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Enameled Cast Iron Skillet

My wife has a blood disorder called hemochromatosis which is very high iron levels. She controls it by donating blood every couple of months or so, Regardless, I am prevented from using regular cast iron cookware. I am wanting to cook steak on my Egg using a pan ( to get an even sear and crust, etc) but all of the stainless steel pans I see have handles that are too long and thus prevent me from closing the top of my LBGE.

There are enameled cast iron pans that have the shorter handle just like the regular cast iron pans. My question is whether I can use such on the Egg cooking at high heat direct (500* or higher) Any issues with the enamel? I would not think so since they are designed for cooking on indoor cooktops at I would imagine to be fairly high heat.

Thanks.

Springram
Spring, Texas


LBGE and Mini
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Comments

  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012
    I wouldn't expose them to that high of heat personally.

    You could get a carbon steel pan like a debuyer instead.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263
    Avoid the CI and use a 1/4" thick steel, like the baking steel.  
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • GrannyX4GrannyX4 Posts: 1,479
    Try Emile Henry safe for high heat. ;;)
    Every day is a bonus day and every meal is a banquet in Winter Springs, Fl !
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001
    I've used a cuisnart ECI pot for years and go over 500 all the time.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012
    I've used a cuisnart ECI pot for years and go over 500 all the time.
    direct or indirect?

    Everything I have read says not to go over 400-450 or the ceramic can crack due to thermal expansion differences with the metal.
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001
    Both. I try to stick with direct but I've done both. I've bad my lodge ECI up over 500 a few times too.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263
    edited April 2014

    There are variables with 500 dome and it's corresponding grate temp.  Airflow, fresh/used lump, whether the temp is climbing, or the egg is stabilized, and just the simple fact the grate is so much closer to the fire etc etc.

    There was a pic recently of a smoking hot white CI skillet that easily must have been double the 500 dome.  Enamelled CI, even the "high heat" stuff, will not hold up to this, period.  With a hematological disorder at your family table, why take the risk of compromising the finish and leaking iron into your food at said table?   

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263

     Blood disorders are a specialty, and I have experience helping people with them.  So I can get passionate when others tend to medically advise, especially when a person's health is at risk.

    Advising someone to go ahead and use CI with a known blood disorder, is (and I'm putting it mildly here) as(s)inine.

    Like Eggcelsior mentioned, Lodge has a carbon steel line with carbon steel handles that can be cut off.  I have always wanted to get one, but haven't pulled the trigger yet.  You can get 8,10, or 12" depending on your size preference.  Seasoning is identical to CI, and I have heard they perform almost the same. 

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • DMWDMW Posts: 12,463
    I know it doesn't have the same ability for holding heat like CI, but I've used a stainless steel griddle to sear steaks a couple times and it does work.

    I have one from Little Griddle:


    My Facebook Page where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - 18.5" WSM - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001
    I do t see where anyone advised him to do a thing. He asked a question and the folks answered.

    Chill man. He's a big boy and can take care of his own blood.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263
    edited April 2014

    I wasn't referring to you Travis

    "Try Emile Henry, safe for high heat"

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001
    Focker said:

    I wasn't referring to you Travis

    I know. I'm just trolling a little. This place has been boring.
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • LitLit Posts: 6,893
    I use my le crueset enameled skillet on the mini all the time for blackening fish. It gets over 600 on the IR thermometer and its fine.
  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 1,367

    Focker said:

    I wasn't referring to you Travis

    I know. I'm just trolling a little. This place has been boring.
    @travisstrick‌ You should order a tshirt. That seemed to liven things up!
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, SMALL, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 16,939
    edited April 2014
    +1 carbon steel or SS pan. Not the same as c.i. pan but, will get the job done. And after some practice you'll be good to go. Ya I'm a Ramsay mark :-)
    How to Cook a Steak in a Pan - Gordon Ramsay:
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012
    I wasn't referring to you Travis
    I know. I'm just trolling a little. This place has been boring.
    I guess you missed the basketball thread.
  • SpringramSpringram Posts: 430
    Thanks to everyone for their advise to my question. I went to Sur La Table late today and following 
    @Focker's advice, purchased a Baking Stone.  It measures 14" X14" x1/4" of steel. Made by the original Baking Stone company for Sur LaTable.

