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Sourdough weekend

thanks to @caliking for sharing the spawn of Maximus starter, this weekend we have done sourdough pizza last night and bread making today.   


Mankato, MN - LBGE

Comments

  • bluebird66bluebird66 Posts: 2,292
    Wow, that looks good!
    Large Egg with adjustable rig, Kick Ash Basket and various Weber's
    Floyd Va

  • calikingcaliking Posts: 12,467
    Nice!

    Glad I could help. Any problems reviving the dehydrated starter?

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 128
    caliking said:
    Nice!

    Glad I could help. Any problems reviving the dehydrated starter?
    worked perfectly with the instructions you sent.  I was able to save some too to pass it forward.  
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • Grader07Grader07 Posts: 220
    I see a future egger in the picture!!!  😁
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    I have yeast breads down great but I’m having a hard time getting a good proof on sourdough. My starter is about 3 weeks old and doubles in 8-12 hours 
    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 12,467
    GlennM said:
    I have yeast breads down great but I’m having a hard time getting a good proof on sourdough. My starter is about 3 weeks old and doubles in 8-12 hours 
    its a long read, but I steer you towards the Wild Yeast thread . All kinds of great info there.

    If you're having trouble with the proofing stage, a simple test is to poke the dough with a floured finger. If the dimple you make springs back readily, its under proofed. If it doesn't really spring back, its over proofed. If it fills back in after a few secs, then its goldilocks!

    Another way to gauge this after the fact, is to look at the transverse section of the cut loaf. If the sides make a less than acute angle with the bottom, and the loaf is somewhat dense, then it was likely under proofed. If the sides make a greater than acute/ large angle then it was probably over proofed. Should still be tasty bread though :)   

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,421
    @glennm how's the temp in your house?  ours is 63-65 and it makes for looooongn rise times.  an extra 10-15 degrees makes a huge difference

    op, awesome looking loaf!  and pizza on the egg is a winner.
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    I’m in I’m in Florida right now and have tried on the counter, in the oven with the light on, overnight in the fridge, etc. I don’t get a great rise from it either at the initial or second proof. It is also crazy sticky, like the hydration is way to high. I usually use 75% with yeast and it’s fine 
    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 128
    GlennM said:
    I’m in I’m in Florida right now and have tried on the counter, in the oven with the light on, overnight in the fridge, etc. I don’t get a great rise from it either at the initial or second proof. It is also crazy sticky, like the hydration is way to high. I usually use 75% with yeast and it’s fine 
    Have you read Ken Forkish's book?  He lays out bread making in an easy to read manner and talks about variations with water temp, room temp, etc. 
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    No, I haven’t. I get great results with yeast, proof to 2 or 3 times the size in 6 hrs. One hour in the bannaton and the I get a great loaf. 
    With sourdough I get very little rise, maybe 40% and nothing after I form it. It is really sticky as well, I must be doing something wrong

    here is are some examples of yeast bread


    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,421
    @GlennM try cutting back the hydration to 63%
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    I had some luck by changing the hydration to 65%. This is a bit dense but I was able to get it to rise this time. I did about a 6 hr bulk proof, formed the boule, left it out for an hour and then into the fridge overnight. Took it out of The fridge and waited until it passed the finger poke test. It took about four hours for that to happen.


    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • 20stone20stone Posts: 1,735
    Congrats on diving into sourbugs. We have had a hand in the lineage of your starter and love to see the spawn aspawning. 

    One of my spawn also has some of our goo spawn and follows a different process than I do, but also w great results. 

    The key thing I took from the Forkish book is that the rise really has several components, and you can play w your proofing process by altering each of them:
    - how vigorous your starter is
    - how much levain you use in your dough
    - temp of the dough when you start (altered by water temp)
    - temp of where you proof
    - time

    75% is a very normal hydration level, and I would try to play with your process at that and tweak other things first. 

