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People not from the USA - what American food do you want to try?

______________________________________________
This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

Comments

  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,148
    Loved it!!!
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 12,423
    Your lazagna.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • BotchBotch Posts: 6,462
    Fascinating read.  I've visited about 10 different countries and have always enjoyed the "local" cuisines (except for a couple british items).  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    Botch said:
    ........... have always enjoyed the "local" cuisines (except for a couple british items).  
    Name and shame please, we won't (probably) get offended.
  • BotchBotch Posts: 6,462
    edited September 2017
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,275
    I've always wondered what spotted **** tastes like (I know that doesn't sound right). Pics have looked somewhat appealing. How the heck did it get that name though?

    @botch black pudding (blood sausage) is awesome. I've had it an an Argetninian place too.  

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    Botch said:
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. Never had boiled bacon for breakfast, that's a bit strange and not correct for a full English. 

    Not sure what to say about black pudding (blood sausage), it is fantastic and a must for a cooked breakfast. In Northern Ireland the full breakfast is an Ulster Fry and includes black pudding and white pudding - made from tripe, which is also fantastic.

    Finally, mushy peas are a must with fish and chips.

    It would be good to try BBQ US style to compare with my efforts, for which I have no real reference point. Ribs, brisket etc. would be really interesting to try. I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,127
    Eoin said:
    Botch said:
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. Never had boiled bacon for breakfast, that's a bit strange and not correct for a full English. 

    Not sure what to say about black pudding (blood sausage), it is fantastic and a must for a cooked breakfast. In Northern Ireland the full breakfast is an Ulster Fry and includes black pudding and white pudding - made from tripe, which is also fantastic.

    Finally, mushy peas are a must with fish and chips.

    It would be good to try BBQ US style to compare with my efforts, for which I have no real reference point. Ribs, brisket etc. would be really interesting to try. I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
    salmon and peas is a new england tradition, never served here with fried fish though. fried fish gets tarter sauce
  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    Eoin said:
    Botch said:
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. Never had boiled bacon for breakfast, that's a bit strange and not correct for a full English. 

    Not sure what to say about black pudding (blood sausage), it is fantastic and a must for a cooked breakfast. In Northern Ireland the full breakfast is an Ulster Fry and includes black pudding and white pudding - made from tripe, which is also fantastic.

    Finally, mushy peas are a must with fish and chips.

    It would be good to try BBQ US style to compare with my efforts, for which I have no real reference point. Ribs, brisket etc. would be really interesting to try. I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
    salmon and peas is a new england tradition, never served here with fried fish though. fried fish gets tarter sauce
    Mushy peas?

    In the North where we are, pie and peas with mint sauce is a favourite. Got plenty of mint in the garden for this purpose, my preferred pie is steak and kidney
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,204
    The Brits are like the Borg.  They have incorporated plenty of colonial cuisine into their lexicon of daily meals.  Except for American BBQ...  

    Curry is a British definition of an Indian spice mix.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    The Brits are like the Borg.  They have incorporated plenty of colonial cuisine into their lexicon of daily meals.  Except for American BBQ...  

    Curry is a British definition of an Indian spice mix.
    Yes, curry in the curry house is definitely a British interpretation. I do have some proper Indian cook books as well and do this at home. BBQ here is usually terrible, last time I saw 'brisket' is was pulled and sitting in a warming tray, curling at the edges. I didn't try it. The same place had pulled pork, didn't try that either, mine looks way better and I'm an amateur.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,127
    Eoin said:
    Eoin said:
    Botch said:
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. Never had boiled bacon for breakfast, that's a bit strange and not correct for a full English. 

    Not sure what to say about black pudding (blood sausage), it is fantastic and a must for a cooked breakfast. In Northern Ireland the full breakfast is an Ulster Fry and includes black pudding and white pudding - made from tripe, which is also fantastic.

    Finally, mushy peas are a must with fish and chips.

