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Big Green Egg plate

Goofed and let my plate in the rain. Whats the best way to dry it before next cookout?

Comments

  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 5,386
    Leave it out or in a very low oven 
    Visalia, Ca
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 9,478
    lay it out in the sun. No damage done.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • 1voyager1voyager Posts: 654
    edited September 9
    No problem with it getting wet. Mine sits out in rain, snow, hail and there have been no issues. I do tend to add the platesetter at a lower temperature when it's wet or in very cold weather conditions.
    Somewhere in Colorado
    LBGE, PGS A40 Gasser and too much Griswold cast iron cookware.
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,105
    Not quite the same thing, but perhaps even more dramatic, stike cools his egg at tailgates by pouring ice water from his cooler in it. Little Steven used to talk about tossing his screaming hot platesetter onto a Canadian snow bank. Neither ever had a problem. Doesn't seem like a little rain would hurt.

    Mine has been sitting out in the weather all summer now. I rarely use it anyway (and haven't in that time). Hasn't rained in a couple of days so I should probably put it away now while I'm thinking about it, and let it finish drying if it isn't already dry. Not too worried about it though.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • No way! He dumps water on a hot egg? That would cause thermal shock
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 14,337
    When my 2nd XL PS cracked, I went to CGS. That stone has been marvelous, and much more abused than the PS ever had been.

    No issues, only wish I had done so sooner.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 12,256
    No way! He dumps water on a hot egg? That would cause thermal shock
    They test them by dumping cold water on them while blazing hot. Guys egg in the snow and rain all the time. No issue. 
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,951
    edited September 10
    The BGE sits out in the rain all the time too.....plate setter is no different.  All of my stones and plate setters sit out in the rain.  Don't worry about it.
  • I know they do, but it is different getting an egg to temp while outside in snow/rain, and getting it to temp in summer and dumping an ice water bath on it. The two are DRASTICALLY different.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 25,040
    I know they do, but it is different getting an egg to temp while outside in snow/rain, and getting it to temp in summer and dumping an ice water bath on it. The two are DRASTICALLY different.
    bge used to intentionally test eggs for cracking going high temp and dumping cold water in them, they even posted that here years ago
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 12,256
    I know they do, but it is different getting an egg to temp while outside in snow/rain, and getting it to temp in summer and dumping an ice water bath on it. The two are DRASTICALLY different.
    If you are cooking pizza at 800 and a blizzard suddenly occurs, you are going to be just fine. I promise. Prolly happens routinely in the GWN and other locations. 
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,105
    No way! He dumps water on a hot egg? That would cause thermal shock
    TMI on this subject, but here goes. I found one of stike's (using one of his many aliases) posts on the subject. Don't recall seeing it before as he backs off a bit. See bold/italics below. Apparently not the superheated egg I understood it to be. Still, he had just cooked at 400° dome.

    Here's the whole thread (from 2010) https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/comment/974323
    The first post was (I think) a pic of cooler water being poured into an egg. I know there was one anyway. Now gone because (I assume) of photobucket's monkey business a couple of years ago. Or maybe stike just deleted it (back then, you could edit a post forever). Here's the pertinent post in that thread...

    "... i just need you to understand that i do have some experience with cooling the egg in that admittedly unorthodox manner, i do understand what thermal shock is, i do know the egg is formulated to resist it (specially formulated refractory ceramic, tested for repeated cycles of heating/cooling) and i do know it is tested with just the same sort of crazy abuse that my adding water might seem to be. doesn't mean they advertise it or warrant it. but rest assured, i'm pretty certain (from what iunderstood of a conversation) that the egg has been jetted (with blown air) to some crazy temps and then doused with water. especially when testing the firebox formulations ask john at BGE HQ, and he'll likely tell you not to do it, or to even do what i did, but he'll also maybe share with you what it took to destroy an egg that way. that's speculation on my part, you';d have to ask him. maybe there's a magic threshold. i'm pretty sure i'm WAY below it. the dome gets very hot, and i have no knowledge of it ever shattering due to thermal shock

    and at the end of it, i'll remind whoever was contesting it that i have done it a few times before. the usual response will escalate it to "well then, just because it hasn't happened doesn't mean it won't" sure. fair enough.

    but i don't think i ever said i was taking a 500+ degree egg and advocating dumping five gallons of water into it either.

    small egg, had been cruising at 400 for a couple hours. then sitting during the game for 4 hours at cooling temps, then quickly brought to 400 for a brief cook. it was snuffed, and then before putting it in the truck, i ran a thin stream of cold water onto the coals to put them out. a trickle

    did this in full view of the dealer at eggfest in NH, to a large I'd just bought, too. i wasn't going to stand around like mickey the dunce waiting five hours for it to cool

    in light of evidence to the contrary, warnings about doing what i did at the temps i did are well taken, but proven not accurate by my own experience. and extrapolating it to the point where i'm advocating huge doses of water added all at once to a raging egg are way off the mark..."

    So... take all this for what you think it's worth and do what you like. As always, your egg, your choice. =)

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • Thanks for the info, it is nice to know. But even cooking outside and a blizzard comes in, does not transition the temperature in an instant. It is not like it was 90 outside and all of the sudden it is 20 below. 

    I still would not do it intentionally, but the OP was asking about getting the plate wet. I have no issue with that and store mine outside uncovered as well. 


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