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Wanna try Pastrami but need help

The info on this is so amazing on the forums but not sure of how to cure a brisket.  What do you use to keep it in the fridge for the curing time?  Saw someone using a food grade bucket but I was thinking of the tubs.  Anyone have a link on them?  And of course any hints and recipes send my way! 

Maholo!

Tom
Litchfield Park, AZ.  LBGE, MBGE, SBGE, Kokomo Gas Grill, Pacific Living Pizza Oven

Comments

  • BGEChicagoBGEChicago Posts: 562
    Chicago, IL BGE XL BGE Mini Webber Charcoal / Elmhurst, IL
  • KamadoTomKamadoTom Posts: 26
    I've been making pastrami for the last couple weeks and love it!! I'm currently just de brining corned beef that I get from Sam's Club but I would like to make my own corned beef as I've been told it takes the pastrami to a hole different level.
    BGE XL, KJ Classic, Weber Performer Copper, 36" Blackstone Pro Series, Weber Genesis Copper, Traeger Pro 22
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 9,860
    This one looks good, some noob posted it last year.

    https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1205811/holy-grail-pastrami
    Austin, TX
  • NorthPilot06NorthPilot06 Posts: 967
    Yeah, that noob tends to post fake news around these parts frequently =)
    DFW - 1 LGBE & Happy to Adopt More...
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,518
    For an easy way to start making pastrami, buy a corned beef flat.  drop it in a container of water, like a cambro, and leave in the fridge 24 hours to desalt it.  dry it off, and apply a pastrami rub, and let that sit in the fridge for 24 hours.  then add smoke and tenderize.  you can smoke it indirect for a few hours at 275, then wrap in aluminum foil.  easy and fun.

    if that works out and you want to get more control and more involved, you can look into equilibrium brines and cure your own flats and add whatever spices you want. (i still cheat here, and make a brine, and use mccormick pickling spice)
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • Legume said:
    This one looks good, some noob posted it last year.

    https://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1205811/holy-grail-pastrami
    that guy is an idiot
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • tridogdudetridogdude Posts: 133
    I've used this recipe below to do at least 10 pastrami cooks. Ended up tweaking it over time and have had some amazing results. 

    Wet brine I let set for 5 weeks and then a dry rub for 10 days. A lot of it depends on the quality of the meat and the amount of fat in the brisket. 

    Get some extra large bags for turkeys. I double the bags in case one leaks. You can then set these bags inside a new 5 gallon bucket that does not have to be food grade since your brine is not touching the bucket.

    After the wet brine, depending on the size of your brisket, you'll need a large glass or food grade platter/ bowl to let the dry rub rest in. You can use metal but you'll want to use some plastic wrap so the meat is not resting on the metal platter.

    Start out doing your first cook with a smaller cut and work out your recipe.

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/close_to_katzs_home_made_pastrami.html  
  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 13,362
    I did one a while back. Got my direction from the Snake River Farms website. Was excellent. 
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    “May the four winds blow you safely home.”
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,105
    edited August 20
    Here's @thirdeye's method...very good (the only one I've ever tried, actually the only time I ever made pastrami). http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/1996/05/beef-pastrami.html

    Welcome to the nuthouse!

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • ShiffShiff Posts: 1,778
    I've always done a dry brine which I find less messy.  Put the meat in a ziplock bag coated with the Morton Tender Quick and turn it a few times/day.  You can find info on Tender Quick at: https://www.mortonsalt.com/home-product/morton-tender-quick/

    Sometimes it can be hard to find but many grocery stores carry it around here.


    Large BGE
    Barry, Lancaster, PA
  • I've used this recipe below to do at least 10 pastrami cooks. Ended up tweaking it over time and have had some amazing results. 

    Wet brine I let set for 5 weeks and then a dry rub for 10 days. A lot of it depends on the quality of the meat and the amount of fat in the brisket. 

    Get some extra large bags for turkeys. I double the bags in case one leaks. You can then set these bags inside a new 5 gallon bucket that does not have to be food grade since your brine is not touching the bucket.

    After the wet brine, depending on the size of your brisket, you'll need a large glass or food grade platter/ bowl to let the dry rub rest in. You can use metal but you'll want to use some plastic wrap so the meat is not resting on the metal platter.

    Start out doing your first cook with a smaller cut and work out your recipe.

