Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Prime Rib Success

Monty77Monty77 Posts: 653
edited April 2014 in Beef
I have made plenty of beef roasts, but have never been 100% satisfied with the final product.  I seem to be constantly searching for what I would call the perfect prime rib. 

I had attempted to create the perfect medium rare prime rib this past weekend and was very happy with the results... 
Enjoy some photos from start to finish! 

Started with a 5lb bone in Prime Rib, rubbed it with olive oil, kosher salt, fresh spicy pepper medley, some Montreal Steak Rub, and fresh minced Garlic. Let it stand for an hour while the Egg heated to 225*, set up for indirect cook with Jack Daniels Wood Chips. Placed the roast into a V-rack, sitting in a drip pan filled with fresh garlic, rosemary and beef stock. The roast cooked for approximately 3 hours until the internal temp showed 120*, I pulled the Roast, let is rest for 15 minutes while I removed the plate setter and increased the temp to 550*, place the roast back on the grill with direct heat for 1 min 30 seconds per side giving it a nice crust and sear! Removed the Prime Rib and let is sit for another 15 minutes to rest. This was the toughest part cause I really wanted to see if I nailed the perfect medium rare Prime Rib. Did one final temp check before I sliced, it read 129-132, so I knew it was going to be good! The result was an very juicy, tender, perfectly smoked medium rare Prime Rib! That beautiful pink colour from edge to edge, just what I was aiming for! Sad to report, no leftovers!

Thanks to NibbleMeThis , your recipe and instructions were great and it turned out exactly the way I had hoped. 
Large BGE 2011, XL BGE 2015, Mini Max 2015, Digi Q DX2, and member of the "North of the Border Smokin Squad" Canadian Outdoor Chef from London, Ontario, Canada

https://www.flickr.com/photos/monty77/

Comments

  • cajuncookcajuncook Posts: 99
    Good looking hunk of beef.
    Live on beautiful Lake Hartwell GA
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 13,959
    Fantastic. Reverse sear wins again!
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,473
    Might be my favorite cut.  That looks amazing.
    NOLA
  • grege345grege345 Posts: 3,515
    Dayum !!! Looks awesome. How they say. Nailed it!
    LBGE& SBGE———————————————•———————– Pennsylvania / poconos

  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,811
    edited May 2014
    Looks delicious! Glad to hear your steps, but are you willing to take a challenge the next time you try one that big? Hot tub that sucker for 90 minutes and you'll be amazed with the uniformity of the doneness of even the center most of that huge piece. Just sayin...
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • Monty77Monty77 Posts: 653
    edited May 2014
    I have cooked a 7 rib, 18 pound bone in prime rib before, did that for a large family function and did a sear, then low n slow.   That was quite a hit to the wallet, but so worth it for the experience and final product.  I have never attempted the hot tub method, sounds like a good challenge for a smaller roast!    
    Large BGE 2011, XL BGE 2015, Mini Max 2015, Digi Q DX2, and member of the "North of the Border Smokin Squad" Canadian Outdoor Chef from London, Ontario, Canada

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/monty77/
  • SkiddymarkerSkiddymarker Posts: 8,299
    edited May 2014
    Monty77 said:
    I have cooked a 7 rib, 18 pound bone in prime rib before, did that for a large family function and did a sear, then low n slow.   That was quite a hit to the wallet, but so worth it for the experience and final product.  I have never attempted the hot tub method, sounds like a good challenge for a smaller roast!    
    Understand what you are saying, but - 2 ribs or 7 ribs, it all cooks in the same time. It is the thickness of the roast, not the length. The reverse sear is easier to control, the slow part of the cook is at low temps and things happen very slowly, much like @RRP hot tub. You can get it almost edge to edge, then crust the outside. I used to oven sear everything, until I tried the reverse sear. Hot tubbing is a reverse sear. 

    @Monty77 - beautiful looking roast. 
    Delta B.C. - Move over coffee, this is job for alcohol!
  • Monty77Monty77 Posts: 653
    Oh, I am converted to the reverse sear permanently after my last few attempts and the excellent results.  I misunderstood the hot tubbin reference, my mistake.  I make a few roasts a month and this will be my go to method going forward, all features of it were right on with my prferecnes.  
    Large BGE 2011, XL BGE 2015, Mini Max 2015, Digi Q DX2, and member of the "North of the Border Smokin Squad" Canadian Outdoor Chef from London, Ontario, Canada

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/monty77/
  • SidZer0SidZer0 Posts: 45
    [/clicks star]
    Jax, FL
  • GK59GK59 Posts: 501
     A hunk of Burnin Love!

