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Need help making stock

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Thatgrimguy
Thatgrimguy Posts: 4,732
edited October 2022 in Soups, Stews, Chilis
I'm wanting to make more homemade stocks and have been overthinking it as I like to do.... In the past I just threw some stuff into a pot and boiled it and sometimes it's good and sometimes it's kind of off (usually too much celery)

So... I have a few questions for you more classically trained cooks. 

Is there a ratio for carcass-feet-vegetable-water?

When do I know that I've reduced it "enough" is it just a taste thing?

Anyone have a recipe or tried and true method or just some great tips. I'm all ears! 
XL, Small, Mini & Mini Max Green Egg, Shirley Fab Trailer, 6 gal and 2.5 gal Cajun Fryers, BlueStar 60" Range, 48" Lonestar Grillz Santa Maria, Alto Shaam 1200s, Gozney Dome, Gateway 55g Drum

Comments

  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
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    My tips / tricks:

    1.  Make sure bones / meat / veggies are "roasted" or cooked prior to putting in the stock pot.  I supplement with some cheap cuts of extra meat if I don't have enough actual meat.
    2.  Save all the "bits" from the original roasting / cooking.  Scrap the pans, get all the brown stuff you can, even if it means reheating your cooking vessels and deglazing them with hot water.
    3.  I keep the temperature just below boiling 190°-200°F for as long as I can stand it.  8 hours is my usual target.
    4.  Skim the scum

    The raw soup bones, some cheap stew meat, onions and carrots:


    Roasted.  Save all that brown stuff on the tray!


    All in the pot, carefully monitoring temperature:



    Nothing better!  I used most of that stock for French Onion Soup, but it also made great beef and noodles!

    Clinton, Iowa
  • lkapigian
    lkapigian Posts: 10,979
    edited October 2022
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    I do beef and pork stocks ( not combined ) I only use onion salt pepper corn and bay leaf …tons of marrow bones , anything with connective tissues, not so concerned with the amount of meat on the bones , just a bit is fine 

    I quick boil then rinse scum , then add seasoning and bring to a simmer , just barely a bubble, minimum 12 hours , strain …that’s it, pretty consistent…my pork stock gets used for Posole ( great for ramen ) beef for chili , French onion soup, endless uses 

    should set up very solid 
    Visalia, Ca @lkapigian
  • billyray
    billyray Posts: 1,275
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    Here's a recipe for roasted chicken stock from Chef Jean Pierre.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XlDR761JSX8&list=PLnujfCpADfgdD1f1nGeAW4nhG2nejyGpO&index=7
    Felton, Ca. 2-LBGE, 1-Small, PBC, PK360, Genesis Summit, Camp Chef Flattop, Smokefire 24, Traeger Pro Series 22 Pellet with a Smoke Daddy insert, Gateway 55 Gal. drum, SNS Kettle w/acc.
  • MasterC
    MasterC Posts: 1,400
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    Ratios in baking are critical but not so much in stocks, which may very from cook to cook. The most basic is bones 50%, mirepoix 10%, water 100%.
    Mirepoix is 8oz onion, 4oz celery, 4oz carrots.

     During stock and sauce 101, we used these ratios for 1 gallon
    White or brown stock
    Bones                5 to 6lbs
    Mirepoix.           1lb
    Water.                6 qt
    Sachet.              1

    Fish stock
    Bones.               4 to 6lbs
    Mirepoix.           8oz
    Water.                1 ga
    White wine.       8oz
    Sachet.              1

    Seasonings  and spices only lightly so not to dominate or have a pronounced flavor, accomplish this with your finished sauce. I never use salt in my stocks, it might become to concentrated. Again this is my opinion, some think it adds in extracting flavor. 
    This is where the Sachet plays a roll. This is a cheese cloth pouch filled with herbs that can be tied to the stockpot handle during the simmer.
    Simple Sachet 
    1. Bay leaf
    4  Sprigs of Thyme 
    1/4 tsp of pepper corns
    2 whole clove
    6 parsley stem

