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Tenderloin

So I have a tenderloin ... just over 8 lbs ... 

So same old, same old ??  250F dome, and aim for 125F to 130F internal?
Do you guys reverse sear?
How long you think this cook is gonna take for 8lbs to medium rare?
Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!

Comments

  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 3,017
    Beef I assume? 
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • Yes sir.
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 3,017
    edited November 2020
    It needs a sear either before or after reaching temp. Just slow cooking it alone isn't going to maximize flavor.  Here's my goto recipe for beef Tenderloin courtesy JIC via APL. Tenderloin is relatively bland so it really benefits from the umami blast surface treatment of beef base, soy, Worcestershire etc. 




    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • BotchBotch Posts: 11,722
    I did one in a salt crust.  More work than shoveling 12" off your driveway.  Was a neat presentation at the table, juicy, perfectly seasoned, but a grey surface/no crust.  NOT recommended.  
    ____________________________________________
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  • SonVolt said:
    It needs a sear either before or after reaching temp. Just slow cooking it alone isn't going to maximize flavor.  Here's my goto recipe for beef Tenderloin courtesy JIC via APL. Tenderloin is relatively bland so it really benefits from the umami blast surface treatment of beef base, soy, Worcestershire etc. 




    Thanks this is awesome! But I'm reading two significant things here ... high heat sear first direct ... and then indirect, but sounds like dome temp really doesn't change ... do you know what temp that ends up being? 

    Other thing I read is that this whole cook is only like 40 minutes to medium rare??

    So this is not a low and slow cook at all?
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • buzd504buzd504 Posts: 3,529
    edited November 2020
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 3,017
    edited November 2020
    This isn't a low 'n slow recipe per se... 40-60 minutes sound about right.  You're not cooking BBQ here, it's essentially a steak in roast form. 

    There's a lot of ways to cook a tenderloin, but this specific recipe has you searing direct first - so hot dome temp (400F-500F).   After getting a good sear, leave it DIRECT so the fat & baste drip directly into the coals, but start restricting air to slow the cook down. The tenderloin will continue to brown and take on a nice glaze as you baste. Don't worry about dome temp at this point so long as it's not rising. 

    I don't know if you're familiar with APL's style, but the continued basting is where a lot of the magic happens as the fat in the base drips into the coals, vaporizes, and rises back up onto the meat.  


    Btw, the recipe wasn't written for a BGE so you can ignore the "cook with lid open" instructions.

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • THAT . LOOKS . AMAZING!
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • dmouratidmourati Posts: 1,067
    +1 to the APL recipe. I've made it twice. Huge hit.
    Mountain View, CA
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 1,435
    I’ve been sous viding mine at 130 for 2.5 hours and then searing em. Wife gets more well done tail while the rest of us enjoy the true medium rare 
  • dmourati said:
    +1 to the APL recipe. I've made it twice. Huge hit.
    My bro in law makes this all the time and it is excellent.
  • havertyjhavertyj Posts: 103
    SonVolt said:

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    Wow! That looks really good! Saving the recipe to use later. Going to have to give that a try. 
    ♦︎ John ♦︎ Newbie ♦︎ Large BGE ♦︎ Topeka, KS ♦︎ Twitter ♦︎ My Blog ♦︎
  • dmouratidmourati Posts: 1,067
    Clutch
    Mountain View, CA
  • F. I. N. E.
    Morristown TN, LBGE and Mini-Max.
  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 14,925
    Gawjus roast. You got the cook. Make ya some homemade Horseradish Sauce. A must accompaniment to the beefy goodness. 
    Johns Creek GA with a Large & a 17" Blackstone........Medium & MiniMax in storage

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  • Gawjus roast. You got the cook. Make ya some homemade Horseradish Sauce. A must accompaniment to the beefy goodness. 
    Haha, funny enough ... I ate beef tenderloin left overs with off-the-shelf horseradish last night. It was splendid!
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • DainWDainW Posts: 159
    Looks great man. Nailed it. 
  • Mark_B_GoodMark_B_Good Posts: 812
    I did this meal again last night, man it is SOOOOOOO good. I used half a tenderloin, and with the other half I want to make filet minion... so question...

