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Disaster strikes - can you help

Hi guys

Egg went out on a pork butt last night - looks like literally just after I fell asleep. Take a look at the smobot chart (pink line), you can see that internally it went up to about 160 before I lost the fire. Ignore the yellow - this is a second smaller butt that I'm going to toss because it didn't get high enough at all.

My question is can I save this now. I jumped up at 6am this morning and got the butt in the oven, relit the fire and I could continue with the cook but am unsure.

Many thanks



Comments

  • Ozzie_IsaacOzzie_Isaac Posts: 10,334
    edited September 13
    This is a hard one, but I personally would toss it.  It was above 135 for a number of hours so it has been pasturized.  I suspect no bacteria got on it or in it while it was still in the egg while cooling down.  So it may very well be safe.

    However, I always error on the conservative side and would toss it and move on.  It was below 135 for many hours.  I also am not a biologist and only know what I have read.
    If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing.

    XL, Medium, Minimax, Mini, Blackstone, WSM
  • Thanks Ozzie. It's for a lunch I'm hosting and I can't serve it without letting them know.

    I think I've reached a decision. I'm going to press on to get it to temperature but also get something else to feed them too. Full disclosure about the cook then let them decide. Haven't got time for another pulled pork though :(

    What a shame.
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 6,239
    Hi,

    Personally, I would continue the cook.

    The safety rules are very simplified, and are fairly rough guides.

    Here is a clearer explanation. Pathogen growth and death is determined by both time & temperature. At 140F, anything on the surface was dead in just a few seconds. But it started dying at around 126F. And it did not grow again until the meat surface temperature dropped back to that. If recontaminated, it takes about 4 hours to reach a hazardous level if the temp is around body temp, or just below.

    So the time the piece was back into hazard seems to be maybe 2 hours from what I can tell from the chart.

    The exception would be for meat that was previously cut into, like a de-boned buttm where the internal temp may not have gotten high enough, long enough, to destroy pathogens.

    Hope this helps




  • etherdomeetherdome Posts: 436
    No way. But that’s just me. 
    Upstate SC
    Large BGE
  • Man that sucks. I know it is too late now but smobot has a alarm function for pit temp variance, the white bell in the middle will get you there. Again sorry 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 15,996
    Do not risk it. Not worth it.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • WolfpackWolfpack Posts: 3,273
    If it was just me I would eat it and not think twice. Guests throw a wrench in that plan. You have time for a turbo butt and can save the day if you hurry. 
    Greensboro, NC
  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 7,298
    I'm with @gdenby, I'd continue the cook.

    Camped out in the (757/948/804)
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 15,996
    I would not risk it either.

    If I may share, and all of you Smobot owners, please take no offense, if it is working for you, that is awesome. I hope you get a lifetime of cooks with it.

    With a Smobot or any temp control unit, based on results I have had, and what has been shared by those in this forum and other forums for ceramic cooking; never go below 250°F to 275°F. The risk of losing your fire is too great, especially on overnight cooks, even when using a temp control unit.

    I tried using one for a while, and found that I could do as good if not better by using the vents and daisy wheel. (Old style vent cap). I think all of the temp controls are helpful, and they definitely have some cool bells and whistles. But the reliance and constant need to order probes became a bit of an issue for me. For whatever reason, I went through those rapidly. Another problem for me was the humidity, where we live, just seems to eat up the CPU. I tried encapsulation, double bagging, you name it, it still oxidized externally and internally within the first year. The only thing left that works on my Smobot, with any measure of reliability is the pit temp probe, and I have not used that in the last 50+ cooks.

    To be fair, I bought one of the earliest models, and when it worked, it was pretty dang cool. I am certain they have come a long way since my model, and I will also say the customer service was great, until they got tired of my calls and emails on the issues I had. I get it, maybe I just did everything wrong, or I got one that was not on par with all the others. There is only so much time to invest on one person with one unit. I may have used up my quota the first few months.

    225°F is a difficult temp to regulate, at least for me on the XL, but my success has gotten much better due to process changes along the way. I am just guessing I am 90% successful at 225°F with my XL, 95% at 230°-240°F 100% at 250° and above using the daisy wheel and bottom vent.

    There are those evenings I want to sit out by the fire pit, having a glass or two of wine, I will go for 225°F, mostly with no issues. I just check the temp whenever I need to stir the fire in my pit. It works out.

