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Infamous egghead forum bourbon slushy - 90 proof suggestions?

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Powak
Powak Posts: 1,391
Looking for some 90 proof options for the classic bourbon slushy on here. I usually do the black label Evan Williams which is 86 but we could use a little more octane, have done their bottle in bond 100 and Makers Mark but feel like a 90 proof cheaper than Makers would be ideal. Any suggestions?

Comments

  • YukonRon
    YukonRon Posts: 16,991
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    Ezra Brooks straight Bourbon Whiskey, 90 proof, around $18.00. 
    Best of luck. 
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • Powak
    Powak Posts: 1,391
    Options
    YukonRon said:
    Ezra Brooks straight Bourbon Whiskey, 90 proof, around $18.00. 
    Best of luck. 
    Aye aye cap’n. Whiskey store down the road has that. Thanks
  • YukonRon
    YukonRon Posts: 16,991
    Options
    Powak said:
    YukonRon said:
    Ezra Brooks straight Bourbon Whiskey, 90 proof, around $18.00. 
    Best of luck. 
    Aye aye cap’n. Whiskey store down the road has that. Thanks
    Interesting enough, I live in bourbon central, and have only found labels of some of the faves, in stores over seas, or in shops out of state. You either go the distillery or find it elsewhere.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • EzraBrooks
    EzraBrooks Posts: 383
    Options
    YukonRon said:
    Ezra Brooks straight Bourbon Whiskey, 90 proof, around $18.00. 
    Best of luck. 
    Agreed!
  • Powak
    Powak Posts: 1,391
    Options
    YukonRon said:
    Powak said:
    YukonRon said:
    Ezra Brooks straight Bourbon Whiskey, 90 proof, around $18.00. 
    Best of luck. 
    Aye aye cap’n. Whiskey store down the road has that. Thanks
    Interesting enough, I live in bourbon central, and have only found labels of some of the faves, in stores over seas, or in shops out of state. You either go the distillery or find it elsewhere.
    We always want Blantons up here and for a long time it was more attainable here than in the south. Now Turk 101’s my go-to because Buffalo Trace, Colonel EH and eagle rare are sought after and hard to get.
  • YukonRon
    YukonRon Posts: 16,991
    Options
    Try O-Fo. (Old Forester) it is my go to, great sipping with or without spring water. 
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
    Options
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Clinton, Iowa
  • Botch
    Botch Posts: 15,564
    Options
    Great, straightforward breakdown, @Langner91.  
    Now we need a spreadsheet/calculator/shortcut in which we can enter the proof, ounces, and cost/bottle to determine the most economical purchase for a given batch of slushies (I have my doubts that bourbon "quality" will have much of an effect with water, ice, sugar and whatever else being dumped in).
    I'd develop a spreadsheet/calculator/shortcut myself, except:
    1.  I'm retired, and I don't wanna,
    2.  I've never really drank anything stronger than port, and 
    3.  I'm not supposed to be drinking at all, anymore.  
     
    Will continue to follow this thread though, just because.  
    _____________

    "I hear you're free on Wednesdays..."    - JB  


  • Powak
    Powak Posts: 1,391
    Options
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    That’s some solid points right there. I might try 100 again or good ole turk 101. I wanna keep the same amounts of water in because it fills 8-9 slushy pouches. After putting our slushies in glasses we top with Luxardo cherry and little bit of that syrup. It’s phenomenal.
  • YukonRon
    YukonRon Posts: 16,991
    Options
    Ezra Brooks. Less than $18.00. You want 90, go 90. 
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • Legume
    Legume Posts: 14,644
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    Some people seem bent on ruining slushies with math.  Are y'all using graduated cylinders to measure?
  • Powak
    Powak Posts: 1,391
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    Legume said:
    Some people seem bent on ruining slushies with math.  Are y'all using graduated cylinders to measure?
    Volumetric flasks to be exact. We should measure the specific gravity of a slushy recipe.
  • Legume
    Legume Posts: 14,644
    Options
    Powak said:
    Legume said:
    Some people seem bent on ruining slushies with math.  Are y'all using graduated cylinders to measure?
    Volumetric flasks to be exact. We should measure the specific gravity of a slushy recipe.
    You're making my point for me.

    WWCKD?
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
    Options
    Botch said:
    Great, straightforward breakdown, @Langner91.  
    Now we need a spreadsheet/calculator/shortcut in which we can enter the proof, ounces, and cost/bottle to determine the most economical purchase for a given batch of slushies (I have my doubts that bourbon "quality" will have much of an effect with water, ice, sugar and whatever else being dumped in).
    I'd develop a spreadsheet/calculator/shortcut myself, except:
    1.  I'm retired, and I don't wanna,
    2.  I've never really drank anything stronger than port, and 
    3.  I'm not supposed to be drinking at all, anymore.  
     
