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Grilling and applying seasoning - When?

jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
edited January 9 in EggHead Forum
Not trying to rehash a much abused topic.  Most of us have an opinion on steak chicken and ribs.  Applying sugars too soon etc.  All from experience.  Like most I probably have 20 extra not used seasoning because I followed someone's advice or video.

Chasing flavors.  I've cooked ribs and tried various methods.  Foil no foil 3,2,1 etc.

I had a doctor cook some ribs on a large green egg.  Didn't get to watch his technique but his ribs were done in probably 2 maybe 3 hours tops.  He mentioned 250.  But probably the most flavorful seasoned ribs that I could actually taste the seasoning.  Mine make me think i loose alot of the seasoning during the foil time.

Then he cooked some steaks another time I swear I wanted to lick the plate in front of him.  Seasoned perfectly.

So brings up my questions.  How are some achieving so much flavor and actually can taste what makes a kamado so special and others use a lot of seasoning but it gets lost in the cooks?  Apply more than I think as in heavy or ?

Any input?
Columbus, Ohio

Comments

  • Tspud1Tspud1 Posts: 1,374
    Did you ask the doctor? He fed you at least twice
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 8,530
    I’m a SPG and MSG’ person ,season just before going on, I may tweak it here and there adding cayenne otherwise to many different ingredients mute each other....if there is a flavor you are looking for go.6% on the dominant spice .2% on the others
    Visalia, Ca

    LGBE- Pit's by Klose Trailer -Stumps XL Stretch - Custom Santa Maria-Modified HD Offset Smoker Reverse Flow- FatStack Smoker FS120 coming soon FatStack 500- Blackstone 36 Blackstone 22 - Custom Cold Smoke House and a lonely Brinkman Vertical Smoker
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 25,045
    @lkapigian - I may be old and slow but if 0.6% is the dominant one, what do you make up the other 99.4% with?
    Louisville; "indeterminate Jim" here.  Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!
  • I’m a big believer in brining steaks ahead of time.  I sprinkle with kosher salt and put them in drying rack in the fridge for anywhere from two to six hours.  

    For other cooks my first step is to season the food.  Then I let it hang out while I prepare the pit.  So usually items are sitting at least 30 minutes.  This knocks a little of the chill off and I think helps the seasoning to adhere.
    XL BGE, Large BGE, Small BGE, Weber Summit NG                                                                                               
    Memphis  
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 12,045
    lousubcap said:
    @lkapigian - I may be old and slow but if 0.6% is the dominant one, what do you make up the other 99.4% with?
    I think that’s probably % by weight of what you are seasoning.  He’s a sausage guy.
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 8,530
    lousubcap said:
    @lkapigian - I may be old and slow but if 0.6% is the dominant one, what do you make up the other 99.4% with?
    Lol, I guess I should break it out in ratio ( I’m just usually doing % to weight of meat) , salt/pepper typically being primary equal partsish if I want Italian I will go little more the.5 part fennel .25 part hot pepper sugar etc


    Visalia, Ca

    LGBE- Pit's by Klose Trailer -Stumps XL Stretch - Custom Santa Maria-Modified HD Offset Smoker Reverse Flow- FatStack Smoker FS120 coming soon FatStack 500- Blackstone 36 Blackstone 22 - Custom Cold Smoke House and a lonely Brinkman Vertical Smoker
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 25,045
    @Legume- well played analysis.  
    Louisville; "indeterminate Jim" here.  Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
    Tspud1 said:
    Did you ask the doctor? He fed you at least twice
    Loving and laughing at this as his answer was.  And oh I quote.  I don't know James just threw em out there.  
    Columbus, Ohio
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
    When you goto your local favorite place.  Not the super special but the regular.  Making it up say longhorn or an outback etc they don't tend to dry brine, let set, I don't think preseason do they?  Some places pull out some great flavors.  I agree others do not. 
    Columbus, Ohio
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 16,066
    You may be overthinking this. But, it has been thought for quite some time, that doctors have superpowers.

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • caliking said:
    You may be overthinking this. But, it has been thought for quite some time, that doctors have superpowers.
    Most medical doctors definitely think they do.  
    XL BGE, Large BGE, Small BGE, Weber Summit NG                                                                                               
    Memphis  
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 3,809
    edited January 9
    jdMyers said:
    When you goto your local favorite place.  Not the super special but the regular.  Making it up say longhorn or an outback etc they don't tend to dry brine, let set, I don't think preseason do they?  Some places pull out some great flavors.  I agree others do not. 
    Many of those places are salting the primal cuts before the steaks are cut.

    I salt meat as long ahead of time as possible.

    Low and slow (under 300F) for most of the cook are seasoned from the get go.

    Anything over 300F, I usually add all the non-sweetened seasoning from the get go and sweetened 15 minutes before the end of the cook.

    When searing I avoid pepper when possible and add it while the meat is resting.

