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Smoke ring...

I have an old friend that has a traditional smoker and he does an amazing brisket.  He always gets a really thick smoke ring. He starts his fire with solid oak and only uses solid oak. 

I love my BGE brisket. However, it does not get that thick smoke ring. Is this due to not using 100% wood and starting from the lump charcoal?   Has anyone used pure oak to start with and gotten that great smoke ring?

Thanks. 

Comments

  • Hans61Hans61 Posts: 3,452
    I've gotten my best smoke rings with the dome temp between 275-300
    “There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body.”
    Coach Finstock Teen Wolf
  • R2Egg2QR2Egg2Q Posts: 2,018
    I suspect it has something to with the shape of the Egg dome.  I've cooked briskets on both an Egg and my gravity feed cabinet with the exact same lump, smoke chunks, cook temp, and process and the smoke ring is so much more pronounced out of my cabinet smoker.  That said I get better consistency on tenderness cooking them on my Eggs and prefer to use them for brisket.
    XL, Large, Small, Mini Eggs, Humphrey's Weekender, Superior Smokers SS-Two, MAK 1-Star General, Hasty Bake Gourmet, Santa Maria Grill, Thai Charcoal cooker, Webers: 18.5" WSM, 22.5" OTG, 22.5" Kettle Premium, WGA Charcoal, Summit S-620 NG

    Bay Area, CA
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,192
    Cold meat makes a better smoke ring. 
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    How important is a smoke ring?
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    Simi Valley, California
    LBGE, PBC, Annova, SMOBot
  • blastingblasting Posts: 5,655
    bgebrent said:
    How important is a smoke ring?

    We all know it's not important, but I've got to admit, I like to have one.

    Phoenix 
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    blasting said:
    bgebrent said:
    How important is a smoke ring?

    We all know it's not important, but I've got to admit, I like to have one.

    Thank you my friend. I like a good one too, a little. Don't want to see it overemphasized. 
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    True, but the gases are nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO).  The color change is in the myoglobin.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    True, but the gases are nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO).  The color change is in the myoglobin.
    That doesn't explain the chemical reaction fleur de lis boy. 
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    Don't think it matters. @nolaegghead?
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 13,094
    I couldn't care less about a smoke ring. But maybe this will help.

    http://amazingribs.com/tips_and_technique/mythbusting_the_smoke_ring.html

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    bgebrent said:
    Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    True, but the gases are nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO).  The color change is in the myoglobin.
    That doesn't explain the chemical reaction fleur de lis boy. 
    The iron in heme undergoes redox reactions, the oxidation results in a red color.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  •  Celery salt or Accent applied to meat before the rub can make a pretty "smoke" ring.
    LBGE/Weber Kettle/Blackstone 36" Griddle/Turkey Fryer/Induction Burner/Gasser/28" Blackstone Griddle

     BBQ from the State of Connecticut!

       Jim
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    CtTOPGUN said:
     Celery salt or Accent applied to meat before the rub can make a pretty "smoke" ring.
    Accent is MSG, I don't think that would create a smoke ring, but tenderquick or prague powder definitely will.  Celery has naturally high levels of nitrite so it does also.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,444
    Rrainman said:
    I love my BGE brisket. However, it does not get that thick smoke ring. 
    My brother, we all have a different interpretation as to what a "great smoke ring" actually looks like. With that said, this, in my humble opinion, is a pretty decent smoke ring. More often than not, a ring that penetrates any deeper than the ring pictured below was obtained by some sort of trickery such as chemical enhancement and/or voodoo. Again, there are some exceptions to the rule. But not many. 

    Many folks feel that the presence of a ring, or the lack there off is insignificant. As far as quality is concerned, there is certainly an element of truth in that belief. A smoke ring is tasteless and offers nothing in that regard. However, a nice smoke ring is akin to lipstick on a hot blonde. It's visually appealing. This is simply undeniable. 
    If the above is what you are looking for, I can help you out. If it is not what you are looking for, others might can offer a feasible solution to your dilemma. 
    With the above said, the ring pictured above was not obtained by chemical enhancement, nor the use of any fore mentioned voodoo. Just a good, clean fire with proper management my friend. 

    Note on the above:
    If the Lord of the Rings is reading this, may he cast his wisdom and guidance upon us all. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    blasting said:
    bgebrent said:
    How important is a smoke ring?

    We all know it's not important, but I've got to admit, I like to have one.