    Smitty's Kid's BBQ

    Bay City,MI

  • SpartanPrideSpartanPride Posts: 159
    RRP said:
    Looks delicious! Glad to hear your steps, but are you willing to take a challenge the next time you try one that big? Hot tub that sucker for 90 minutes and you'll be amazed with the uniformity of the doneness of even the center most of that huge piece. Just sayin...
    @RRP...can you elaborate on the hot tub?  I'm thinking about throwing on a Prime Rib for mothers day tomorrow.  Haven't done one yet.  Would you recommend that for a first timer? thanks!
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,811
    edited May 2014
    RRP said:
    Looks delicious! Glad to hear your steps, but are you willing to take a challenge the next time you try one that big? Hot tub that sucker for 90 minutes and you'll be amazed with the uniformity of the doneness of even the center most of that huge piece. Just sayin...
    @RRP...can you elaborate on the hot tub?  I'm thinking about throwing on a Prime Rib for mothers day tomorrow.  Haven't done one yet.  Would you recommend that for a first timer? thanks!
    I prefer to use a type of Sous Vide more commonly called Hot Tubbing on this board. At least 90 minutes before you plan to egg the meat submerge the meat still sealed in the plastic bag into a container of hot water from the tap. The desired temp of the water should be checked from time to time during the first hour and should be over 100 degrees. I find my tap water runs about 125 degrees. I also find that I have to change the water at least 3 to 4 times in that hour. OTOH if you use a small cooler with a tight lid I find I can go over an hour with no need to refill it.  Then when the meat goes on the internal meat temperature should already be above 100. That way you will not have a dark reddish-blue cold center. I then just follow the normal reverse sear method. HTH
    image
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • SpartanPrideSpartanPride Posts: 159
    RRP said:
    RRP said:
    Looks delicious! Glad to hear your steps, but are you willing to take a challenge the next time you try one that big? Hot tub that sucker for 90 minutes and you'll be amazed with the uniformity of the doneness of even the center most of that huge piece. Just sayin...
    @RRP...can you elaborate on the hot tub?  I'm thinking about throwing on a Prime Rib for mothers day tomorrow.  Haven't done one yet.  Would you recommend that for a first timer? thanks!
    I prefer to use a type of Sous Vide more commonly called Hot Tubbing on this board. At least 90 minutes before you plan to egg the meat submerge the meat still sealed in the plastic bag into a container of hot water from the tap. The desired temp of the water should be checked from time to time during the hour and should be over 100 degrees. I find my tap water runs about 125 degrees. I also find that I have to change the water at least 3 to 4 times in that hour. OTOH if you use a small cooler with a tight lid I find I can go over an hour with no need to refill it.  Then when the meat goes on the internal meat temperature should already be above 100. That way you will not have a dark reddish-blue cold center. I then just follow the normal reverse sear method. HTH
    image
    Still sealed in the plastic bag...you are saying submerge the entire 6lb roast in the water in the packaging it came in?  Sorry if that's a new person question.  Haven't done sous vide yet.  Thanks as always!
  • RRPRRP Posts: 21,811
    edited May 2014
    Oh no! It needs to be in a new clean, food safe plastic bag, with a tight water proof seal like with a bread twisty. Press the air out so the meat sinks and doesn't float. You do not want the bag to leak. If your meat is now in a tightly sealed cryovac you can leave it in that, but if it is on a tray and wrapped then that will not work!
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • pescadorzihpescadorzih Posts: 853
    Beautiful job on the PR. I haven't done one yet. I've got to do one one of these weekends. Maybe Memorial Day.
    SE PA
    XL, Mini max
  • tickbytetickbyte Posts: 24
    OHHH Man!!!  That looks good!
    Large Egg.   Pflugerville, Texas  I Also brew my own beer. 
  • Mr_EggMr_Egg Posts: 13
    Looks brilliant.
  • Very nice cook. Looks so good I am trying it out tonight. Going with a few different spices but otherwise going with what you did. Thanks for posting this. 
  • Awesome, great photos.
    Toledo, OH

    XL BGE (December 2014), 2 burner weber gas
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 9,820
    It looks perfect from here.  Beautiful pics as well.  I can see you took some iphone shots and then some "money shots" with the cannon ;)


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • Great looking cook!  =)

    I'll be trying your (and Nibble's) recipe tonight for Easter dinner. I hope my results are close to yours.
    LBGE, MM, KABs

    Fort Worth, TX

    If it's worth doing, do it low and slow.
  • SammiSammi Posts: 486
    @Monty77  Nice cook an photos.  :clap: 
    Sudbury, Ontario
  • I just had to write another reply of thanks. I followed @Monty77 's recipe and instruction and the first prime rib was a great success. Impressed the family and while there were a few leftovers (lucky me) they will not last long.

    Cheers to you!



    -bE
    LBGE, MM, KABs

    Fort Worth, TX

    If it's worth doing, do it low and slow.
  • Monty77Monty77 Posts: 653
    @TexasBelliott That beef looks amazing, job well done!   ;)
    Large BGE 2011, XL BGE 2015, Mini Max 2015, Digi Q DX2, and member of the "North of the Border Smokin Squad" Canadian Outdoor Chef from London, Ontario, Canada

    https://www.flickr.com/photos/monty77/
  • StillH2OEggerStillH2OEgger Posts: 1,838
    That looks delicious. Love prime rib.
    Stillwater, MN
  • bhedges1987bhedges1987 Posts: 3,201
    I've honestly never had a big hunk of prime rib. Only that variety that might come on a sub sandwich. I got try one sometime. 

    Kansas City, Missouri
    Large Egg
    Mini Egg

    "All we have to decide is what to do with the time that is given to us" - Gandalf


Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.