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wanting to do my first brisket, need some help

Wanting to try this but having some reservations, first off, the masses here on the forum, say do a packer. So I called a few butcher shops here, one doesn't do packer, just flats. They other shop will do a packer, about 12-13#. Now comes the financial decision. The packer will cost about $45-50 Canadian. I am worried that I will screw my first crack at this up, (trying to enjoy the journey, but would still have to explain to SWMBO if it is a flop. )The other thing is there is just the two of us, so how many pounds of meat after the shrinkage would we have left? Won't be a problem if it turns out terrible, it will go in the garbage, explanation to my better half. If it turns out then we are going to have brisket coming out of our ears. Don't want to invite friends or family over to be Guinea Pigs just yet.
What do y'all have to say.  If the price of the brisket would be more like what some of you down south pay, I wouldn't be hedging as much.
Hey Skiddy where have you bought brisket before??
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Comments

  • grege345grege345 Posts: 3,515
    Lots of ideas for leftover brisket. you can certainly freeze the leftovers for the future. Stew. Chilli.etc. as for the cook be confident that this forum is behind you. Simple salt and pepper will do. As long as it probes well and up around the 200 degree mark. Watching Franklin videos on YouTube helped me along with this forum
    LBGE& SBGE———————————————•———————– Pennsylvania / poconos

  • Agreed about the leftovers. While it's hard to get a brisket to come out just right, even a bad brisket once chopped and made into stew, chili, or mixed with bbq sauce for chopped beef will be awesome. Also a second vote for the Aaron Franklin videos. That's what I go by.
  • thanks, will watch the video. 
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  • Do the whole packer, no question. I don't think it's terribly difficult to do a pretty good brisket if you just follow Franklin's approach (and you don't even need to wrap it - I suggest simply leaving it on). The challenge is in getting an amazing brisket, where most to all of the flat is perfect. Even some of the more experienced people here don't get that every time.
    "If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

    "The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand." - DT


  • @JohninCarolina. Thanks for the support. Guess I am going to have to "man up" and give it a try.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 25,028
    Sir I will try to answer some of your questions and give what advice I can. As to the brisket a packer is preferd but a large unscalped flat will work just fine. Do avoid the small scalped flats. When you trim dont fuss over it to much just be sure to remove the hard fat(it will feel like knots). The hard fat will not render and will sometimes impart a musky taste to the meat. As far a rub I keep it basic salt, pepper and garlic salt. You can get as fancy as you want if you are trying to make a meteroite but the basic rub works well. Next if you are not going to boat it I would recommend that you inject it. I prefer injecting over boating but thats just me.I like to let it sit in the fridge over night after injecting.As to cooking I like to cook between 215 and 225. As to your question on time that depends on several factors. Examples-Dry cooking chamber,moist cooking chamber, natural draft, convection or reverse flow. All these play a part in time. As you are using the egg it is a natural draft semi moist enviroment so at the above temps you are looking at 1 1/2-2 hours a pound. You can google brisket injection and hundreds will come up. If you dont see one to your liking you can message me and I will be glad to share one with you that was given to me at the 1997 Royal. I still use it to this day. I hope I have answered some of your questions and wish you good luck my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • henapplehenapple Posts: 15,986
    Most of all...don't ever use the word "shrinkage" here. Just do it. You'll be fine.
    Green egg, dead animal and alcohol. The "Boro".. TN 
  • minniemohminniemoh Posts: 2,105
    Don't be afraid to invite friends. A brisket cook is something that most people will never even attempt. If it turns out, you'll be a legend! If it doesn't turn out perfect, a quick chop and sauce and you've still got a very good meal. From my experience, YOU will be the worst critic at the meal. 

    Your getting a pretty good price on it too. 
    :D
    L x2, M, S, Mini and a Blackstone 36. She says I have enough now....
    eggAddict from MN!
  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    edited February 2014
    • Buy a brisket packer...get one that's malleable and super floppy.
    • Trim fat cap to 1/4 inch.  Get rid of all hard fat.  Good example right here.    
    • Stabilize fire at 250 dome
    • Season brisket and toss in egg with wood chunk(s).  Oak is the best but i'm from Texas
    • If you have a Maverick or pit controller, insert probe in the thickest part of the flat.
    • Check for tenderness at 190...you'll likely pull at around 195-205
    • Pull when the probe inserts the thickest part of the flat like butter
    • Rest the brisket for 1 hour minimum
    A few cliche BBQ lines:
    • If you're looking, you're not cooking
    • Cook to temp, not time
    At 250, you're prolly going to average about 1.5 hours per pound.  That's not an exact science though as every brisket is different so just monitor it closely at the back end.  This isn't competition, so please don't inject your brisket.  Maybe, just maybe, I could see doing that if you can only get a flat in your area.  

    In regards to left overs.  Turn half the flat into chop and vacuum seal it in 8oz packs and toss them in the freezer.  Pull em out for lazy nights as they make great sammies or is fabulous on a baked potato.  Cut the point in half, vacuum seal one half and toss it in the freezer.  This video will make sense when I say cut it in half.  He starts cutting the brisket at 8min.  That leaves you with half the point and flat to enjoy for a few days.  Try some brisket nachos with your leftovers.
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • Y'all are awesome. Thank you for all the help and encouragement. I am going to give it a shot. "Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained" 

    And I promise not to use the S word again.
    ;)
    @SGH, boating,? do you mean using AF pan and liquid in the pan? Could you elaborate please.
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  • SGHSGH Posts: 25,028
    Yes sir boating is putting it in a foil pan. I prefer not to do this but thats just me. If I can help in any way just let me know my friend.

