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First Brisket - opinions needed

SubVet585SubVet585 Posts: 13
So, I'm going to attempt my first brisket this weekend.
I have a USDA Choice 12 lb. brisket which I will trim and probably end up with 9 Lbs.
I figure to start the egg about 11PM and put the brisket on about 12AM placesetter on.  I will try to maintain 220 to 230 deg. I figure about 14-16 hrs?
At about 160 deg. I would pull the brisket and wrap with aluminum foil and put back on.
At maybe 190 I would take the foil off and put back on the grill until about 200-203 then pull it off, wrap in foil and place in insulated cooler until I'm ready to slice.
Anything wrong with this procedure?
If temperature probe is in the thickest part (point), wouldn't the flat become too done (or higher temp.)?
I appreciate any experienced comments.
Peace!
Dan


Comments

  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 5,387
    edited August 2017
    You'll want to put the probe in the thickest part of the flat (point will take care of itself).  I'd also try and run it closer to 260-275 unless using a pit controller.  220-230 is darn near impossible to hold for an extended period without constant babysitting.

    And, for what it's worth, I've never foiled a brisket.

    Good luck and don't force it.....BE THE BRISKET!!

    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • StillH2OEggerStillH2OEgger Posts: 1,909
    Only two briskets under my belt so I'll just share what my biggest hiccup was on the first. Also, I would also shoot for a 250 temperature on the BGE. No reason to open the possibility of fighting that all night when it doesn't really improve the final product. I also did not foil during the cook. It seems that's one of those things you might need on other types of smokers, but not necessarily with the BGE. My mistake was simply not letting the brisket rest for 20-30 minutes before the FTC after it was finished.
    Stillwater, MN
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,622
    Leave at least a quarter inch of fat on the flat if you trim.  Since that brisket is kind of small, I would leave even more so the end of the flat doesn't dry up.

    The brisket is done when you can stab the flat all over with a skewer (or thermapen probe) and it feels like butter.  If it's still tight (resistance), let it ride.

    Like others have said, don't worry about the point.  It's done when the flat is done.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • OK, good points.
    I will go with unwrapped during he stall.
    How about a drip pan with water?
  • It's not going to take that long if you wrap at 160. That will cut your time in half. The only reason to wrap in foil is to speed the cook or if the bark is getting too dark for your liking. I'm also in the 250-260 degree camp. There is no reason to cool that low- especially in a komado.

    All good advice above. Remember, the slice is as important as the cook. let it cool until it's easy to handle with your hands and slice across the grain. The grain changes in the point so go on youtube and watch the barbecue with franklin brisket videos. "The Payoff" (I think it's the 3rd in a 3 part series) will show you how to slice. Couldn't hurt to watch all 3 since this is your first. Just ignore all the parts about the cooker, you don't have one of those and most of it does not apply to komado cooking


    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,751
    Regarding stable temp-I would fire it up and get stable for a good hour (or more) after reaching your cook temp, especially if running w/o a controller.
    All good info above.
    BTW-when were you on the SSN-585?  
    Also PM sent with some info that may help with the cook.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • I was never on the SSN-585
    I srved on the SSBN-598 (George Washigton) and SSBN-654 (George Marshall).
    Are you a sub vet too?


  • Oh - 585 is my area code. :)
  • GymGym Posts: 306
    As @StillH2OEgger stated let meat rest before FTC to stop cooking and only slice as required when serving are my 2 big hiccups.
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,751
    @SubVet585 - short answer, yes I enjoyed it.  Left at the close of my final sea tour when a desk job was the only future option.    Can't be a sailor if you can't go to sea.  
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 15,986
    14-16 hrs seems a little long to me... Unlike Ron. 
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,751
    @SubVet585 - if you haven't done so, check your forum "Inbox".  Should take the worry "outta being close".  ;)
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • Jai-BoJai-Bo Posts: 566
    My longest cook was a brisket that took 18 hours....I love bark so I keep mine uncovered fer a while.  I use a spicy rub so when I do cover it, I pour a coating of honey then brown sugar it and wrap it up.  Pull time is depending on if you wanna slice it or pull it.  I love it either way so it just all depends on who I am cooking fer.  Good luck and post the results!
    Hunting-Fishing-Cookin' on my EGG! Nothing else compares!
  • Chiming in here because I'm about to try one for the first time too. Is starting it overnight a must? I was planning on foiling. Want to be ready to serve at 5 pm or so. 
  • CanDidCanDid Posts: 106
    SubVet585 said:
    OK, good points.
    I will go with unwrapped during he stall.
    How about a drip pan with water?
    Absolutely NO water. Water is used with metal smokers because they don't retain moisture and dry the protein out. Not so with the egg. Also, when it evaporates mid cook, you'll have a temperature spike.
    BGE XL
    NWArkansas
  • JPhilipJPhilip Posts: 10
    Readying my first brisket also. Is there a rule of thumb for cooking time per pound at a given temp, say 250-260?  Also, can someone detail trimming and seasoning options
    LBGE Cincinnati
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,457
    This is worth the watch. 