    Anyway, good luck moving forward.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 14,583
    edited September 13
    I have a 9-10 year old DigiQ DS2. Works fine, but I haven't used it since I discovered turbo a couple of years ago. Egg will hold 320° all day long, no crutch needed. Never used it for anything but butts and now, not even that.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!                                                                                                                                                                                                                           

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • Love the smobot for the simple reason that I can throw some protein on the grill and control the egg remotely. I can monitor cook and turn the heat up to insure a timely finish all remotely. Also really like the alarm function I can go to bed knowing that if something goes wrong my cell phone alarm will wake me up. 
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • I have also had probe problems and inconsistencies with functioning accurate probes.
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • Ozzie_IsaacOzzie_Isaac Posts: 10,334
    edited September 13
    I have a Flameboss 100, FB200, and a Smobot.  They each have their quirks.  I have successfully done 225, but I find at that low temp, I am better off doing it manually.  235-285 is the sweet spot for me.

    I put ceramic shields between the probes and the fire, so no part of the cable is exposed to direct radiant heat.  I have also used aluminum foil with success.  My final adjustment was a groove in my gasket for the wires to rest in.  After these changes I stopped ruining probes.  I still keep a set on hand in case.

    For FB, I leave the top vent open about the thickness of a penny.  I aim to keep the fan running around 30% of the time.  Once that happens I know I am good to leave it untended. (I use a Smokeware cap)

    For the Smobot, I open the bottom vent about half-way and just let the Smobot do its thing.  I have only had one weird experience with the Smobot in all the years of use.  Still not sure what happened.  I have used and abused the Smobot and tried all sorts of low and high temps.

    I grab what is handy for most cooks.  Sometimes the Smobot, sometimes the FB, sometimes nothing.  I use controllers during they day too if I am running errands or taking the kids places.  I use it for monitoring while I am out and about.
    If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing.

    XL, Medium, Minimax, Mini, Blackstone, WSM
  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 13,203
    I have yet to have this problem with a fan driven unit. As stated above, you just can’t trust really low temps with draft alone. If you are using these types of control mechanisms, I also recommend 250-275 Low end range. 
  • briwaldbriwald Posts: 26
    I would probably save it, my wife would insist on pitching it.  

    Regarding these temperature control devices, has anyone tried the Egg Genius?  I've only been Egging for about a year, but have been thinking of getting one. 
    Maitland, FL
    XL BGE since 2019
    "When cooking, I stick to the 3 B's: Beer, Bacon and Butter." 
  • 4TheGrillOfIt4TheGrillOfIt Posts: 52
    edited September 13
    briwald said:
    I would probably save it, my wife would insist on pitching it.  

    Regarding these temperature control devices, has anyone tried the Egg Genius?  I've only been Egging for about a year, but have been thinking of getting one. 
    Yes, I love the Egg Genius.  It’s easy to setup and the App is easy to use.   Being fan based it seems to have no problem maintaining lower temps.  You can also set temperature alarm thresholds for the pit and you’ll receive a phone notification if the pit hits those thresholds.  
    Large BGE, Small BGE, Weber Summit NG                                                                                               
    Memphis  
  • How did it go?  I would have run to a nearby bbq joint and bought a few pounds and humbly owned up to the mishap.

    Not being able to go under 250 to me is another reason to avoid the auto blower bbq cpaps.  Do you think you had a good lump setup?  To me a good 230 all-nighter means ensuring the firebox holes are clear of ash and the lump was a “clean start” with big pieces on the bottom, smaller as you go up. 


  • How good of friends are your guests?
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 14,370
    I am far more blasé about testing the limits of my own intestinal fortitude, less so when caliqueen, kids, guests are in the mix. 

    I’d likely have  soldiered on, and eaten it all... While cooking something else for the guests. 

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 33,584
    Eat!
    ______________________________________________
    This is my signature line just so you're not confused.  Love me or hate me, I am forum Marmite.
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, smoker with a 5k btu AC, gas grill, fire pit, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 

  • DondgcDondgc Posts: 614
    @balliardi - what was your final decision?
    New Orleans LA
  • rconercone Posts: 195
    I would eat it, but I would not serve it to other people. 
    "Feed me, or feed me to something; I just want to be part of the food chain" Al Bundy

    LBGE, SBGE, Carson Rotisserie, Blackstone Griddle  

    Milwaukee, Wisconsin 
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 26,380
    pit temp did not go below 140 until after 230 am and you got it into a hot oven in 3 1/2 hours. bone in and i would eat it, boneless i might be more hesitant but would still eat it. back in the 220 dome temp days no butt was over 140 internal at 8 hours in and no one was getting sick
  • Ozzie_IsaacOzzie_Isaac Posts: 10,334
    pit temp did not go below 140 until after 230 am and you got it into a hot oven in 3 1/2 hours. bone in and i would eat it, boneless i might be more hesitant but would still eat it. back in the 220 dome temp days no butt was over 140 internal at 8 hours in and no one was getting sick
    Stronger constitution back then.

    @Little Steven would have put it in his luggage and finished it when he arrived at his destination.
    If it is worth doing, it is worth overdoing.

    XL, Medium, Minimax, Mini, Blackstone, WSM
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