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RICHIED777
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Ragtop99

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  • Semi Frozen Lamb Chops - Reverse Sear to the Rescue

    I took some lamb chops out to defrost, but they didn't fully defrost by the time I was ready to cook.  Parts of them were soft to the touch, but other parts were hard.  I set up my medium for raised direct and let it heat up to 250* and place the chops so they were standing up on the T-bone.  I put them toward the outside of the egg so they were not direct over the fire, which was mainly centered on a big chuck of mesquite that was left from roasting peppers.  I started checking them after 20 minutes with the thermapen and pulled off any that reached 115*.  I just let them sit, no foil or anything so the early ones cooled a bit.  After the last chop was off, I opened it for a reverse sear at 600*.  

    This work really well.  I'm glad I did this rather than hot tubbing them.  They came out with a deep red, almost burgundy color, prior to sear.Medium Rare center after the sear.  The photo color is off a bit, but gives an idea.  

    image
  • Re: Cold weather use of an Big Green Egg

    29* and windy as we speak.  Ribs will be coming off in 10 minutes.  No temp control issues with the egg.  in fact cold weather BBQ is the best feature of the egg.  Is it easy to do good BBQ on a calm  summer day on my Weber, but winter options were limited to high heat grilling.
  • Drip Pans

    I had bought some pizza pans from Amazon to use to collect dippings and found that they were so flat that the mess from pork butts wasn't always contained.  I found this 1" deep pan for the XL:
    https://www.etundra.com/kitchen-supplies/baking-supplies/baking-pans/pizza/pans/american-metalcraft-adep18-18-in-by-1-in-deep-pizza-pan/

    It works well with my Woo from CGS.  Its deep enough that it can collect a lot of grease with out overflowing and shallow enough that I can raise it a bit off my stone and still have good air circulation under the meat.  

    I picked up a 10" and 11" to use with my medium.  The 10" fits within the platesetter and the 11" provides a little more coverage for bigger items w/o blocking too much airflow.

    They have additional sizes so small and large eggheads should be able to find one that fits.  Some sizes are available in 1/2" depth, which would be adequate for most uses.
  • Re: I am going to do pork ribs, what style is your favorite?

    I keep them simple. Mostly I make spares, but babybacks sometimes as a change.

    I cut off any huge chunks of fat, remove the skin from the back side, and apply a rub on them while the grill is heating up.  The rub is a mix of peppers, garlic, oregano, and couple other things.  I don't use sugar in the rub as the BBQ sauce is plenty sweet for me.  I make a big batch a few times a year and put it in a spice jar. 

    I put them on the grill, close the lid, and don't touch them for 3 hours.  I flip them and let them cook 1 - 2 hours more depending upon whether the temp was close to 250* or it heated up to 275*.  If I don't flip, its not a big deal.  At the 4 - 5 hour mark, I use the bend test and see if they are almost done.  If yes, I apply a coat of sauce and open the vents and allow the temp to rise to around 325*.  After 10 minutes or so I flip them and apply sauce to the back side.  In  another 10 minutes flip and apply a second coat to the top.  After 10 - 20 minutes I pull and serve them.  If I'm making multiple slabs, I don't sauce one slab.

    I like them tender, but not fall off the bone.  Fall off the bone can be achieved by cooking for an hour longer, or for the same time at 25*  - 35* higher temp. 

    I don't use foil because that is cooking by steaming. 

    I'd suggest starting simple and seeing the results.  Then experiment by moving to more complex recipes like posted by@JMCXL. 


  • Re: My XL Table Build - Final Reveal

    Very nice. If you get tired of it, I can find room on my patio for it.  ;)

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