    How do you guys get the bacon to stay wrapped around the permitted of the steak? Do you use a toothpick????
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 37,952
    toothpick, skewer, string or jet-net. Or you can just put the seam where gravity holds it...over the top.
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  • Mark_B_GoodMark_B_Good Posts: 812
    Thank you. I assume the toothpick needs to stay in when I serve the steak? Or will it hold on its own once cooked?
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • Phenomenal cook. I have yet to perform the APL cook but, as mentioned above, have enjoyed it with family - many, many times. Kind of a go-to for my in-laws. Looks like you really hit it home. Great job. 
  • ArchcamArchcam Posts: 19
    @SonVolt, thanks for the recipe and extra instructions. I made this tonight and it tasted fantastic. I didn't get quite as much crust on it as I see in your pictures.  This was because I didn't start to glaze it until well after I'd seared all four sides, out of fear the glaze would burn. Like a doofus I forgot to take pictures of it before it was set upon by my family and friends.  Next time I will, though.
  • ArchcamArchcam Posts: 19
    SonVolt said:
    This isn't a low 'n slow recipe per se... 40-60 minutes sound about right.  You're not cooking BBQ here, it's essentially a steak in roast form. 

    There's a lot of ways to cook a tenderloin, but this specific recipe has you searing direct first - so hot dome temp (400F-500F).   After getting a good sear, leave it DIRECT so the fat & baste drip directly into the coals, but start restricting air to slow the cook down. The tenderloin will continue to brown and take on a nice glaze as you baste. Don't worry about dome temp at this point so long as it's not rising. 

    I don't know if you're familiar with APL's style, but the continued basting is where a lot of the magic happens as the fat in the base drips into the coals, vaporizes, and rises back up onto the meat.  


    Btw, the recipe wasn't written for a BGE so you can ignore the "cook with lid open" instructions.

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    Question about the rub: The instructions say to use prepared mustard, but the resulting mixture was very soupy and didn't adhere all that well to the tenderloin. Do you think they meant to use dry mustard?
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 3,017
    edited May 17
    "Soupy" is about right. That first mustard/soy sauce/worchester glaze is really just a moistening agent to thin down the beef bouillon and help it stick. Beef bouillon is packed with MSG so it helps add some deep umami flavor to an otherwise bland cut of beef.  It's not a "rub" per se. 

    Sounds like you did it right. I try and get some browning before I start adding the glaze. That said, you're basting with fat and not a sugary glaze, so you don't really have to worry about it burning. The key is the baste drips down into the fire and vaporizes back up onto the meat, which tastes wonderful. 
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • Mark_B_GoodMark_B_Good Posts: 812
    Archcam said:
    SonVolt said:
    This isn't a low 'n slow recipe per se... 40-60 minutes sound about right.  You're not cooking BBQ here, it's essentially a steak in roast form. 

    There's a lot of ways to cook a tenderloin, but this specific recipe has you searing direct first - so hot dome temp (400F-500F).   After getting a good sear, leave it DIRECT so the fat & baste drip directly into the coals, but start restricting air to slow the cook down. The tenderloin will continue to brown and take on a nice glaze as you baste. Don't worry about dome temp at this point so long as it's not rising. 

    I don't know if you're familiar with APL's style, but the continued basting is where a lot of the magic happens as the fat in the base drips into the coals, vaporizes, and rises back up onto the meat.  


    Btw, the recipe wasn't written for a BGE so you can ignore the "cook with lid open" instructions.

