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beef tenderloin - sound ok?

NDG
NDG Posts: 2,431
This 7lb beef tenderloin showed up.  I assume it would need some trimming, but after a few youtube videos like this one, I now realize it needs decent amount of butchering.  Should be fine, but kind of shocked in the amount of labor needed before cook.  Anyway, I will be serving this XMAS dinner, but really do not want to slave around the BGE in 5 degree weather (that rules out APL recipes) . . . so wondering if anyone has killer recipe to consider?

Thinking about this recipe, except I will sear on the BGE and use the trimmings for the fond.  Thoughts/suggestions ?  Thanks!
  



Columbus, OH

“There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is” 

Comments

  • SonVolt
    SonVolt Posts: 3,314
    edited December 2019
    Having never cooked a whole beef tenderloin, why can't you just cook it as-is? I can understand the trimming/butchering if I was catering/retail etc, but why is it needed for the home?
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • Photo Egg
    Photo Egg Posts: 12,110
    Your video link above shows extensive trimming because the butcher is trimming for prime retail cuts.

    Below is a link to a cook I did a couple months ago. 
    I kept the entire primal in one piece. Trimmed the heavy fat and silver as much as I could and then folded the thinner tail piece under and tied it all up.
    No complaints from the friends at the party. And cooked it on their kettle grill.
    https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1219903/beef-tenderloin#latest

    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • GoooDawgs
    GoooDawgs Posts: 1,060
    Trim it up and do a beef wellington with it. You can sear it and have it in the pastry the day before, and day of Christmas you can just throw it in the oven.  One of my favorite cooks!
    Milton, GA 
    XL BGE & FB300
  • Sea2Ski
    Sea2Ski Posts: 4,088
    Tenderloin is a simple cook. So is the butchering.  I watched the videos. The trimming one is very good. The lines where you cut are really simple to follow even for someone who has never done it before. How long for a newbie? I would say 30 minute max. (Your second one will take 15-20 and your third < 15 from start to finish). 

    The chain is easy to find and separate. You can almost do it with your fingers. Cut it off and set aside.  Then remove the head - it is the large muscle at the fat end that looks like a small nerf football. Again, there is a natural seam you can follow about half way down. You can follow/separate with your fingers, then finish by cutting straight down with the knife. I set that one aside for myself for a private feast.   Then trim off the silver skin as shown in the video.  Here you was a sharp knife, but not super sharp so it easily cuts though that silver skin.

    Cooking: 
    That sauce sounds really good and I like the idea of using the chain and fatty bottom pieces for the fond.  Brilliant. 

    Personally, I do salt pepper and a light dusting of dizzy pig cow lick. Reverse sear as low as you can for even temperature all the way through. Go by internal temp, but at 225 indirect I would figure 60-70 mins on the egg an a 10 min rest for a rough estimate. Cut portions table side. 

    I do not wrap the tail over to get a uniform thickness for even cooking. My wife likes hers much more done than my rare, so if you are in the same situation, I would not fold over the tail. However, if everyone present  likes the same temp, then I would. 

    Tenderloin, (especially roasts) tastes like the seasoning on it, which is why I like the cooking video that you posted. I might need to give that a try.

    I cook these often and always do the trimming myself. Do not worry about this one.  You got this. 
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------

    Caliking said:   Meat in bung is my favorite. 
  • NDG
    NDG Posts: 2,431
    edited December 2019
    Having never cooked a whole beef tenderloin, why can't you just cook it as-is? I can understand the trimming/butchering if I was catering/retail etc, but why is it needed for the home?
    @SonVolt i think to remove fat & connective tissue.  I was not aware when I purchased, and stil need to research a little more.

    @Photo Egg thanks for reply & link - yours final temp/color is exactly what I am going for - great cook !!

    @GoooDawgs beef wellington !!  I watched a cool gordon ramsay video (he used chestnuts/parma ham) recently on this, but going more classic "meat" this round. Someday soon I will try.

    @Sea2Ski thank you for such a thoughtful response! It is so lean so 100% agree that this cut (fillet mignon) take on the seasoning, so was happy to find this recipe with a sauce to pump up flavors that pairs with this ultra tender beef.  My question . . is "the chain" something you would eat after I sear & use for fond?  Also, considering the recipe I shared, what would you do with "the head" after removed?  Thanks again !!   






    Columbus, OH

    “There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is” 
  • 1911Man
    1911Man Posts: 366
    edited December 2019
    I'm making a beef tenderloin roast for Chanuka dinner (at my sister's place so no BGE cooking). I bought it on Sunday and have it sitting in the fridge now. 
    I always do the trimming myself, even though I could get the meat guys to do it for me. I've done enough of them that it's no issue. I almost do it using muscle memory. ;) 

    I do a simple method for these. Season with fresh ground pepper, light dusting of granulated garlic and a multi seasoning called "Spike" (blue box). Then dust with flour and shove a probe into the middle of the thick end (I leave the 'football' on mine, just tie it together). Pull when it reaches 135F at the probe and let it rest (don't tent, so the carry-over is less). 