    It would be good to try BBQ US style to compare with my efforts, for which I have no real reference point. Ribs, brisket etc. would be really interesting to try. I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
    salmon and peas is a new england tradition, never served here with fried fish though. fried fish gets tarter sauce
    Mushy peas?

    In the North where we are, pie and peas with mint sauce is a favourite. Got plenty of mint in the garden for this purpose, my preferred pie is steak and kidney
    peas get lightly steamed, never mushy =) we have an english pie shop nearby, lots of meat pies you may have never seen to appease the locals but they have great pork pie and beef/kidney.  pies are out of the ovens starting 9am, always a breakfast crowd.

    http://www.thwaitesmarket.com/index.php

  • @Eoin - not sure where you are in UK but I know this guy has spent some time in the US (Texas) and knows how to do it right!!
    https://www.greatfoodclub.co.uk/business/low-n-slow-street-food/

    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    @Eoin - not sure where you are in UK but I know this guy has spent some time in the US (Texas) and knows how to do it right!!
    https://www.greatfoodclub.co.uk/business/low-n-slow-street-food/
    He's in Birmingham and I'm there tomorrow to see a customer. I've emilailed him to see where he's going to be.
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,275
    edited September 2017
    Eoin said:
    Botch said:
    Oh noes, that was quick!   :o  :blush:
     
    I normally had your light "continental" breakfasts (where I began a lifelong love of tea) but one weekend I ordered a "heavier" breakfast.  The bacon was boiled, not fried.  That was sick and wrong.  
    The other thing is all the "smashed-pea" inclusions, and this is more me, I don't like peas unless the water is boiling first, pick them in the garden, shell them as you race back to the house, blanch quickly; then peas are okay.  Otherwise, canned, mashed, smeared, even frozen, I just don't care for them.  
    I haven't tried blood sausage, I could like it; just the idea gives me a mental block (and yet I'ved had Rocky Mountain Oysters).  
     
    I'm interested in what American foods you'd like to try, Eoin.  Were I to cook for you it'd be pork spareribs and beef plate ribs; the ribs you've shown look so different from what we have.  

    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. Never had boiled bacon for breakfast, that's a bit strange and not correct for a full English. 

    Not sure what to say about black pudding (blood sausage), it is fantastic and a must for a cooked breakfast. In Northern Ireland the full breakfast is an Ulster Fry and includes black pudding and white pudding - made from tripe, which is also fantastic.

    Finally, mushy peas are a must with fish and chips.

    It would be good to try BBQ US style to compare with my efforts, for which I have no real reference point. Ribs, brisket etc. would be really interesting to try. I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
    You're welcome to come visit us in Houston anytime . We'll get some good 'cue in ya :)

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • CTMikeCTMike Posts: 1,715
    The daughter of a friend and coworker got married this weekend to an Irish gent.  When his visiting family was asked if there was anything they wanted to see, the answer was "Walmart." Seems they loaded up on Lucky Charms and the like and they will be hosting an "American Breakfast" party when they get back home. 
    MMBGE / Large BGE / XL BGE (Craigslist Find) / SF30x80 cabinet trailer - "Ol' Mortimer" / Outdoor kitchen in progress.  

    Southeastern CT. 
  • CTMikeCTMike Posts: 1,715
    My first time in the U.K. Was Scotland back in 1982. Went to the local shop for some fish and chips. It came wrapped in newspaper, and the lady behind the counter asked if you wanted salt and vinegar on it as she was already pouring it on. If you said no she just stopped sooner. 

    My first Full English Breakfast was a disaster. Egg was cooked in a ring, black on the bottom, runny on top. Fried tomato was ok, the included sausage and bacon was pretty good as I recall. 
    MMBGE / Large BGE / XL BGE (Craigslist Find) / SF30x80 cabinet trailer - "Ol' Mortimer" / Outdoor kitchen in progress.  

    Southeastern CT. 
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 12,170
    Eoin said:
    The Brits are like the Borg.  They have incorporated plenty of colonial cuisine into their lexicon of daily meals.  Except for American BBQ...  