    (insert foreskin joke here, or not)

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • billt01billt01 Posts: 761
     "Don't listen to her, Bob.Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach."
                                                                                                     -Jane
                                                                                                     "Man and Superman"
    Have:
    LBGE / Stumps Baby XL / Couple of Stokers (Gen 1 and Gen 3), Blackstone 36

    Had:
    Lang 60D, Cookshack SM150, Stumps Stretch, Stumps Baby

    Fat Willies BBQ
    Ola, Ga

  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 17,073
    As above, with the BGE the smoke ring thickness is a random event for me. 
    But the smoke ring thread did cause @SGH to surface. 
    Glad you are still around and occasionally drop by the 'ol 'hood.  
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • SPRIGSSPRIGS Posts: 433
    As has been said - tenderquick if you really want the smokering.  I have never used celery salt but assume it works just as well.  I used to get all concerned over the lack of the smokering from the Egg.  Doesn't impact the taste at all but for some, they want or need to see the ring to verifiy that is has been smoked low and slow.
    XL BGE
  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,444
    lousubcap said:
    But the smoke ring thread did cause @SGH to surface. 
    Glad you are still around and occasionally drop by the 'ol 'hood.  
    Thanks brother Cap. I'm still not back full time, but I do have a little more time to pop in from time to time. It will be nice to finally be back in full force. I miss cutting up with all of y'all. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,690

    I've gotten some pretty good smoke rings on my briskets.  I rub with Mickey's coffee rub, usually Oak for the smoking wood (5-6 pieces).  I put the meat on when the temp is about 200 with a fresh piece of wood on top of the lump, then I let the temp slowly rise to about 275.   I am not a real patient guy so I usually foil at the stall.

    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    bgebrent said:
    Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    True, but the gases are nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO).  The color change is in the myoglobin.
    That doesn't explain the chemical reaction fleur de lis boy. 
    The iron in heme undergoes redox reactions, the oxidation results in a red color.
    I understand the oxidation reaction.  Thank you for elucidating.  What is heme?
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    bgebrent said:
    bgebrent said:
    Nitrogen dioxide from wood smoke plus natural moisture of the meat mixes together and causes the smoke ring.  It can be enhanced by starting with colder meat.
    True, but the gases are nitric oxide (NO) and carbon monoxide (CO).  The color change is in the myoglobin.
    That doesn't explain the chemical reaction fleur de lis boy. 
    The iron in heme undergoes redox reactions, the oxidation results in a red color.
    I understand the oxidation reaction.  Thank you for elucidating.  What is heme?

    There are several biologically important kinds of heme:


    Heme A Heme B Heme C Heme O
    PubChem number 7888115 444098 444125 6323367
    Chemical formula C49H56O6N4Fe C34H32O4N4Fe C34H36O4N4S2Fe C49H58O5N4Fe
    Functional group at C3 Porphyrine General Formula V1svg –CH(OH)CH2Far –CH=CH2 –CH(cystein-S-yl)CH3 –CH(OH)CH2Far
    Functional group at C8 –CH=CH2 –CH=CH2 –CH(cystein-S-yl)CH3 –CH=CH2
    Functional group at C18 –CH=O –CH3 –CH3 –CH3
    Structure of Heme B
    Heme A[9] Heme A is synthesized from heme B. In two sequential reactions a 17-hydroxyethylfarnesyl moiety (blue) is added at the 2-position and an aldehyde (purple) is added at the 8-position. Nomenclature is shown in green.[10]
    The most common type is heme B; other important types include heme A and heme C.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    Is your hemoglobin A, B, C, or O?  Heme, in medical terms is something very different.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,259
    bgebrent said:
    Is your hemoglobin A, B, C, or O?  Heme, in medical terms is something very different.
    Beats me, man.  What do I look like, a biochemist?!

    Check this out:  (the chemistry in horseshoe crab blood)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemocyanin

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 16,627
    bgebrent said:
    Is your hemoglobin A, B, C, or O?  Heme, in medical terms is something very different.
    Beats me, man.  What do I look like, a biochemist?!

    Check this out:  (the chemistry in horseshoe crab blood)

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hemocyanin

    Wikipedia, lame.  You are indeed a chemist.  Heme means something different to those of us who are both chemists and surgeons.  See you soon hippy.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,192
    @nolaegghead just change to conversation to electricity if you want to stump ol' Brent. 
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