    I also make mushrooms and onions to have with this. Sliced onions and mushrooms cooked in EVOO. Season with fresh ground pepper, Spike and granulated garlic (to your taste level). Once cooking well, pour in a couple (or more) shots of good bourbon for greatness. Add roasting pan drippings as well as the runnings from the cutting board to make it even better. That makes it thick enough to be excellent but not a 'gravy'. I might make a roux this holiday to make the onions and mushrooms a little thicker. I can save what I don't use (the roux) for when I make turkey gravy Xmas day.

    BTW, some years back we experimented with different cuts of meat for holiday roasts. The tenderloin came up the winner. It's leaner than a lot of the other cuts, with great flavor and oh so very tender. ;) Plus cooking time is fairly short. I would NEVER abuse such a cut of meat by not using a probe thermometer to tell me when it's ready to be pulled. Going by 'time' will [most likely] give you inferior results. Mostly because if you go by the weight, it will be overdone. Due to the shape of it.
    Now I'm thinking about doing one of the holiday roasts on my BGE. I'll need to figure out the method to do this. Maybe mostly cook it on the BGE, transport to it's final destination to finish in the oven. Or maybe when I move to my next place, I'll get everyone to go there for the holiday. =)
    Large BGE with CGS Woo Ring, stone with stainless pan, Smokeware chimney cap, Kick Ash basket and Kick Ash can.
    Living free in the 603 (Pelham).
  • Sea2Ski
    Sea2Ski Posts: 4,088
    NDG said:     My question . . is "the chain" something you would eat after I sear & use for fond?  Also, considering the recipe I shared, what would you do with "the head" after removed?  Thanks again !!   

    Short answer: yes. 

    Long answer: Yes and you have several options.  I will state that if left whole or in larger pieces it will be well done because you will not have the volume/mass to keep the center of it cool in order to get the mallard reaction and get the browning you want/ need as shown in that video. But you can certainly eat it.  It may also be a bit chewy/fatty if left whole or in large pieces (which is why the chain is also excellent ground for burgers).  

    But in typing this response up, here is an idea if you do not want to go that route.  Bare with me.... 
    You could cut all the chain into small pieces (for size, think half or quarter of a bite). Reserve 75% of it and put it in fridge (more about that later). Use only 25% of it or so for the fond.  Use  the 25% and add it to a hot pan and do not move it. That will brown those pieces and give you what you want for the sauce. Once that is cooked, remove the larger meat pieces, set aside,  and continue with making your sauce and finish cooking the meal. 

    Now, what could you do with the 75% uncooked and 25% cooked chain? Make a fatty but flavorful cheesesteak.  Add the uncooked meat to a hot pan, and when it is 90% cooked  add the left over cooked pieces (from the fond) to warm.  Then add the cheese to the pan, mix, and put on appropriate type of roll.  Yum!! That would be a great “day after” meal. 

    Just a thought....


    The head you can treat as a mini tenderloin roast. It can/should feed two average adults for one meal. Or you can leave it attached.  That is up to you.  There is no wrong choice here. 
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------

    Caliking said:   Meat in bung is my favorite. 
  • NDG
    NDG Posts: 2,431
    @Sea2Ski amazing - love the idea of saving a percent of the chain.  I will post about the recipe after my cook.  
    Columbus, OH

    “There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is” 
  • Sea2Ski
    Sea2Ski Posts: 4,088
    Nicely done!  Glad you enjoyed it and it was a success. 
    --------------------------------------------------
    Burning lump in Downingtown, PA or diesel in Cape May, NJ.
    ....just look for the smoke!
    Large and MiniMax
    --------------------------------------------------

    Caliking said:   Meat in bung is my favorite. 
  • NDG
    NDG Posts: 2,431
    I was going to REPEAT this for 2020 xmas . . it was a hit & repeat meals are low stress.  Sourced again from SRF (actually double R ranch) and just pulled it to thaw, and realize this year it is only 4.4 LBS . . last year it was 7.7 LBS !! 

    I just assumed it was the similar size as description identical, but dang not even close.  I bought 2 of these, as I was going to keep one frozen to eat later . . but now thinking I will need both.  Other thought I try to get away with 1 only, and to have more QTY I can skip all the trim (keep chain / head) and hope for the best.  Think (1) 4.4 LB will be enough for us (6 adults, 2 kids) ?? 

           
    Columbus, OH

    “There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is” 
  • Foghorn
    Foghorn Posts: 9,765
    0.5 pounds of meat per person SHOULD be enough - especially if folks like the sides and desserts, etc and will fill up on them.

    However, only you know the eating habits of your family.  You could cut the second one into 2 pieces and save part of it for another meal sometime when there is a smaller crowd.

    XXL BGE, Karebecue, Klose BYC, Chargiller Akorn Kamado, Weber Smokey Mountain, Grand Turbo gasser, Weber Smoky Joe, and the wheelbarrow that my grandfather used to cook steaks from his cattle

    San Antonio, TX

  • NDG
    NDG Posts: 2,431
    edited December 2020
    @Foghorn thanks for that - I read conflicting things about meat weight per person . . I like the “cut in half” idea as well, thanks !!
    Columbus, OH

    “There are only two ways to live your life.  One is as though nothing is a miracle.  The other is as if everything is”