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 939
    Where in Canada are you.? Gerhard
  • smokesniffersmokesniffer Posts: 2,016
    edited February 2014
    Outside of Vancouver BC, in the Fraser Valley, little place called Chilliwack
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  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,426
    @Cazzy - Do you FTC a brisket?  I was at Walmart Sunday and they marked their brisket down to $1.89 a lb that equaled out to around $20 for a packer!  I have said I will not do a brisket until I get a controller of sort. 
    ------------------------------
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  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    I will FTC if I'm holding it more than 1 hour or if I pull it a smidge before butter.

    That's a great price! Many have made briskests without temp controllers. It's usually the peeps who run sub 225 that run into probs. go for 250 and it should ride through the night. I will say that lil Steven held 200 overnight so it's possible if you build your fire right. Either way, don't think you have to wait.
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • I wasn't very happy with my first brisket, but it definitely didn't go to waste.  I ended up making pizza out of some if it.  BBQ sauce instead of tomato with a mix of cheddar and mozzarella cheese, with a little chopped up red onion.  Can't wait to do another brisket just so I can make pizza again with the leftovers.
    LBGE in Arlington, TX

    Thanks and Gig'em
  • Y'all are awesome. Thank you for all the help and encouragement. I am going to give it a shot. "Nothing Ventured, Nothing Gained" 

    And I promise not to use the S word again.
    ;)
    @SGH, boating,? do you mean using AF pan and liquid in the pan? Could you elaborate please.
    Man it's hard to find brisket here that has enough intra-muscular fat and connective to get really juicy results. Nothing wrong with injecting at all.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • Ok here is a picture of the brisket I picked up today, it doesn't look like what I have seen here, it seems a little smaller, and not a thick. Maybe a younger animal. To me it seems like the point is off. What do you say. The butcher did cut it for me as I watched. It was quite long, no way it would fit on the egg. He cut about 8" of the back part of the flat.(I believe it is the flat) This puppy weighs in at 6.5 pounds. I am wondering how when some say that they have a 13 pound on, how it fits in a large.
    The plan is to have this on Thursday night for supper. Does indirect @ 250 for about 10 hours, give or take sound right. I will use a probe so will go with an IT of 200 and pull and rest??
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  • Here's the other side. I don't have any way to inject, so what should I do, Travis method, or Franklin method. The more I look at this meat on the fat cap side, I wonder if that bump is the point, and I should have had the butcher NOT cut off so much of the flat side, sorry for all the questions, Went to three different stores and saw three different types of cut and 3 different stories.
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  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    edited February 2014
    In the 2nd pic, it looks like he cut the majority of the point off. A lot of butchers view the point of the brisket as a bad cut of beef, so he likely assumed you didn't want or need it.
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • Thanks Cazzy. Appreciate it. 
    Would it be best to boat the brisket, know that a lot of that point is gone??
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  • Just off the top of my head, how about rolling and tying? Caz is right, he took the lower part of the point off.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    Looking again...there is plenty of point there. It does looks like he cut all the way past most of the hard fat pretty much removed the layer of fat that separates the point from the flat

    In this pic, you can see the remnants of the rendered fat that runs between the flat and the point.

    photo DSC_6221_zps36747150.jpg

    He saved you some money...but he mangled your cut and I'm not sure it will cook like a whole packer. Your approach is fine though.
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • @Cazzy thanks Sir. Love it when the Egghead Pooba's help out the grasshoppers. :D
    @LS, thank you too. Interesting you say that, the butcher did just that, he rolled it when he wrapped it. Are you saying to roll it, tie and then grill it like a roast?

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  • @LS if I roll it, I am forfeiting  bark, am I not? Is this because of the bad cut of meat?
    Learning curve,  STRAIGHT UP!
    :((
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  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    I almost think it wouldn't make difference if you finished the job and seperate them and cooked them independently.

    He's likely your best source in your area so next time ask for one in a cryovac or a untrimmed whole brisket ie don't let him cut your meat next time!
    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • No not at all. Brisket will be real tough at high temps. I was thinking that if you started at the flat and rolled into the point you might get a benefit from what fat and connective tissue is left of the point. I don't give advice on brisket cause they are hit and miss for me. I really think Canadian beef doesn't have enough fat for traditional brisket. I have nailed a few with injecting and very low temps. I was kind of hoping someone else would chime in on that idea.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • cazzycazzy Posts: 9,070
    You could go mad scientist like cen tex. Seperate them, then reattach with bacon between the cuts and a nice dosing of meat glue. Lol.

    Just a hack that makes some $hitty BBQ....
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 17,609
    @cazzy-certainly no butcher in Texas would commit such a brisket point sin...now the above is a hack job of first order proportions.  
    That said, Fat cap down and checking the thickest part of the flat and you can get at least a triple...

    @smokesniffer--with brisket, temperature is only a guide (unlike other low&slow cooks).  The finish-line is when you can probe the thickest part of the flat w/o much resistance in either direction.  Most start to check around 190*F and most will not achieve the right feel til around 200*F+/-.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • Oh boy, let the fun begin.
    @Cazzy, the butcher brought out this loong length of meat, there was no way it would fit on my large, that is when he started carving, even now the length of this piece has to be close to 18". And that threw me too. 
    @LS West Jet flight to Abbotsford, I will pick you up.
    :))
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