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Ribeye versus NY Strip

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Teefus
Teefus Posts: 1,208
Am I the only guy that likes Strip Steaks better than Ribeye? I know that fat is flavor and I love me some flavor but I find ribeye a little loose and greasy unless cooked to a medium well. I like strips as they're firmer at medium/medium rare. I noticed last weekend that when I reheated a half a ribeye for steak and eggs that cooking some more of the fat off really created a better eating experience. I know well done beef is heresy but my taste buds like what they like. If it's tender and juicy I don't really mind how much pink is left. Well, most of the time  ;)
Michiana, South of the border.

Comments

  • lousubcap
    lousubcap Posts: 32,363
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    This may be like a lump thread downstream.
    I appreciate your reasoning as it makes sense to me.
    But to vote I am ribeye all the way and ideally no more than 125*F.  Never thought of a ribeye as loose and greasy (the same can't be said across the board...) but like bourbon, everyone has their own preferences. 
    Will be watching this thread. 
    Louisville; Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!  Seems I'm livin in a transitional period.
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,754
    edited August 2023
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    internal temp of strip steak 122f, ribeye 127f. bone in stripsteak can be slightly better but theres always that tough one that shows up eventually.   dry aged, ribeye wins hands down
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • Foghorn
    Foghorn Posts: 9,841
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    Filet.

    I have spoken.

     =) 

    XXL BGE, Karebecue, Klose BYC, Chargiller Akorn Kamado, Weber Smokey Mountain, Grand Turbo gasser, Weber Smoky Joe, and the wheelbarrow that my grandfather used to cook steaks from his cattle

    San Antonio, TX

  • StillH2OEgger
    StillH2OEgger Posts: 3,746
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    They both have their place and I think it all comes down to personal preference. These are the two options we definitely eat the most and price in my area is similar most of the time, so I will grab whatever has the better marbling. A ribeye definitely holds up better if it ends up getting overcooked.
    Stillwater, MN
  • RRP
    RRP Posts: 25,892
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    I too have never thought of ribeye being loose and greasy nor would I ever cook one to medium! Now, maybe I just don't notice the grease since I always have a small dish of melted butter sitting on a candle burner to dip most of my bites in! =)
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • JohnInCarolina
    JohnInCarolina Posts: 30,964
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    Foghorn said:
    Filet.

    I have spoken.

     =) 
    A perfectly seasoned and cooked filet is pretty hard to beat.   I hear you on this one.
    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike
  • Botch
    Botch Posts: 15,479
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    Last months Cooks Illustrated talked about the ribeye "cap", which is the thin curved piece separated by a thick fat layer from the "eye".  They suggested it has a noticeably different flavor from the eye, and to serve them separated.
     

     
    When I first moved here to UT all my Active Duty buddies would call me when they were here TDY to get together for dinner, and they always wanted to go to the Prairie Schooner, a popular steak house.  Like most steak houses it was too dark to see that line of fat, and I quit eating ribeyes (and eventually steaks altogether, once a month was too much for me).  
    Their trout was pretty good.   
    _____________

    Remember when teachers used to say 'You won't have a calculator everywhere you go'?  Well, we showed them.


  • ColtsFan
    ColtsFan Posts: 6,342
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    Team ribeye all the way here. 
    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, PK Original, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • stv8r
    stv8r Posts: 1,127
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    Yes you have lost your mind lol.  Ribeye will always be superior to a strip.  Yes maybe an exception here and there but as a rule ribeye always wins. 
  • pgprescott
    pgprescott Posts: 14,544
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    Have been a ribeye guy for decades but I have discover the beauty of the Prime strip. A prime strip is as good as it gets. Love the ribeye, cap, flat iron, and even the filet, but the thick cut Prime NY strip is tough to beat 
  • Legume
    Legume Posts: 14,623
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    It's always been NY for me. I do love a filet, especially with a little blue cheese broiled on top.  Ribeye cap is really good by itself.  I like lots of others, but straight up ribeyes aren't something I ever choose to cook.
  • JohnInCarolina
    JohnInCarolina Posts: 30,964
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    Now, a dry aged ribeye on the other hand… that’s what I’m talking about.
    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike
  • lousubcap
    lousubcap Posts: 32,363
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    @Botch - parsing the ribeye cap is almost like cheating.  That is the best part of a ribeye and wins hands-down!
    Louisville; Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!  Seems I'm livin in a transitional period.
  • GrateEggspectations
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    Each have their place, IMO, but it’s at least 90% filet in this household. Generally, I like uniform muscle tissue absent big pockets of fat on any steak I’m having, as I enjoy consistency from one bite to the next. 

    At the risk of sounding blasphemous, I have taken to trimming the surface fat off of all my steaks pretty aggressively. Standard procedure is buy the sub-primal, trim, portion out the steaks, do trimming of the surface fat of individual steaks as needed, season, vac seal and freeze. Then they’re ready to go straight to sous vide from the freezer, or can be thawed and are instantly ready for the grill.

