Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg to Experience our World of Flavor™ at:
Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #BigGreenEgg.

Want to see how the EGG is made? Click to Watch

Flake salt - a new thing to me

RRP
RRP Posts: 25,885
Seems like I'm always learning something new! But I have to ask - how many of you already know this or use it since I don't recall any recipes here mentioning it. 

Per Cargill Proprietary Research
Compared to granulated salt, flake salts will stick better to food, dissolve faster, and blend more evenly. It is also highly sought after by chefs and culinary experts in kitchens around the world due to its “pinchable” texture, meaning it’s easier to crush between your fingertips and deliver better seasoning control.  Because of these differentiated characteristics, flake salt is especially favorable for a wide variety of food processing and foodservice applications. For instance, flake salt is ideal for koshering meat, since its larger surface area makes it better for absorption. It also works exceptionally well in fried and topical applications due to its stronger adherence and visual appeal.


Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.

Comments

  • DoubleEgger
    DoubleEgger Posts: 17,158
    “Proprietary Research” was the red flag for me and as I suspected, Cargill is peddling flake salt. 

    https://www.cargill.com/food-beverage/na/alberger-flake-salts#:~:text=Alberger®%20brand%20flake%20salts%2C%20exclusively%20from%20Cargill%2C%20are%20tiny,with%20a%20hollow%20pyramid%20shape.
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,730
    edited January 9
    RRP said:
    Seems like I'm always learning something new! But I have to ask - how many of you already know this or use it since I don't recall any recipes here mentioning it. 

    Per Cargill Proprietary Research
    Compared to granulated salt, flake salts will stick better to food, dissolve faster, and blend more evenly. It is also highly sought after by chefs and culinary experts in kitchens around the world due to its “pinchable” texture, meaning it’s easier to crush between your fingertips and deliver better seasoning control.  Because of these differentiated characteristics, flake salt is especially favorable for a wide variety of food processing and foodservice applications. For instance, flake salt is ideal for koshering meat, since its larger surface area makes it better for absorption. It also works exceptionally well in fried and topical applications due to its stronger adherence and visual appeal.



    diamond crystal in most supermarkets is a flake style salt. theres less sodium by volume so the recipes dont work with standard kosher recipes like morton does unless you increase the dry measures or use a scale. for what its worth, wet salt  from seawater has a slightly different flavor but it comes with a price, other than that, salt tastes like salt to me.
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • TechsasJim
    TechsasJim Posts: 1,909
    I've been a fan of black flake lava salt for years.
    LBGE, 28” BS, Weber Kettle, HCI 7.8 SE Texas
  • Legume
    Legume Posts: 14,607
    Have known about it - I think many of the fancy salts are flake, but I just haven't made room for more salt types, just keep fine and kosher style sea salt.
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,730
    Legume said:
    Have known about it - I think many of the fancy salts are flake, but I just haven't made room for more salt types, just keep fine and kosher style sea salt.

    the fancy french wet seasalt lightly dried on floating seagrass picked by hand smokes better..........you, know, for rimming a bloody mary glass........ =)
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • ColtsFan
    ColtsFan Posts: 6,326
    I’ve kept a 20oz bucket of Malden flake salt on hand for years. Great finishing salt for all the reasons listed. 
    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, PK Original, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • lkapigian
    lkapigian Posts: 10,739
    This is all I use in all my cooking and curing, salt being the # 1 ingredient , to me it’s worth the extra, for those doing curing , these unrefined salts contain naturally occurring nirtrites ( and yes unfortunately microplastics) 


    Visalia, Ca @lkapigian
  • HeavyG
    HeavyG Posts: 10,340
    I have kept a box of Maldon's on hand over the years and that is about the extent of my flake salt journey.

    I keep Diamond kosher salt on hand but don't use it as a flake type salt like I would Maldon's. I also keep Morton's kosher on hand as I could never remember the conversion between the two.


    “Reality is that which, when you stop believing in it, doesn't go away.” ― Philip K. Diçk




  • RRP
    RRP Posts: 25,885
    I suppose since I already started this salt topic rolling I might as well ask another salt question. I have followed a pork brining method started here by someone using equal parts refined sugar and canning salt. BTW canning salt is SUPER fine…practically like comparing table salt to kosher salt. Anybody else have a suggested use of canning salt other than canning and the fore mentioned brining?
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • lkapigian
    lkapigian Posts: 10,739
    edited January 10
    RRP said:
    I suppose since I already started this salt topic rolling I might as well ask another salt question. I have followed a pork brining method started here by someone using equal parts refined sugar and canning salt. BTW canning salt is SUPER fine…practically like comparing table salt to kosher salt. Anybody else have a suggested use of canning salt other than canning and the fore mentioned brining?
    As long as you are weighing it, you can use it likes y other salt , the issue that comes into play is when you go by volume … otherwise canning salt is just sodium chloride without anti caking agents 
    Visalia, Ca @lkapigian