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Goose recipe

LeiboLeibo Posts: 9
edited November -1 in EggHead Forum
I am looking for some help from my fellow eggers. A buddy wants to smoke a goose on the LBGE. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am new to the forum, so I apologize if this has already been asked and answered.

Peace and love.

Comments

  • HossHoss Posts: 14,600
    I've only had one smoked goose that was edible and I have no idea how the man fixed but it was good.All the others I have tasted have bordered on unedible/repulsive.I wish you luck and if you find a good recipe PLEASE post it! :)
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,297
    This might help.

    Goose, Christmas, Irishhog

    I cooked one a few years ago on a turkey cone, which I set in a stainless steel bowl to catch the fats. If you have never cooked goose be ready for a large amount of fat which if not collected will drip onto the coals and cause problems as it burns off. Prod the skin of the goose with a fork, but be careful not to go through to the meat. As the fat renders it will run out of the skin and into your collection bowl. Use this fat later for roasting potatoes, in Ireland it is traditional (but not very healthy) to roast potatoes in goose fat, because it takes high heat, and imparts great flavour. Boil the peeled potatoes for 3 or 4 minutes and then toss into very hot goose fat in a roasting tin, and roast in an oven or the egg for up to 1 hour depending on size.To go back to the goose, it goes very well with homemade apple sauce, and potato stuffing. Chunks of apple pushed into the cavity before cooking also impart great flavour.I cooked a goose for the open catagory of a competition a few years ago and scored second place in the competition. Goose is a lovely meal, but it is important to release as much fat as possible as you cook the meat, and believe me if this is your first goose, you will be amased by the amount of fat which is released.P.S. goose grease is also a good cure for stiff joints and back ache. Just rub it into the the sore area and you will get great relief, another Irish remedy to a common problem.


    INGREDIENTS:



    Recipe Type
    Main Dish, Poultry

    Recipe Source
    Source: BGE Forum, Irishhog, 2007/12/19
  • EVERYTHING that Richard just said!!

    I think Goose may be an acquired taste and perhaps some people will never like it, no matter!
    The two most very important things are to render the fat and to keep said fat from burning!
    Set the Egg for indirect with a drip pan and get the goose vertical, as this really helps render out the fat.
    The drip pan needs to be spaced also, because all cost must be taken to NOT burn the fat! In my mind that imparts a terrible flavor as does a fatty bird itself. Even with a roasted duck that isn’t rendered well...All I taste is the fat and that’s way “livery” for lack of a better term.
    I do a temp of around 300 F. and I like apple or cherry smoke-wood (I have those) but I would think that most any fruit wood, even grape vine (I have done a chicken with grape), would work well.
    At 300 F. figure about 15 to 20 minutes / lb. and pull at a temp of about 160 - 165 F. then rest in a foil tented for at least 10 minutes.
    BTW, if it’s a wild goose….I have NEVER been able to get one fall apart tender with out braising a cut up bird! BUT…Smoked is really good :) . It’s just a bit tougher to chew ;) .
  • SeaborgSeaborg Posts: 1

    To prevent the "livery" flavor when cooking your goose, never cook it past medium rare. Waterfowl don't carry salmonella so "undercooking" isn't dangerous. This goes for duck, swan and goose. You may want to inject a good wine or ale marinade. Remember that using ale, wine, or brandy marinades "TINCTURES" the ingredients in the marinade and helps them propagate throughout the bird. Waterfowl need to marinade longer than other meats. 12 hours or more makes the marinade propagate more evenly throughout the bird.

    Your goose is cooked!


    Good egging!


    Mike

  • bboulierbboulier Posts: 558
    If our community would relax rules regarding hunting with bow and arrows or trapping, I would eat goose more  often.  And, I would hope my neighbors would do so also.  Way too many geese.  Good luck. 
    Weber Kettle, Weber Genesis Silver B, Medium Egg, KJ Classic (Black)
  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 18,558
    Leibo said:
    I am looking for some help from my fellow eggers. A buddy wants to smoke a goose on the LBGE. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am new to the forum, so I apologize if this has already been asked and answered.

    Peace and love.
    Did you ever find a recipe that you liked?
    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    The other ahole

    Living large in the 919
  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,649
    "Waterfowl don't carry salmonella so 'undercooking' isn't dangerous. This goes for duck, swan and goose."

    I'm not sure where this idea came from, but it's false.  A quick search produces many hits.  Here's just one: 

    The CDC (https://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/live-poultry-06-17/index.html) said, "This year saw the largest number of illnesses linked to contact with backyard poultry ever recorded by CDC. Contact with live poultry or their environment can make people sick with Salmonella infections. Live poultry such as chickens and ducks can be carrying Salmonella bacteria but appear healthy and clean, with no sign of illness."  If anything, "industrial" poultry may be even ore likely to be contaminated than "backyard" poultry.

    That particular article didn't mention geese, but others do.

    None of this means the risk is necessarily very high.  Restaurants routinely serve duck breasts more rare than medium rare, and very few people seem to get sick.  I've eaten duck that way and I never had a problem.  But if there are elderly people or young children who may eat the dish, or anyone else with a less than strong immune system, they are at much higher risk of becoming desperately, miserably sick or even dying if this one did have salmonella, as some definitely do.
  • EoinEoin Posts: 3,424
    Leibo said:
    I am looking for some help from my fellow eggers. A buddy wants to smoke a goose on the LBGE. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am new to the forum, so I apologize if this has already been asked and answered.

    Peace and love.
    Did you ever find a recipe that you liked?
    Are you looking to do a goose?
  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 18,558
    Eoin said:
    Leibo said:
    I am looking for some help from my fellow eggers. A buddy wants to smoke a goose on the LBGE. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am new to the forum, so I apologize if this has already been asked and answered.

    Peace and love.
    Did you ever find a recipe that you liked?
    Are you looking to do a goose?
    Well Christmas is coming, so I'm assuming there are a few around that are getting fat.
    "A generation of the unteachable is hanging upon us like a necklace of corpses." - George Orwell 

    "I've made a note never to piss you two off." - Stike

    The other ahole

    Living large in the 919
  • EoinEoin Posts: 3,424
    Eoin said:
    Leibo said:
    I am looking for some help from my fellow eggers. A buddy wants to smoke a goose on the LBGE. Does anyone have any suggestions? I am new to the forum, so I apologize if this has already been asked and answered.

    Peace and love.
    Did you ever find a recipe that you liked?
    Are you looking to do a goose?
    Well Christmas is coming, so I'm assuming there are a few around that are getting fat.
    Definitely too fat for the Egg.
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