    I’ve found that the trim results in more even caramelization of the surface during cooking and retains more of the rub. While you’d think you’d end up with a less juicy steak, I haven’t found that at all, as surface fat just drips off (or is cut off during consumption), and surface fat doesn’t penetrate the meat during cooking anyway.
  • Foghorn
    Foghorn Posts: 9,841
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    Each have their place, IMO, but it’s at least 90% filet in this household. Generally, I like uniform muscle tissue absent big pockets of fat on any steak I’m having, as I enjoy consistency from one bite to the next. 

    At the risk of sounding blasphemous, I have taken to trimming the surface fat off of all my steaks pretty aggressively. Standard procedure is buy the sub-primal, trim, portion out the steaks, do trimming of the surface fat of individual steaks as needed, season, vac seal and freeze. Then they’re ready to go straight to sous vide from the freezer, or can be thawed and are instantly ready for the grill.

    I’ve found that the trim results in more even caramelization of the surface during cooking and retains more of the rub. While you’d think you’d end up with a less juicy steak, I haven’t found that at all, as surface fat just drips off (or is cut off during consumption), and surface fat doesn’t penetrate the meat during cooking anyway.
    I did something similar when I was gifted two large (over 25 pounds each) ribeye sub-primals.  We don't love ribeye as a steak so we saved them as steaks but often used them for fajitas, birria tacos, etc after trimming all the fat.  I know that some are cringing just reading this but for us, it was the best use of ribeye we've ever found.  On the rank of steaks, I'd go with 1) filet, 2) tie between a good sirloin, tri-tip (if that counts), and picanha, 3) tie between flat iron, hangar, flank, and NY strip, 4) ribeye.

    I know - this clearly represents a failing on my part to not appreciate the ribeye the way others do.

    XXL BGE, Karebecue, Klose BYC, Chargiller Akorn Kamado, Weber Smokey Mountain, Grand Turbo gasser, Weber Smoky Joe, and the wheelbarrow that my grandfather used to cook steaks from his cattle

    San Antonio, TX

  • CornfedMA
    CornfedMA Posts: 491
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    Oddly enough, ribeye has been my default steak nearly my entire life, until I hit 40. Don’t know what changed specifically, but now it’s a NY strip. Not that I won’t eat a ribeye or filet, but given the choice of the 3- NY every time. I’ve also started embracing a number of other cuts- flank, skirt, Denver, etc etc etc. At the same time, when it comes to a roast, NOTHING beats a prime rib. Especially the cap with a well seasoned crust! 
  • JohnInCarolina
    JohnInCarolina Posts: 30,964
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    Maybe we can all agree that, regardless of your personal preference of cut, the only true blasphemy is overcooking it.  
    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,754
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    prime porterhouse, why decide between two cuts. that and tying a fillet cut to cook it more even just seems to be that extra step that leans me over to the side of strip/ribeye
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • Corv
    Corv Posts: 365
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    I like the NY strips. For me, like with the OP, a ribeye is way too fatty. To me, it's just not something worth eating. 
    Mostly, though, I cook a tri-tip or flap steak, stick it in the fridge overnight and slice it thin for sandwiches the next day. Delicious!
    Somewhere on the Colorado Front Range
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,754
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    those with the fat issues, are you buying prime ribeye. a choice cut is better with those in my opinion
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • Legume
    Legume Posts: 14,623
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    I can't remember my dad ever grilling a ribeye, always NY.  I'm sure that's a big part of it for me.
  • Yno
    Yno Posts: 529
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    Maybe we can all agree that, regardless of your personal preference of cut, the only true blasphemy is overcooking it.  
    Or ketchup.
    XL BGE in San Jose, CA. Also a Pit Barrel Cooker, a Cal Flame P4 gasser, and lots of toys including the first ever Flame Boss 300 in the wild. And a new Flame Boss 500.
  • HeavyG
    HeavyG Posts: 10,348
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    Ribeye vs. NY strip? Meh. The only good steak is one that has been ground into a burger.


    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ― Philip K. Diçk




  • bdalqasmal
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    Everyone's got their groove when it comes to steak. I had this funny moment last summer. Grilled up a ribeye, and you know how it can get a bit greasy. Tried the reheating trick too, but it still felt a bit too loose.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,524
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  • GoldenQ
    GoldenQ Posts: 566
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    I may be the only one but my preference is a prime sirloin then an Angus strip, then Angus rib eye.  I think Angus has better flavor for the strip and ribeye.   I always cook to about 145 which is slightly pink.  I also think ribeye cooked to med rare or less is spongy.   
    I XL  and 1 Weber Kettle  And 1 Weber Q220       Outside Alvin, TX-- South of Houston
  • TechsasJim
    TechsasJim Posts: 1,909
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    I do like strips when making a steak salad.    If the steak is plated it will be a ribeye.   
    LBGE, 28” BS, Weber Kettle, HCI 7.8 SE Texas
  • bdalqasmal
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    Everyone's got their groove when it comes to steak. I had this funny moment last summer. Grilled up a ribeye, and you know how it can get a bit greasy. Tried the reheating trick too, but it still felt a bit too loose.

     Then, stumbled upon FATTYCOW, explored their range, and found this fantastic strip cut. The texture at medium/medium rare was spot-on, firm and juicy. It's become my go-to since.
  • Canugghead
    Canugghead Posts: 11,524
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