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/close_to_katzs_home_made_pastrami.html  
    wow! I thought mine took forever at a week and a half. 6 weeks in brine/dry rub????? I'm so scattered I'm afraid I would lose interest over 6 weeks.
    Keepin' It Weird in The ATX
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 25,037
    thirdeyes link shows several cooking methods, follow the pressure finish method, it makes a big difference. i bought the 20 dollar pressure cooker from bed bath and beyond just for pastrami. have never made it from scratch, just soaked butcher or grocery store versions for 24 hours and then low and slow.  mostly see this with flats but i prefer the point cut
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 2,498
    I recently bought Michael Symon’s Playing With Fire . In it he gives good and detailed instructions for making pastrami from a whole beef brisket. Starting on page 73 though 74. I wouldn’t mind trying it except I only have a medium and there is no way I could use the mass quantities. Fortunately he has good sections on all other proteins. Good sides, sauces, and rubs.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 25,037
    edited August 20
    I recently bought Michael Symon’s Playing With Fire . In it he gives good and detailed instructions for making pastrami from a whole beef brisket. Starting on page 73 though 74. I wouldn’t mind trying it except I only have a medium and there is no way I could use the mass quantities. Fortunately he has good sections on all other proteins. Good sides, sauces, and rubs.
    try it with a smaller cut, ive had it with chuck and bottom round, both were pretty good, have even had it with beef ribs.  lots of butchers here make corned beef from scratch, some cured with just salt and spice, others using the pink salts
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,518
    I've used this recipe below to do at least 10 pastrami cooks. Ended up tweaking it over time and have had some amazing results. 

    Wet brine I let set for 5 weeks and then a dry rub for 10 days. A lot of it depends on the quality of the meat and the amount of fat in the brisket. 

    Get some extra large bags for turkeys. I double the bags in case one leaks. You can then set these bags inside a new 5 gallon bucket that does not have to be food grade since your brine is not touching the bucket.

    After the wet brine, depending on the size of your brisket, you'll need a large glass or food grade platter/ bowl to let the dry rub rest in. You can use metal but you'll want to use some plastic wrap so the meat is not resting on the metal platter.

    Start out doing your first cook with a smaller cut and work out your recipe.

    http://amazingribs.com/recipes/beef/close_to_katzs_home_made_pastrami.html  
    wow! I thought mine took forever at a week and a half. 6 weeks in brine/dry rub????? I'm so scattered I'm afraid I would lose interest over 6 weeks.
    maybe it's an advanced technique - curing lengthwise, instead of from the sides?
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • DaddyshackDaddyshack Posts: 130
    Been using this since I started (only a year ago). Have made it 6-8 times. Love it. Great reviews too 
  • dannysdannys Posts: 83
    I've done a mess of corned beef over the years and I love the way they come out. Whenever I look at pastrami recipes they always call for Morton Tender Quick. I've got a lifetime supply of pink salt so I don't really want to buy the MTQ. The problem is that I can't find a recipe that uses pink salt or a conversion from MTQ to salt+pink salt.
  • CtTOPGUNCtTOPGUN Posts: 550
     I use "POP'S" mild brine to cure brisket, pork belly, pork loin, pork shoulder. Whatever. It stays in the fridge for between a week and two, depending on thickness of meat. 

     For each gallon of water add 1Tbsp pink curing salt. 1 cup sea salt. 1 cup granulated sugar. 1 cup brown sugar. Let all dissolve completely before adding protein. 
    LBGE/Weber Kettle/Blackstone 36" Griddle/Turkey Fryer/Induction Burner/Gasser/28" Blackstone Griddle

     BBQ from the State of Connecticut!

       Jim
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,494
    dannys said:
    I've done a mess of corned beef over the years and I love the way they come out. Whenever I look at pastrami recipes they always call for Morton Tender Quick. I've got a lifetime supply of pink salt so I don't really want to buy the MTQ. The problem is that I can't find a recipe that uses pink salt or a conversion from MTQ to salt+pink salt.
    Just use the corned beef made from your favorite recipe.  No reason to switch to using MTQ.  The recipe from AmazingRibs.com uses pink salt, not MTQ.  
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 2,498
    dannys said:
    I've done a mess of corned beef over the years and I love the way they come out. Whenever I look at pastrami recipes they always call for Morton Tender Quick. I've got a lifetime supply of pink salt so I don't really want to buy the MTQ. The problem is that I can't find a recipe that uses pink salt or a conversion from MTQ to salt+pink salt.
    Look up the Michael Symon recipe that I mentioned earlier in this thread. It uses the pink salt.
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 2,498
    Type your commentfrom Michael Symon’s Playing With Fire
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 2,498
    On the above brine boil in two quarts of water. Then add ice to cool. Brine 4 days.
  • TwpinazTwpinaz Posts: 3
    Thank you guys for all the tips and recipes!  I'm going to do a quick corned beef one this weekend just to try it out
    Litchfield Park, AZ.  LBGE, MBGE, SBGE, Kokomo Gas Grill, Pacific Living Pizza Oven
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