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Prime Rib Roast decision needed

I'm going to do a prime rib roast this weekend and I'm wondering which would be the best way to cook it?
1.  Rotisserie on my Weber gasser or
2.  On my BGE indirect, sitting on a cradle

I've done the rotisserie method before and it's great.  Now that I have the BGE, I'm wondering if that might be a better way to go.

Any suggestions from anyone having tried it both ways?
Thanks!
Dan

Comments

  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 692
    I vote for choice #2. We did a rib roast on the egg last Christmas and it was glorious. I coated it with a generous amount of Penzey's Prime Rib Rub and set it right on the grille above a drip pan. I tossed in a couple chunks of Pecan wood for flavor. It started out at 500* to set the crust but was throttled back after about 30 minutes to 325* or so until complete. Pan drippings were deglazed and made a wonderful gravy. After a couple meals we sliced what was left paper thin and made the best Philly Cheesesteaks I ever had.
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • I've done a couple of standing rib roasts on the egg.  Wouldn't ever do it any other way.  And use the au jus that @RRP pioneered -- you won't be sorry!

    http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1203424/sunday-night-prime-rib#latest
    It's a 302 thing . . .
  • dmchicagodmchicago Posts: 1,317
    What he said.

    Philly - Kansas City - Houston - Cincinnati - Dallas - Houston - Memphis - Austin - Chicago - Austin

    Dennis - Austin,TX
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,364
    #2, low and slow smoasted. 
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 11,058
    I am guessing you didn't ask the Weber crowd? A PR is delicious from the egg. Be careful, the cook can go quicker than you might think. Enjoy at all cost. Cheers!
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    “Constantly choosing the lesser of two evils is still choosing evil.”
  • I am guessing you didn't ask the Weber crowd? A PR is delicious from the egg. Be careful, the cook can go quicker than you might think. Enjoy at all cost. Cheers!
    So true what @northGAcock says. Never much more than 2 to 2 1/2 hours. Cook at low temp and sear to finish or leave it as is. Either way it is great. @1voyager has a nice cook above, the rosemary does not have to be tied, IMO. 
    Remember a 2 rib roast will cook in about the same time as a four rib roast - it is the thickness that counts not the length (we are talking about a roast here)
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • 20stone20stone Posts: 1,619
    +1 on the reverse sear.
    Joule SV
    GE induction stove
    Gasser by the community pool
    Scale (which one of my friends refuses to use)
    Friends with BGEs and myriad other fired devices
    Charcuterie and sourdough enthusiast
    Prosciuttos in an undisclosed location

    Austin, TX
  • DMWDMW Posts: 13,288
    #2, and unwrap it now and put it in the fridge on a rack. Even just the few days you have until cooking will be enough to dry the surface. Then just slow roast in the egg with a hint of smoke (actually you can go pretty heavy on the smoke). Good chance when it's finished you'll have a nice crust without needing to sear.
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - 18.5" WSM - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • Hans61Hans61 Posts: 3,512
     Never had a rotisserie but the love egged roasts!
    “There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body.”
    Coach Finstock Teen Wolf
  • Sea2SkiSea2Ski Posts: 2,871
    What all those said above, but I do not think you have to salt/wrap 48 hrs in advance. That is optional.  And I will add that if you have the roast now, leave it uncovered in the fridge starting now for a great crust.  If you do not have it yet, unwrap and place on a cookie rack as soon as you do get it. Even 2 days helps.   
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 17,227
    +1 on simply roasting.  You can go lower 275 or at 350 and have an absolute winner so long as you get the IT. Lower/longer if you want more smoke. No experience with the rotisserie. 
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 17,744
    No suggestion from someone who has tried the prime rib both ways but here's a link that gives you a lot of insights on the roast cook:
    http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/03/beef-standing-rib-roast-prime-rib.html  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • Thanks for all suggestions.
    My concern with the BGE method is that I want to avoid the smoke flavor -  let the seasoning and meat flavor prevail. I use Royal Oak (USA) and it does leave a smoke flavor even without wood chips.
    Thanks Lou for the link - very useful.
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 13,215
    SubVet585 said:
    Thanks for all suggestions.
    My concern with the BGE method is that I want to avoid the smoke flavor -  let the seasoning and meat flavor prevail. I use Royal Oak (USA) and it does leave a smoke flavor even without wood chips.
    Thanks Lou for the link - very useful.
    Sounds to me like you need to fire up the oven. RO is definitely smokier than Rockwood but if you want smoke eliminated, cook inside. 
  • JRWhiteeJRWhitee Posts: 4,753
    Rockwood on the egg for no smoke is the way to go. I have done many, @northGAcock did one like that a couple weeks ago that was fantastic!
                                                                
    _________________________________________________
    Don't let the truth get in the way of a good story!
    Large BGE 2006, Mini Max 2014, 36" Blackstone, Anova Sous Vide
    Green Man Group 
    Johns Creek, Georgia
  • Sea2Ski said:
    What all those said above, but I do not think you have to salt/wrap 48 hrs in advance. That is optional.  And I will add that if you have the roast now, leave it uncovered in the fridge starting now for a great crust.  If you do not have it yet, unwrap and place on a cookie rack as soon as you do get it. Even 2 days helps.   
    I may try your method next time even though I'm pleased with mine. It's fun to keep trying new tricks. Do you use a rub or just uncovered for 2 or more days?
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
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