    Curry is a British definition of an Indian spice mix.
    Yes, curry in the curry house is definitely a British interpretation. I do have some proper Indian cook books as well and do this at home. BBQ here is usually terrible, last time I saw 'brisket' is was pulled and sitting in a warming tray, curling at the edges. I didn't try it. The same place had pulled pork, didn't try that either, mine looks way better and I'm an amateur.
    Don't feel bad; most of the BBQ here is terrible as well. 
  • johnnypjohnnyp Posts: 2,997
    Eoin said:

    I see a lot of good stuff on here from a lot of great cooks, there's so much to try.
    True that. 

    let me get crazy here for a moment.  Butt blast next year?  (I won't be at brisket camp).  
    XL & MM BGE, 36" Blackstone - Newport News, VA
  • stv8rstv8r Posts: 656
    Felt the love for Thrasher's Fries in OC MD....Yes they are that good!
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,590
    CTMike said:
    The daughter of a friend and coworker got married this weekend to an Irish gent.  When his visiting family was asked if there was anything they wanted to see, the answer was "Walmart." Seems they loaded up on Lucky Charms and the like and they will be hosting an "American Breakfast" party when they get back home. 
    They know to pour Budweiser over them, right?

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,204
    Foghorn said:
    CTMike said:
    The daughter of a friend and coworker got married this weekend to an Irish gent.  When his visiting family was asked if there was anything they wanted to see, the answer was "Walmart." Seems they loaded up on Lucky Charms and the like and they will be hosting an "American Breakfast" party when they get back home. 
    They know to pour Budweiser over them, right?
    They'll probably ruin it with Budweiser Budvar Brewery beer.

    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • That subreddit makes me want thanksgiving early
    +++++++++++++++++++++++++++
    Austin, Texas.  I'm the guy holding a beer.
  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,647
    @GATraveller the low-n-slow guy only does Friday in Birmingham plus events, so no luck today.

    @johnnyp butt blast one day when we get a chance to have a long enough holiday to be able to come over to the US.
  • Eoin said:
    @GATraveller the low-n-slow guy only does Friday in Birmingham plus events, so no luck today.

    @johnnyp butt blast one day when we get a chance to have a long enough holiday to be able to come over to the US.
    Bummer

    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • BotchBotch Posts: 6,462
    Eoin said:  
    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. 
    Well, I'm either not remembering correctly or was told wrong.  I thought a continental breakfast was simply a lightly-sweetened (not the saccharine sugarbombs we yanks are stuck with) pastry, and tea; nothing else (they never included even cheese nor ham).  That was nice most mornings.    
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,127
    Botch said:
    Eoin said:  
    Continental breakfast is called that because it's what they eat on the continent - bread, cheese, ham and pastries aren't British. 
    Well, I'm either not remembering correctly or was told wrong.  I thought a continental breakfast was simply a lightly-sweetened (not the saccharine sugarbombs we yanks are stuck with) pastry, and tea; nothing else (they never included even cheese nor ham).  That was nice most mornings.    
    sounds more similar to a complimentry "continental" hotel breakfast that some hotels used to make but with coffee and/or tea, usually set up in the lobby or just off of it
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 27,204
    from http://www.thekitchn.com/what-is-a-continental-breakfast-and-what-makes-it-continental-239400

    Where does the term come from?

    The term "continental breakfast" originated in Britain in the mid-19th century. To the British, "the continent" refers to the countries of mainland Europe. A "continental breakfast" describes the type of breakfast you'd encounter in places like France and the Mediterranean. It's a lighter, more delicate alternative to the full English breakfast — a heaping plate of eggs, bacon, sausage, toast, beans, and roasted mushrooms and tomatoes.

    Continental breakfasts were also a stark contrast to American-style breakfasts, which boasted large helpings of eggs, breakfast meats, pancakes, potatoes, and toast. Europeans recoiled at the American-style breakfast, which they found too heavy and far too greasy. They preferred much more modest breakfast fare like fruit, bread, and pastries. So hotels aimed to please their more refined palates.



    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

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