Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Best Cookbook

Any recommendations for good cook books? 

Comments

  • ThatgrimguyThatgrimguy Posts: 3,830
    edited December 2015
    That's WAY to broad.  So many options it's like information overload.
    What do YOU want to learn?  BBQ? I would grab Aaron Franklin's Manifesto and/or Smoking Meat by Jeff Phillips or Weber Smoke is also a good choice.  All around cook book, the Junior League Centennial cookbook is great.  For baking the New Artisan Bread in 5 min a day is a great starting point. If you want to really get off on smoked meat then grab Charcuterie by Michael Ruhlman.  

    Like I said lots of options.
    Biloxi, MS
    Guild's Grocery BBQ Team
    The Grocery Cart
    XL / Small Green Eggs
  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 7,673
    Or save your money and just look for recipes here and online.

    Rowlett, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

  • ...and remember: the BGE is basically used liked an oven or a grill.  so any recipe you are interested in that is oven or grill based will pretty much work on the BGE
    [social media disclaimer: irony and sarcasm may be used in some or all of user's posts; emoticon usage is intended to indicate moderately jocular social interaction; the comments toward users, their usernames, and the real people (living or dead) that they refer to are not intended to be adversarial in nature; those replying to this user are entering into a tacit agreement that they are real-life or social-media acquaintances and/or have agreed to or tacitly agreed to perpetrate occasional good-natured ribbing between and among themselves and others]

  • The Silver Spoon. It's essentially the bible of Italian cooking, has been in print in Italy since the 1950's and has just recently been converted into English, U.S.  measurments, order of operations and temperatures. Many of the recipes have limited ingredients and there are over 1000 of them. It's beautifully bound, has great photos and it's available at Costco. I think it's around $35.00. It can be daunting but just dive in and pick something. Also, for just pure brilliance, The French Laundry Cookbook and Ad Hoc by Thomas Keller. Oh, I would also suggest any one of Ina Garten's cook books. 
  • westernbbqwesternbbq Posts: 2,139
    Mustard's cookbook has many great items in it.  Also consider a subscription to America's test kitchen.  Ive gotten so many great ideas and techniques from ATK that i apply to BGE cooking that it has been incredible.
  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,064
    SurreyEgg said:
    Any recommendations for good cook books? 
    As some above have already said, it depends on what you are interested in cooking or making. With that in mind, here is one that I really like. It's 2000+ pages of no nonsense, old school info. A lot of great across the board info in it. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,661
    We're giving out 4 of these for the holiday


    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • Davec433Davec433 Posts: 463
    edited December 2015
    I own the BGE cookbook but honestly don't use it. My wife is trying to lose 20 pounds so what we cook is pretty much the same every week steak, chicken breasts, fish, and chicken wings rubbed. When she was on a diet I'd simply us a Google.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,661
    The BGE cookbook, which we have, is terrible.
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • smbishopsmbishop Posts: 1,966
    edited December 2015
    Adam Perry Lang's Serious Barbecue is my go to cookbook.  All of the recipes are pretty involved, making the rubs, sauces, marinades, etc. from scratch.  I have learned a lot from his recipes and have loved all of the results.  If you want something less involved, he has a smaller, simpler version called "BBQ 25".  Love them both!
    Southlake, TX.  And any chance I get,  @ Cowhouse Creek - Gatesville, TX
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,207

    Weber's Way to Grill is a good basic grilling book.  Good recipes, but written for gasser/charcoal grills.  You'll have to adapt to the egg.


    As an alternative to the BGE cookbook, try "Smoke it Like a Pro on the Big Green Egg."  It's a good cookbook that covers a lot of basics.

    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • The New Professional Chef from the CIA (Culinary Institute of America)

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,207
    smbishop said:
    Adam Perry Lang's Serious Barbecue is my go to cookbook.  All of the recipes are pretty involved, making the rubs, sauces, marinades, etc. from scratch.  I have learned a lot from his recipes and have loved all of the results.  If you want something less involved, he has a smaller, simpler version called "BBQ 25".  Love them both!

    @smbishop ;  I read that book, after seeing some of  @nphuskerFL ; 's posts.  I imagine you guys thinking about what to make for dinner: "Should I make a brine? a rub? a mop? a marinade? AND a board sauce?  YES, ALL AT ONCE!"
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • Mosca said:
    I bought this in ebook for like $2. It has some good stuff in it. 
    Jason NW GA- home of carpet and Mexican restaurants
    LBGE, MM, BS (Blackstone and the other kind)
    One sorry Labrador

    My chili did not suck. 
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,937
    SurreyEgg said:
    Any recommendations for good cook books? 
    You've just jumped into the deep end of a huge ocean.

    For many years, the 1975 edition of the "Joy of Cooking" was my go to.

    Now, I have saved about 3000 recipes found on line. And many facsimiles of old historic cook books, such as Apicius & Escoffier.  All worth while.

    I have several by Jacques Pepin, and have considered getting "Essential Pepin," which has 700 recipes. All of his work is absolutely solid classic French. I'm only hesitant because I have no more shelf space.

    If you want to understand cooking, get Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking." It not like a recipe book, take these ingredients, put them together this way. It here is why various foods are cooked the way they are. What makes them flavorful and palatable.  Knowing such things allows one to evaluate recipes, and figure out what is going on as the dish is made.
  • MoscaMosca Posts: 451
    gdenby said:
    SurreyEgg said:
    Any recommendations for good cook books? 
    You've just jumped into the deep end of a huge ocean.

    For many years, the 1975 edition of the "Joy of Cooking" was my go to.

    Now, I have saved about 3000 recipes found on line. And many facsimiles of old historic cook books, such as Apicius & Escoffier.  All worth while.

    I have several by Jacques Pepin, and have considered getting "Essential Pepin," which has 700 recipes. All of his work is absolutely solid classic French. I'm only hesitant because I have no more shelf space.

    If you want to understand cooking, get Harold McGee's "On Food and Cooking." It not like a recipe book, take these ingredients, put them together this way. It here is why various foods are cooked the way they are. What makes them flavorful and palatable.  Knowing such things allows one to evaluate recipes, and figure out what is going on as the dish is made.
    I was just going through my cookbooks, thinking about how I never use them any more. the only older ones I've kept are the 1994 Joy of Cooking, The Meat and Potatoes Cookbook, How To Succeed With Chicken Without Really Frying, and Recipes for a Small Planet, from when I was a hippie in the '70s.

    I recently got The Southern Living Cookbook, not that good; Weber's The New Grilling Cookbook, which is okay; and my sister sent me Kenji's The Food Lab, which I love.


  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,937
    SGH said:
    SurreyEgg said:
    Any recommendations for good cook books? 
    As some above have already said, it depends on what you are interested in cooking or making. With that in mind, here is one that I really like. It's 2000+ pages of no nonsense, old school info. A lot of great across the board info in it. 

    I've got a couple of their recipes. I recall that some time ago they translated an official Polish gov't manual defining what and how different sausages were made.

    If you are ever in Chi, visit one of Gene's sausage and deli shops. A few years ago his sausage makers, all first named Stanley, had about 120 years of experience between them. The kiska is perfect.
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 11,917
    The Atlanta crowd can attest to this. 


  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 2,540
    smbishop said:
    Adam Perry Lang's Serious Barbecue is my go to cookbook.  All of the recipes are pretty involved, making the rubs, sauces, marinades, etc. from scratch.  I have learned a lot from his recipes and have loved all of the results.  If you want something less involved, he has a smaller, simpler version called "BBQ 25".  Love them both!
    "Charred and Scruffed" is very good, too.
    NOLA
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.