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Neapolitan pizza

Made Neapolitan pizza on Roccbox. Dough was homemade, pizza took about a minute to cook. 
Bucks County, PA
Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

Comments

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,755
    That looks delicious. Nice job. 
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • Thanks 
    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,348
    I'd eat that :)

    There's a growing roccbox contingent here. Seems like a nifty pizza cooker.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • Thanks. I really like roccbox--very convenient to make pizzas. Mine heats upto 700F in about 30 minutes and it cranks out pizzas every minute.  

    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • CPARKTXCPARKTX Posts: 1,889
    Beautiful. Been debating get a dedicated pizza oven
    LBGE & SBGE.  Central Texas.  
  • thanks. I believe it is worth it. Heats up fast. Did sear some steaks after reverse searing them in an oven. My 2 eggs feel deserted frequently now:)
    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • bluebird66bluebird66 Posts: 2,112
    Very nice!
    Large Egg with adjustable rig, Kick Ash Basket and various Weber's
    Floyd Va

  • Thanks.
    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 298
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.

    00 flour, 59% hydration. I made the dough the day before and left it in the fridge over night.

    I bake the pizza at 800°F. My set up is no daisy wheel. I control the cooking temperature from the bottom vent.

    I fill the fire box full. I light 4 small fires evenly spaced and once they can take high velocity wind without going out I hit them with the BBQ Dragon to get the fire Warp 10 hot very quickly. 

    I raise my pizza stone up close to the height of the built in thermometer in the dome. In view of the fact your stone is almost the same height as your built in thermometer you can trust the accuracy of that thermometer if you’ve calibrated it recently.

    I use an infrared thermometer pointed through the open top vent (no daisy wheel) to see what temperature my pizza stone is, to know when to start baking the pies. It takes about 1 minute to bake your pizza at 800°F.

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s no much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. 
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,080
    I love mine. I need to mix up some biga for the weekend.
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,348
    I love mine. I need to mix up some biga for the weekend.
    Go biga. Or go home. 




    Sorry... had to be said :smiley:

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 30
    HogHeaven said:
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.

    00 flour, 59% hydration. I made the dough the day before and left it in the fridge over night.

    I bake the pizza at 800°F. My set up is no daisy wheel. I control the cooking temperature from the bottom vent.

    I fill the fire box full. I light 4 small fires evenly spaced and once they can take high velocity wind without going out I hit them with the BBQ Dragon to get the fire Warp 10 hot very quickly. 

    I raise my pizza stone up close to the height of the built in thermometer in the dome. In view of the fact your stone is almost the same height as your built in thermometer you can trust the accuracy of that thermometer if you’ve calibrated it recently.

    I use an infrared thermometer pointed through the open top vent (no daisy wheel) to see what temperature my pizza stone is, to know when to start baking the pies. It takes about 1 minute to bake your pizza at 800°F.

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s no much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. 
    Nicely done. You are correct about 00 flour. I make Neopolitan dough in large volumes for a friends pizza joint. Problem is 00 flour costs 3 times what bread flour costs. We manipulated his formulation and got rid of it. He bakes at 775* wood fired and gas assisted. No issues with charring. Our hydration level is almost at 65%. Nice looking pies you crank out! 
  • NewbeeMinimaxNewbeeMinimax Posts: 159
    @HogHeaven. Great set up and good looking pie
    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,166
    HogHeaven said:
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.
    ....

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s too much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. ...
    You sure about this?  00 refers to the milling size of the flour.  There are several different flours milled to 00.  Some suitable for pizza and some not. Just referring to 00 provides incomplete information as to whether a flour is suitable for a recipe.  Also keep in mind that most of the wheat used by Italian flour mills is imported from other countries, including good amounts from Canada and the US.  This is the same wheat used by US mills for American flour.


    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 30
    HogHeaven said:
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.
    ....

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s too much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. ...
    You sure about this?  00 refers to the milling size of the flour.  There are several different flours milled to 00.  Some suitable for pizza and some not. Just referring to 00 provides incomplete information as to whether a flour is suitable for a recipe.  Also keep in mind that most of the wheat used by Italian flour mills is imported from other countries, including good amounts from Canada and the US.  This is the same wheat used by US mills for American flour.


