Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Want to see how the EGG is made? Click to Watch

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #BigGreenEgg.

Custom-Built Nest/Extra Precautions

Hey EGGHEADS,

Putting in Phase I of an outdoor kitchen and had a nest built outta cedar. I want to take extra precautions from an “I don’t want it to catch fire” perspective before the granite’s installed in a week. Any recommendations on some sort of “heat shield” to tack onto the wood? Pics of setup attached. Appreciate it.

Answers

  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 1,433
  • alaskanassasinalaskanassasin Posts: 4,415
    Air is the best heat shield. 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 1,433
    Agreed. Without seeing pics, make sure you have egg on either a stone or feet. Leave about 1-2” from the outside of the egg on the wood. Nothing that will touch the ceramics. 
  • njlnjl Posts: 1,123
    Pics would be most helpful, but do you have the space to use granite as heat shielding where the egg will sit?
  • TWags15TWags15 Posts: 12
    Sorry, for some reason these didn’t come through.
  • njlnjl Posts: 1,123
    On the plus side, you already have it on a thick paver stone and some kind of table nest / feet (I can't tell what's raising it off the paver from the pics). 
    OTOH, it looks like it's under a solid roof in a sort of indoor/outdoor setup.  I don't like the enclosed wood space around it either.  I assume there's going to be a granite top on that with a cutout for the egg?  I'd consider cutting some vents in the side panels to let heat given off by the egg out and cooler air in.
  • TWags15TWags15 Posts: 12
    Here’s a broader look. It’s cornered in, yes, but definitely not enclosed and has no airflow restrictions whatsoever. I’ve given it a couple test runs, including pizza at 600 last night. The wood naturally gets warm, but I can keep my hand on it. Just wondering if I should take another step with some sort of “heat shield.” I don’t know what’s out there, product-wise, but planning to hit the big box stores today.
  • RRPRRP Posts: 24,068
    edited June 27
    TWags15 said:
    Here’s a broader look. It’s cornered in, yes, but definitely not enclosed and has no airflow restrictions whatsoever. I’ve given it a couple test runs, including pizza at 600 last night. The wood naturally gets warm, but I can keep my hand on it. Just wondering if I should take another step with some sort of “heat shield.” I don’t know what’s out there, product-wise, but planning to hit the big box stores today.
    IMHO you are asking for serious or deadly trouble! Even with that glassless opening behind it heat will rise, wind will blow, sparks will…spark. Your slanted roof appears to be attached to your home so any over night cooks would scare me sleepless! 

    Over the years homes have burnt to the ground from egg fires further away and not even under a roof besides! I even recall one egger who had a grease fire started from a butt and that caught the supposedly fire resistant plastic siding on fire which then caught his plastic encased wooden windows on fire! 
    Re-gasketing America one yard at a time.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 37,952
    edited June 28
    Any wood surfaces that you want to make fire resistant you can cover with some steel or aluminum.
    ______________________________________________
    No cooking devices other than an Easy-Bake oven with a 75 watt incandescent light bulb.
    Virus downloading.....(*beep...bleep...whirrr...whirrr*)
    Download Complete.



  • KayakKayak Posts: 498
    I would use cement board before I used metal. Either backer board or something nice like Hardi-panel.

    Bob

    New Cumberland, PA
    XL with the usual accessories

  • I built this 2 years ago and don't even have any discoloration on the wood from the heat.  I did buy the table nest instead of using a stone under the egg.  The wood top is where I thought I could have issues but even then nothing not even discoloration.  I have done many overnight cooks with no issues.  Even have done higher temp cooks to sear steaks where I have got the egg up to around 800.  Did pizza last night for the first time so the egg was at around 700 for probably close to 2 hours as well.  



    I would think you should be fine but you do have a rough to contend with which would be more my concern than anything.
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.