a pizza with this exact same sauce the last time i connected thru the Atlanta airport.  It was amazing.  Thanks for the thread.  
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • BiggreenpharmacistBiggreenpharmacist Posts: 4,218
    I was making CTM pizza when CTM pizza wasn’t cool, bîtch!

    Little Rock, AR

  • theyolksonyoutheyolksonyou Posts: 16,827
    I was making CTM pizza when CTM pizza wasn’t cool, bîtch!

    Someone ALWAYS gets it on this forum. 
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. My wings either. 
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 5,359
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Most folks seem to credit CTM to a chef from Bangladesh working in a restaurant in Glasgow and my Scottish ancestors wouldn't take too kindly to being considered "British". :)

    I only commented on the three "American" ingredients as I recently finished an interesting book titled "The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats" and it's had me thinking about where various items originated and how they have spread around the world.

    I should have provided some context with my original post.
    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • BiggreenpharmacistBiggreenpharmacist Posts: 4,218
    I was making CTM pizza when CTM pizza wasn’t cool, bîtch!

    Someone ALWAYS gets it on this forum. 
    From my hat down to my boots.............

    Little Rock, AR

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,179
    bgebrent said:
    bgebrent said:
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Dammit!  I thought I was cooking some Indian shît!  We love CTM. 
    You couldn’t float CTM on a good day.
    Click Agree
    Finally getting my troll count up!
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • Killit_and_GrillitKillit_and_Grillit Posts: 3,897
    John I’m so glad I pm’d you for this today. 

    I learned....so many interesting things from this thread. 

    "Brought to you by bourbon, bacon, and a series of questionable life decisions."

    South of Nashville, TN

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,608
    HeavyG said:
    caliking said:
    HeavyG said:
    One could say that you Americanized it when you added the paprika, cayenne, and tomato sauce.


    Not quite. CTM is actually a British concoction, if you want to get technical. And it has the cayenne and tomato for sure. 
    Most folks seem to credit CTM to a chef from Bangladesh working in a restaurant in Glasgow and my Scottish ancestors wouldn't take too kindly to being considered "British". :)

    I only commented on the three "American" ingredients as I recently finished an interesting book titled "The Food Explorer: The True Adventures of the Globe-Trotting Botanist Who Transformed What America Eats" and it's had me thinking about where various items originated and how they have spread around the world.

    I should have provided some context with my original post.
    The context helps, for sure. Thanks for the title of the book - I'll see if my library has it.

    Lore has it that Chicken Tikka Masala was concocted in __________  (UK/Scotland/somewhere not in the Indian subcontinent) when a restaurateur took tandoori chicken, and dumped it  in a sauce made from canned tomato soup and other stuff. Sort of like the story behind potato chips. The sauce is similar to Butter Chicken, which is popular in India, but has more prominent garam masala flavors (stuff like mace, nutmeg, etc.) than Butter Chicken does. 

     Interwebz can't get it straight whether the guy was Indian or Pakistani. I'm guessing that the guy who invented CTM was Pakistani, since Bangladeshi folks don't seem to cook with cream much (if at all).

    And only here will you find a bunch of folks quibbling about how chicken tikka masala came to be :) Keeps things lively though!

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
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