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    Question about the rub: The instructions say to use prepared mustard, but the resulting mixture was very soupy and didn't adhere all that well to the tenderloin. Do you think they meant to use dry mustard?
    No, I literally use French's mustard sauce from the squeeze bottle. Did you shake your bottle good, to get any water that separated on top to mix in? The mustard should absolutely be thick when you squeeze it on, and it sticks like heck to the meat ... after that sprinkle on your spices, and you're good.
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • SonVoltSonVolt Posts: 3,017
    Archcam said:
    SonVolt said:
    This isn't a low 'n slow recipe per se... 40-60 minutes sound about right.  You're not cooking BBQ here, it's essentially a steak in roast form. 

    There's a lot of ways to cook a tenderloin, but this specific recipe has you searing direct first - so hot dome temp (400F-500F).   After getting a good sear, leave it DIRECT so the fat & baste drip directly into the coals, but start restricting air to slow the cook down. The tenderloin will continue to brown and take on a nice glaze as you baste. Don't worry about dome temp at this point so long as it's not rising. 

    I don't know if you're familiar with APL's style, but the continued basting is where a lot of the magic happens as the fat in the base drips into the coals, vaporizes, and rises back up onto the meat.  


    Btw, the recipe wasn't written for a BGE so you can ignore the "cook with lid open" instructions.

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    Question about the rub: The instructions say to use prepared mustard, but the resulting mixture was very soupy and didn't adhere all that well to the tenderloin. Do you think they meant to use dry mustard?
    No, I literally use French's mustard sauce from the squeeze bottle. Did you shake your bottle good, to get any water that separated on top to mix in? The mustard should absolutely be thick when you squeeze it on, and it sticks like heck to the meat ... after that sprinkle on your spices, and you're good.


    If I recall correctly, you're not just slathering on mustard like you would a pork butt, but making a wet paste by mixing 1 part mustard with 1 part soy sauce and worchestire each. That should result in a fairly thin (soupy) "paste". 
    South of Nashville  -  BGE XL  -  Alfresco 42" ALXE  -  Alfresco Versa Burner  - Sunbeam Microwave 
  • Mark_B_GoodMark_B_Good Posts: 812
    SonVolt said:
    Archcam said:
    SonVolt said:
    This isn't a low 'n slow recipe per se... 40-60 minutes sound about right.  You're not cooking BBQ here, it's essentially a steak in roast form. 

    There's a lot of ways to cook a tenderloin, but this specific recipe has you searing direct first - so hot dome temp (400F-500F).   After getting a good sear, leave it DIRECT so the fat & baste drip directly into the coals, but start restricting air to slow the cook down. The tenderloin will continue to brown and take on a nice glaze as you baste. Don't worry about dome temp at this point so long as it's not rising. 

    I don't know if you're familiar with APL's style, but the continued basting is where a lot of the magic happens as the fat in the base drips into the coals, vaporizes, and rises back up onto the meat.  


    Btw, the recipe wasn't written for a BGE so you can ignore the "cook with lid open" instructions.

    Here's a bit of the butt end of my last cook using this recipe.


    Question about the rub: The instructions say to use prepared mustard, but the resulting mixture was very soupy and didn't adhere all that well to the tenderloin. Do you think they meant to use dry mustard?
    No, I literally use French's mustard sauce from the squeeze bottle. Did you shake your bottle good, to get any water that separated on top to mix in? The mustard should absolutely be thick when you squeeze it on, and it sticks like heck to the meat ... after that sprinkle on your spices, and you're good.


    If I recall correctly, you're not just slathering on mustard like you would a pork butt, but making a wet paste by mixing 1 part mustard with 1 part soy sauce and worchestire each. That should result in a fairly thin (soupy) "paste". 
    In all my tenderloin cooks, I just apply mustard and lather it on. They've ALWAYS come out amazing. Great bark, and then I drizzle on some honey just before serving, to counter the any savory that is left over by the mustard.
    Napoleon Prestige Pro 665, XL BGE, Lots of time for BBQ!
  • ArchcamArchcam Posts: 19
    OK, sounds like it should be a bit soupy. Perhaps it would've been a bit thicker had I mixed the Better Than Bouillon a bit more.  I doubt it'll ever get to paste consistency, though.
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