    This will meet my needs for both searing cooking a steaks but also provides a nice griddle surface for other cooks. At the same time, it allows for the avoidance of the issues encountered with cast iron.

    Springram
    Spring, Texas


    LBGE and Mini
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263
    edited April 2014

    Tonight's ribeye dinner @Springram, inspired by your inquiries.  350 dome.

    The Baking Steel is a versatile tool, you will enjoy it.

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 9,860
    Springham what size egg do you have? Is the sur la table a 14 inch square? That will fit an xl but not a large.


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263
    edited April 2014

    Good catch SP,

    He's got a Large.

    @Springram,

    DO NOT USE IT, RETURN TO SUR LA TABLE AND ORDER HERE, 14", 15", and 16" will all work.  I have the 16", and would recommend the 15".

    http://bakingsteel.com/shop/

     

     

     

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • travisstricktravisstrick Posts: 5,001

    Springham what size egg do you have? Is the sur la table a 14 inch square? That will fit an xl but not a large.

    Don't you mean the "no regrets" model?
    Be careful, man! I've got a beverage here.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012

    +1 carbon steel or SS pan. Not the same as c.i. pan but, will get the job done. And after some practice you'll be good to go. Ya I'm a Ramsay mark :-)
    How to Cook a Steak in a Pan - Gordon Ramsay:

    Carbon steel actually does a better job than CI. More efficient heat transfer.
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,263

    Better? No

    More efficient?  Yes

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • How about a pizza steel?
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,662
    @Eggcelsior @Focker

    Saying one material is better than the other without specifying what the hell we're trying to do is like saying cars are better than trucks or horses better than dogs. 

    For sauteing and frying (for example), I'd rather have steel, so would most professional cooks.  And you don't see people making corn bread in steel pans.  Everyone, use the right tool for the job.  For searing, cast iron probably does a better job, but it's a one-shot pony and the refractory time doesn't make it good for a line cook. 
    ______________________________________________
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    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,114
    @Springram:

    I think the steel option is your best bet given your concerns. I'm a cheapskate, so I'll throw out the idea of getting a steel disc cut to whatever size you want. Go to a place like SSS (there is one up on the North side of town somewhere) and ask for a disc of A36 steel, 3/8" thick, whatever size you want. 

    Just a thought. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,662
    +1 on @caliking 's suggestion.  I almost couldn't see the forest through the trees. 

    I have some home-made baking steels that I love.  One is core10, the other some unknown alloy, probably uranium, from an inductively coupled plasma spectrophotometer.  Both work great.  But you can buy baking steels.  I can drop them from a plane and they won't break.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SpringramSpringram Posts: 430
    Whew, thanks guys! You are correct. The diagonal is what makes it wrong. Should have known. Have not even taken out of the package.

    Will order the 15".

    Thanks again.

    Springram
    Spring, Texas
    LBGE and Mini
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012
    Focker said:

    Better? No

    More efficient?  Yes

    Please explain. It's more efficient and responsive to heat. I suppose it has less "wiggle room" than CI due to the lower thermal mass. I only meant better when referring to efficiency, as the pan heats back up faster than CI when browning/searing.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,012

    @Eggcelsior @Focker

    Saying one material is better than the other without specifying what the hell we're trying to do is like saying cars are better than trucks or horses better than dogs. 

    For sauteing and frying (for example), I'd rather have steel, so would most professional cooks.  And you don't see people making corn bread in steel pans.  Everyone, use the right tool for the job.  For searing, cast iron probably does a better job, but it's a one-shot pony and the refractory time doesn't make it good for a line cook. 

    @nolaegghead, thanks for this. I didn't see it before I posted my stipulations on why I said steel is better. No wonder we are "cool like that" :-*
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