    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • 1voyager1voyager Posts: 298
    Thank-you for your service.  
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,465
    @JPhilip,

    As for cooking time, a reasonable guesstimate is

    220 degrees = UP TO 2 hours per pound

    275 degrees = usually about 1 hour per pound

    350 degrees (some have done it for briskets, I've only done it for pork shoulders) = about 40 minutes per pound


    I usually put my brisket on my egg at 10-11 PM at a low temp (I don't use a temp controller, just barely crack my vents and it usually settles in at 230-240) and go to bed.  I get up about 6 AM and check on things and adjust temp as needed depending on when we want to eat.

    As for the brisket trimming, the Franklin videos are money.  With that said, I think I can summarize the way I do it with 2 steps:

    1) Trim the hard fat.
    2) Trim the rest to 1/4"





    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • JPhilipJPhilip Posts: 10
    Excellent. Thanks
    LBGE Cincinnati
  • JPhilipJPhilip Posts: 10
    Are those dome or grid temps?
    LBGE Cincinnati
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 5,615
    Sounds like you're getting some great advice.  Better that it's done earlier than later.  You can rest it in a cooler for longer than you'd think.  I'll just say to be careful what videos you look at regarding trimming online.  All are NOT created equal!
    other than that I'll just say, "Go Army, Beat Navy'"
    Oh yeah, and "the damn cow drives the cook" - @lousubcap
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • I wouldn't say absolutely no on water. I've used it from time to time but generally don't. Certainly never hurt anything to use it. I will say the best beef ribs I have ever eaten in my life were done by @20stone and he used a water pan. Not saying that is why but it was enough for him to keep doing that. I'm in the "if you like it, do it" camp. give it a rip and see what it does. I think the consensus is that it does not add a lot to komodo cooking. I would probably agree with that but no hard and fast rule here as far as I'm concerned. 
    1- LGBE
    1- KBQ C-60 (The Dishwasher)
    I- Blackstone 36" Griddle
    1- Sweet-A$$ Roccbox Pizza Oven
    1-Very Understanding and Forgiving Wife
  • SamIAm2SamIAm2 Posts: 757
    I wouldn't say absolutely no on water. I've used it from time to time but generally don't. Certainly never hurt anything to use it. I will say the best beef ribs I have ever eaten in my life were done by @20stone and he used a water pan. Not saying that is why but it was enough for him to keep doing that. I'm in the "if you like it, do it" camp. give it a rip and see what it does. I think the consensus is that it does not add a lot to komodo cooking. I would probably agree with that but no hard and fast rule here as far as I'm concerned. 
    If you do use a water pan, and I usually do, take two large pieces of heavy duty aluminum foil and roll each one up, bend in a "C" shape and place them on the plate setter - legs up on opposite sides of the plate setter, then add the aluminum pan and grate. Add water after you light the coals so the ceramics and the water heat up together. You will need to add water during the cook but the drippings are useful when it comes time to reheat your slices, if that becomes necessary. :) I usually don't slice more than I need unless I am traveling with it to a pot luck. The drippings in the pan with a tight aluminum cover in the oven at 170 degrees for a couple hours before I travel do wonderful things. 
    Ubi panis, ibi patria.
    Large - Roswell rig, MiniMax-PS Woo; Cocoa, Fl.
  • GoldenQGoldenQ Posts: 225
    For your first try I would suggest the Travis Trick    This is the way I do it   method.   Purists do not care for it as much but it always comes out great and I wrap at 160 and turn up to about 350 and unwrap at about 195 to get bark better.     Search on here for brisket this is the way I do it     

    Now I know I have stepped in it but it is easier for non pros.
    I XL  and 1 Weber Kettle  And 1 Weber Q220       Outside Alvin, TX-- South of Houston
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