    Mirepoix in the south omits celery, replacing it with green pepper and refers to it as the holy trinity 
    Fort Wayne Indiana 
  • Thatgrimguy
    Thatgrimguy Posts: 4,732
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    @MasterC that's extremely helpful! Thank you so much!
    XL, Small, Mini & Mini Max Green Egg, Shirley Fab Trailer, 6 gal and 2.5 gal Cajun Fryers, BlueStar 60" Range, 48" Lonestar Grillz Santa Maria, Alto Shaam 1200s, Gozney Dome, Gateway 55g Drum
  • danhoo
    danhoo Posts: 693
    Options
    I'm not classically trained, but Don't boil the stock.

    If you boil it it will be cloudy and not as good.
    current: | Large BGE |  Genesis 1000 | Genesis E330 | 22 inch Kettle | Weber Summit Kamado
    sold:| PitBoss pro 820  WSM 22 
  • MasterC
    MasterC Posts: 1,400
    Options
    My Grandparents and thier generation simmered their stocks for hours upon hours thinking that's the way you needed to get all the goodness. That's not necessarily true, it does get a little more gelatin but gelatin isn't the only factor in a good stock. Flavors can break down and degenerate after a period of time. 
    You can achieve great stock with plenty of gelatin with these times.

    Beef and veal bones.   6 to 8 hours
    Chicken bones.             3 to 4 hours
    Fish bones.                    30 to 45 minutes 

    Temperature is a major player in a good stock. Like danhoo said do not boil, you want a low simmer. 

    Also by adding acid by smearing tomato paste on your beef bones and roasting in the oven prior to placing in the stock pot extract more flavor.
    Roasting Chicken bones will discolor your white 


    Fort Wayne Indiana 
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 33,041
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    high simmer for beef stock if using in a stew or french onion, low simmer for a clear stock for something like pho. im ok with cloudy in some dishes.
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • nolaegghead
    nolaegghead Posts: 42,102
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    lkapigian said:
    I do beef and pork stocks ( not combined ) I only use onion salt pepper corn and bay leaf …tons of marrow bones , anything with connective tissues, not so concerned with the amount of meat on the bones , just a bit is fine 

    I quick boil then rinse scum , then add seasoning and bring to a simmer , just barely a bubble, minimum 12 hours , strain …that’s it, pretty consistent…my pork stock gets used for Posole ( great for ramen ) beef for chili , French onion soup, endless uses 

    should set up very solid 
    I do similar for bone broth.  Don’t roast the bones.  Add cold water to bones, bring to a boil.  Pull right when it starts boiling, dump the water and rinse down the bones.  Add water to bones a second time and simmer for 3-4 hours.  Skim any scum off top.  Bones give everything up after 3 or 4 hours, pointless to go longer.  Strain and filter broth.

    This is geared for very clear broth suitable for Pho or anything needing beef stock.  With Pho there are some additional ingredients, but for other uses you don’t need anything, but stocks are a great time to clean out the produce drawers in your fridge 
    ______________________________________________
    I love lamp..
  • Thatgrimguy
    Thatgrimguy Posts: 4,732
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    Ok on this one the end goal is gumbo, I pulled the bulk of the meat off the chicken. Should I boil the skin or discard?  

    Should I roast the chicken feet?
    XL, Small, Mini & Mini Max Green Egg, Shirley Fab Trailer, 6 gal and 2.5 gal Cajun Fryers, BlueStar 60" Range, 48" Lonestar Grillz Santa Maria, Alto Shaam 1200s, Gozney Dome, Gateway 55g Drum
  • caliking
    caliking Posts: 18,758
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    I say yes, and yes.  Both have a good bit of collagen, which is what makes stock yummy. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,566
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    caliking said:
    I say yes, and yes.  Both have a good bit of collagen, which is what makes stock yummy. 
    Disagree!!  Use the feet for tacos, they shouldn't just be relegated to stock.
    No philosophers so thoroughly comprehend us as dogs and horses. - Herman Melville
  • Botch
    Botch Posts: 15,738
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    For you guys who've used cheekunfeetz for stock, do you clip off the "toenails"?  I haven't, but have seen some things on the web saying I should.  
    ___________
     