    There isn’t much difference between 00 flour and high protein bread flour (which I have 100,00# silo full of). That’s why we swapped on my buddy’s formula. 1) he couldn’t tell the difference when I made up 2 sample batches and 2) cost
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 30

    12.5 oz portions. Mixed, divided and rounded. Then frozen for 24 hours to stop the yeast. My buddy takes them frozen, slacks out to room temp then hand sheets to 16”. Got dough?
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,320
    the thing ive noticed more with bread flour doughs is they are harder to stretch thin but it can still be done but the light airy texture of the cooked dough is just missing. that sugar burning thing is a myth in my opinion considering ive done bread flour doughs up to 1200 degrees. those pies the light airy texture never fully develops

    NewbeeMinimax  thats a great looking pie

  • NewbeeMinimaxNewbeeMinimax Posts: 159
    Thanks @fishlessman
    Bucks County, PA
    Minimax, XL, Flameboss 200, Roccbox

  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,166
    ColbyLang said:
    HogHeaven said:
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.
    ....

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s too much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. ...
    You sure about this?  00 refers to the milling size of the flour.  There are several different flours milled to 00.  Some suitable for pizza and some not. Just referring to 00 provides incomplete information as to whether a flour is suitable for a recipe.  Also keep in mind that most of the wheat used by Italian flour mills is imported from other countries, including good amounts from Canada and the US.  This is the same wheat used by US mills for American flour.


    There isn’t much difference between 00 flour and high protein bread flour (which I have 100,00# silo full of). That’s why we swapped on my buddy’s formula. 1) he couldn’t tell the difference when I made up 2 sample batches and 2) cost
    I thought that most of the Italian 00 flour sold here in the States has a protein level a little less than normal All Purpose flour.  
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,080
    ColbyLang said:
    HogHeaven said:
    Neapolitan pizza on my large BGE.
    ....

    If you use AP flour or bread flour when cooking at 800° it will be black in one minute or less. There’s too much natural sugar in those flours to bake at that extremely high temperature.

    OO Flour was engineered for baking Neapolitan pizza in brick ovens in Italy a long time ago. ...
    You sure about this?  00 refers to the milling size of the flour.  There are several different flours milled to 00.  Some suitable for pizza and some not. Just referring to 00 provides incomplete information as to whether a flour is suitable for a recipe.  Also keep in mind that most of the wheat used by Italian flour mills is imported from other countries, including good amounts from Canada and the US.  This is the same wheat used by US mills for American flour.


    There isn’t much difference between 00 flour and high protein bread flour (which I have 100,00# silo full of). That’s why we swapped on my buddy’s formula. 1) he couldn’t tell the difference when I made up 2 sample batches and 2) cost
    I thought that most of the Italian 00 flour sold here in the States has a protein level a little less than normal All Purpose flour.  
    Nope. It's usually about the same. Antimo Caputo keeps their "Regular" OO 12.5%. KA AP flour is 12.5%,for reference. OO only refers to the grind of the flour, some OO is like pastry flour and some is like bread flour. Caputo's OO flour ranges from 11% to 13.25% or so, depending on Chef, American Pizza, Pizza, or Pasta and gnocchi. They have 6 or 7 types, if I recall.
  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 298
    edited August 9
    https://stellaculinary.com/cooking-videos/stella-bread/sb-018-how-to-make-neapolitan-pizza


    Neapolitan pizza dough is low hydration and formulated specifically for use in a wood fire oven. To be a true neapolitan pizza, the dough can only contain 00 pizza flour, water, salt and yeast.

    The 00 pizza flour is especially important when making a neapolitan pizza, since the "leapording" or char responsible for the distinct look and flavor of neapolitan pizzas, taste bitter and burnt if any flour besides 00 pizza flour is used.

    In many pizza doughs, especially those formulated for the home kitchen, olive oil and sugar are added to pizza dough; the former making the dough more exstensible, and both alllowing the dough to transfer heat and brown faster. However, if sugar or oil is used in neapolitan dough, it will quikcly burn and become bitter when cooked on a 750ºF+ deck.

    To make the dough more exstensible and easier to stretch, neapolitan pizza dough is fermented for an extended period of time, usually between 24 and 48 hours.


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