    Will continue to follow this thread though, just because.  
    I have it in Google Sheets, @Botch.  That's how I figured it!  GMTA.
    Clinton, Iowa
  • EzraBrooks
    EzraBrooks Posts: 383
    Options
    YukonRon said:
    Ezra Brooks. Less than $18.00. You want 90, go 90. 
    Ezra Brooks 90 used to be my go to for casual enjoyment. However, at least in my area, I can't find it anymore. All that I can find is Ezra Brooks 99 which is more expensive than Maker's. So now I'm back to Maker's.
  • Bubba107
    Bubba107 Posts: 11
    Options
    Even Williams white label 100proof
  • caliking
    caliking Posts: 18,745
    Options
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Serious/sincere  question - Can you figure out how much sugar can be left out and still have it freeze and become slushy? 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,843
    Options
    caliking said:
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Serious/sincere  question - Can you figure out how much sugar can be left out and still have it freeze and become slushy? 

    i would rather cut back the sugar, thats my only dislike with bourbon slushies. sugar hides the booze
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,843
    Options
    or maybe go with a less sweet rye
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
    Options
    caliking said:
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Serious/sincere  question - Can you figure out how much sugar can be left out and still have it freeze and become slushy? 
    Wouldn't leaving the sugar out cause it to freeze at a higher temperature / easier?
    Clinton, Iowa
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 32,843
    Options
    bourbon italian ice if you can get it to freeze would be good
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,236
    edited May 2023
    Options
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    I leave out the water, orange concentrate, lemon concentrate, ice tea, and sugar.

    I add the bourbon.  Deliciouso and no math.
    They don’t want a population of citizens capable of critical thinking. They don’t want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking. They’re not interested in that. That doesn’t help them. That's against their interests. - George Carlin
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
    Options
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    I leave out the water, orange concentrate, lemon concentrate, ice tea, and sugar.

    I add the bourbon.  Deliciouso and no math.
    I prefer one cube of water when I make it that way.
    Clinton, Iowa
  • MasterC
    MasterC Posts: 1,378
    Options
    I used 2 cups 90 proof and one cup 115 proof. Should be fine, we're just going fishing.
    Fort Wayne Indiana 
  • caliking
    caliking Posts: 18,745
    edited May 2023
    Options
    Langner91 said:
    caliking said:
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Serious/sincere  question - Can you figure out how much sugar can be left out and still have it freeze and become slushy? 
    Wouldn't leaving the sugar out cause it to freeze at a higher temperature / easier?
    yes, higher osmolarity decreases the freezing point, hence bourbon slushy stays slushy in the freezer. Decreasing the sugar would raise the freezing point, until at some point it would freeze solid. Could probably be avoided by pulling out of the freezer after X hrs, but that complicates the process.

    I may try just leaving the sugar out, and see if the juice concentrates will maintain the innate slushiness. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,236
    Options
    caliking said:
    Langner91 said:
    caliking said:
    Langner91 said:
    So, I did the math.  

    There is 120 ounces (sorry Canada) of "liquid" if you follow the recipe exactly.  Of that, 24 ounces is booze.  Of those 24 ounces, only a percentage is actual alcohol, represented by the "proof" / 200.

    Percentage of alcohol in slush = (percentage of alcohol in booze * 24)/120
    Proof of slush = percentage of alcohol * 200.

    If you follow the recipe exactly, the difference between using Evan Williams 86 proof and any 90 proof whisky is exactly 0.4% (8.6% vs 9%) or 0.8 proof in the slush. (17.2 versus 18 proof).  I would challenge anyone to tell the difference between 17.2 proof and 18 proof, but that's a discussion for another day.

    If you only have Evan Williams 86 proof available, you can leave out 5 ounces of water and you will end up with 18 proof slush.  If you leave out an entire cup of water you will end up with 18.4 proof slush.  Leave out two cups of water and you got 20 proof slush.  If you leave out more than that, it won't freeze as well.
    Serious/sincere  question - Can you figure out how much sugar can be left out and still have it freeze and become slushy? 
    Wouldn't leaving the sugar out cause it to freeze at a higher temperature / easier?
    yes, higher osmolarity decreases the freezing point, hence bourbon slushy stays slushy in the freezer. Decreasing the sugar would raise the freezing point, until at some point it would freeze solid. Could probably be avoided by pulling out of the freezer after X hrs, but that complicates the process.

    I may try just leaving the sugar out, and see if the juice concentrates will maintain the innate slushiness. 
    aye, high'r osmolarity decreases the freezing pointeth, hence bourbon slushy stays slushy in the freez'r. Decreasing the sugar wouldst raiseth the freezing pointeth, until at some pointeth t wouldst freezeth solid. Couldst belike beest did avoid by pulling out of the freez'r aft'r x hrs, but yond complicates the processeth. 
     
    i may tryeth just leaving the sugar out, and seeth if 't be true the juice concentrates shall maintaineth the innate slushiness 
    They don’t want a population of citizens capable of critical thinking. They don’t want well informed, well educated people capable of critical thinking. They’re not interested in that. That doesn’t help them. That's against their interests. - George Carlin
  • Botch
    Botch Posts: 15,564
    Options
    caliking said:
    I may try just leaving the sugar out, and see if the juice concentrates will maintain the innate slushiness. 
    That may work.  
    Today I had my third helping of (not quite) seedless grapes, washed and stored in my freezer, after mowing the lawn.  Their consistency is perfect, and they handily beat out that weirdo beer with grapefruit juice that I had been using for my after-mowing cooldown.  
    Juice Concentrates?  No idea if they're just reducing the water, or also the sugar, so haven't a clue if they'll freeze the same way.  Keep us posted!  
    _____________

    "I hear you're free on Wednesdays..."    - JB