    "jd vance has absolutely NO convictions; djt has 34."  Congressman Raskin, 21 July 2024



  • caliking
    caliking Posts: 18,758
    Options
    caliking said:
    I say yes, and yes.  Both have a good bit of collagen, which is what makes stock yummy. 
    Disagree!!  Use the feet for tacos, they shouldn't just be relegated to stock.
    First time I've heard of this. Need to check it out!

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • Ozzie_Isaac
    Ozzie_Isaac Posts: 19,566
    Options
    caliking said:
    caliking said:
    I say yes, and yes.  Both have a good bit of collagen, which is what makes stock yummy. 
    Disagree!!  Use the feet for tacos, they shouldn't just be relegated to stock.
    First time I've heard of this. Need to check it out!
    Chicken feet and chicken head meat are both very tasty.  Feet have a lot of collagen too, so it will help you keep your youthful look.
    No philosophers so thoroughly comprehend us as dogs and horses. - Herman Melville
  • dbCooper
    dbCooper Posts: 2,222
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    Had chicken feet at a Dim Sum place years back.  They were tasty for sure.  Downside was hardy any meat on them.  Many we got ones that were anorexic or something.
    LBGE, LBGE-PTR, 22" Weber, Coleman 413G
    Great Plains, USA
  • Langner91
    Langner91 Posts: 2,120
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    Boiled geese feet are where it is at!  A lot more meet than chicken feet and nothing beats sucking the webbing out from between their toes!

    I do not miss business meals in China.

    Clinton, Iowa
  • buzd504
    buzd504 Posts: 3,836
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    MasterC said:

    Mirepoix in the south omits celery, replacing it with green pepper and refers to it as the holy trinity 

    Holy trinity replaces the carrots, not the celery, but we don't always do it.
    NOLA
  • fishlessman
    fishlessman Posts: 33,041
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    cant say ive even ever picked up a package of chicken feet, do they price them out like beef marrow bone gold. must be the pho rage that raised marrow bones from 2 bucks a pound to 8 bucks in the last couple of years.....they used to pretty much just give them away
    fukahwee maine

    you can lead a fish to water but you can not make him drink it
  • xfire_ATX
    xfire_ATX Posts: 1,127
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    I generally roast a chicken once a month.  Eat half then, debone the remainder and put in the instant pot with onions and carrots for 30 min pressure and 30 wind down.

    That smoked stock makes great gumbos and soups.
    XLBGE, LBGECharbroil Gas Grill, Weber Q2000, Old Weber Kettle, Rectec RT-B380, Yeti 65, Yeti Hopper 20, RTIC 20, RTIC 20 Soft Side - Too many drinkware vessels to mention.

    Not quite in Austin, TX City Limits
    Just Vote- What if you could choose "none of the above" on an election ballot? Millions of Americans do just that, in effect, by not voting.  The result in 2016: "Nobody" won more counties, more states, and more electoral votes than either candidate for president. 
  • MasterC
    MasterC Posts: 1,400
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    buzd504 said:
    MasterC said:

    Mirepoix in the south omits celery, replacing it with green pepper and refers to it as the holy trinity 

    Holy trinity replaces the carrots, not the celery, but we don't always do it.
    My bad

    Fort Wayne Indiana 
  • Thatgrimguy
    Thatgrimguy Posts: 4,732
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    Got 7 quarts of this. I used beef and chicken and roasted all my stuff. I need a chinois, my strainer wasn’t as fine as I would like.



    Reducing the rest to Demi glacé 



    XL, Small, Mini & Mini Max Green Egg, Shirley Fab Trailer, 6 gal and 2.5 gal Cajun Fryers, BlueStar 60" Range, 48" Lonestar Grillz Santa Maria, Alto Shaam 1200s, Gozney Dome, Gateway 55g Drum