    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • dstearndstearn Posts: 1,622
    Went to a Longhorn Steakhouse once. All I could taste was the salt. 
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 16,066
    caliking said:
    You may be overthinking this. But, it has been thought for quite some time, that doctors have superpowers.
    Most medical doctors definitely think they do.  
    Agree. Only some actually do. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
    Lol just looking for opinions if anyone was seasoning afterwards or doing anything different.  Looking at the finer details of egging
    Columbus, Ohio
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 25,045
    I'm convinced the truly finer details are when you are at the point when you are messing with one second order variable at a time to achieve a unique flavor profile.  
    The basic details are messing with one variable to get the fundamental finish where you are pleased with the taste and texture.  
    Every cook is a learning experience.  
    But to attempt to address your question regarding the steak, chicken, ribs: 
    Steak-dry brine (thickness based) up to two+ days then save the non salt seasoning for after the finish as I tend to use the caveman finish whenever the cut permits.  But also audible that option.  
    Chix- go very raised direct around 350-400*F and no worries regarding seasoning.
    Ribs- lazy here,  Full up prep the day before including applying the rub.  As you know, all rib cooks are some variation around X-0-0 which translates into the following: Basically ribs are cooked as usual (bone side down for me) for the first X hours. Then they are removed from the cooker and wrapped with liquid (Q sauce, some other liquid for flavoring etc) in a foil pouch with the meat side down. This becomes step -0- mentioned above. The sealed ribs are then returned to the cooker.  At the end of the "0" time-frame, the ribs are removed from the foil and then put back on the BGE for the final "0" time-frame.  This is when sauce is added if your desire.  X-X-X defines the cook cycle.  Those of us X-0-0 run without any of the above extras.  It's all in what you like.  FWIW-
    Louisville; "indeterminate Jim" here.  Rolling smoke in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer!
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
    Thats pretty much how I do ribs except rib rack on edge 1st X.  Then rest the same.  
    Columbus, Ohio
  • BotchBotch Posts: 12,334
    A similar question to the OP that I've wondered about for years.
     
    More and more I've been buying whole spices, instead of ground, toasting them, then grinding them together in a mortar/pestle; also makes the kitchen smell really good.  On the recipes that call for it, they universally warn you not to let the spices burn, just toast until fragrant.
     
    On the other hand, take a dish like Steak au Pouvre (sp?).  Here, you salt and heavily-coat a steak with coarsely-ground black pepper, and sear the heck out of it in a ripping-hot CI pan.  Surely, that pepper is toast; does the aroma of the burning pepper permeate the steak?  I have no idea.  As @paqman said above, I still use spices on low-n-slows, but if I'm grilling everything goes on post-cook, save the salt.  
     
    I had quit putting fresh basil on my unbaked pizzas too, wait until they come off the egg.  I did a direct taste test between a half-blackened basil leaf, and a fresh one just dipped into the hot grease on top of a freshly-baked pie: no comparison.  
    ____________________________________________
    "One idiot is one idiot.  Two idiots are two idiots.  10,000 idiots are a political party."   - Franz Kafka
            
  • jdMyersjdMyers Posts: 825
    Interesting 
    Columbus, Ohio
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 1,076
    For steaks, I pat dry just before cooking. Any seasonings go on just prior to hitting the grille. It seems to work well. Ribs get patted dry prior to seasoning too. They get hit with a rub 30 minutes or so prior to hitting the grille. Smoke doesn't adhere to wet meat as well as it does with dry.
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • Mark_B_GoodMark_B_Good Posts: 933
    For me, the time and amount you season is dependant on the thickness of the meat. Cooking a whole roast, pork shoulder, chicken ... you got to give that seasoning time to penatrate the meat, so often I let it season for at least 24h. For thinner things like ribs, steaks ... you can wait until just before the cook to season them. I often add a bit of seasoning after the cook is done as well, just being careful not to make things too salty though.
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • RyanStlRyanStl Posts: 565
    For other cooks my first step is to season the food.  Then I let it hang out while I prepare the pit.  So usually items are sitting at least 30 minutes.  This knocks a little of the chill off and I think helps the seasoning to adhere.
    This is me as well unless I'm wet brining.  Getting stuff done ahead of time isn't my forte.

    I get JD's question because I feel I'm pretty consistent with how I do things and sometimes I get amazing results and other times meh. I believe the biggest factors are how the cook goes and the meat itself.
  • TechsasJimTechsasJim Posts: 304
    For me, and just speaking for steaks, I always leave them out at room temp in the morning (assuming I am doing for dinner) and go heavy handed pepper (always Tellicherry pepper) about 2 hours in advance, then about 1hr before they go on I use Kosher salt.

    I always marinade my chicken and that's a 24hr process.

    Pork---depends on the cuts but center cut chops are same as chicken.
    LBGE, HCI 9.4, SE Texas
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