    Have fjn!
    (now only 16 stone)

    Joule SV
    GE induction stove
    Gasser by the community pool
    Scale (which one of my friends refuses to use)
    Friends with BGEs and myriad other fired devices
    Charcuterie and sourdough enthusiast
    Prosciuttos in an undisclosed location

    Austin, TX
  • NPHuskerFLNPHuskerFL Posts: 17,442
    Nice work!  I love working with sourdough.
    LBGE 2013 & MM 2014
    Die Hard HUSKER & BRONCO FAN
    Flying Low & Slow in "Da Burg" FL
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,421
    my very novice take on it is that as hydration increases, you have less gluten trying to support more weight.  so starter activity and gluten development become more critical.  sprinkle in just a small amount of commercial yeast when you're putting the bread together and wow what a difference.  

    there's a lot of good talk about this over on the fresh loaf board  http://www.thefreshloaf.com/, or take a look at this guy's stuff.  http://www.breadwerx.com/ 
      


    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    edited March 15
    75% hydration with sourdough was a failure for me, 65% worked well, I will start moving it up a couple % at a time and see how it goes. I would rather not add yeast if I can get this down.  I can deal with over 80% hydration with yeast :-0
    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 3,774
    The loaf I posted in wild yeast earlier today was 77% hydration. I use 20% starter while we are still having cool weather. As stated earlier, gluten development is important. 
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven.
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 128
    20stone said:
    Congrats on diving into sourbugs. We have had a hand in the lineage of your starter and love to see the spawn aspawning. 

    One of my spawn also has some of our goo spawn and follows a different process than I do, but also w great results. 

    The key thing I took from the Forkish book is that the rise really has several components, and you can play w your proofing process by altering each of them:
    - how vigorous your starter is
    - how much levain you use in your dough
    - temp of the dough when you start (altered by water temp)
    - temp of where you proof
    - time

    75% is a very normal hydration level, and I would try to play with your process at that and tweak other things first. 

    Have fjn!
    Why does forkish write his recipes for so much levain creation?   Seems wasteful to make a bunch to use a small part with the final dough.  
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    SciAggie said:
    The loaf I posted in wild yeast earlier today was 77% hydration. I use 20% starter while we are still having cool weather. As stated earlier, gluten development is important. 
    So I’m assumming that would be

    450 g flour
    335 g water
    100 g starter (100% hydration)
    10.5 g salt

    thats 77% hydration
    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • SciAggieSciAggie Posts: 3,774
    GlennM said:
    SciAggie said:
    The loaf I posted in wild yeast earlier today was 77% hydration. I use 20% starter while we are still having cool weather. As stated earlier, gluten development is important. 
    So I’m assumming that would be

    450 g flour
    335 g water
    100 g starter (100% hydration)
    10.5 g salt

    thats 77% hydration
    Yes sir. 
    Coleman, Texas
    Large BGE & Mini Max for the wok. A few old camp Dutch ovens and a wood fired oven.
    "Bourbon slushies. Sure you can cook on the BGE without them, but why would you?"
                                                                                                                          YukonRon
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 128


    Overnight country blonde recipe from the forkish book.  
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • GlennMGlennM Posts: 959
    Baguettes at 68% hydration. It is surprising how differently the sourdough behaves compared to yeast bread 


    In the bush just East of Cambridge,Ontario 
  • 20stone20stone Posts: 1,735
    Hoster05 said:

    Why does forkish write his recipes for so much levain creation?   Seems wasteful to make a bunch to use a small part with the final dough.  
    I have no idea, but the first time I made one of his recipes, I saw how that was going and was "Aw, helllll no."  It turns out that if I want 300g of levain, I can measure 100g of starter, 100g of flour and 100g of water pretty well, and then I can just scrape it out of the tub into the autolyze.  I have not found any ill effects from doing this like a rational human being.
    (now only 16 stone)

    Joule SV
    GE induction stove
    Gasser by the community pool
    Scale (which one of my friends refuses to use)
    Friends with BGEs and myriad other fired devices
    Charcuterie and sourdough enthusiast
    Prosciuttos in an undisclosed location

    Austin, TX
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