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Burning pizza...help!

I'm not sure what im doing wrong.  Setting up egg with diffuser plates and putting stone on the grate. Running at bout 550-600 and after just a few mins the bottom is burnt..black burnt and the top is just right. So I put in a taller rack and same thing happened. What am I doing wrong? Help before my wife kills me!

Comments

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 8,991
    Tell us more about your pizza. Making your own dough? Sugar in it?
    Try platesetter legs down and use another spacer on the platesetter with your pizza stone on top.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • dmouratidmourati Posts: 462
    You need two layers of deflector. One for the pie and one underneath that separated by an air gap.
    Mountain View, CA
  • fishindocfishindoc Posts: 212
    Dough is homemade..with 1 tbsp sugar. Using heat deflector and another rack...bout 4 inches tall. Stone on top of that. Bottom got black before the rest of the crust was done...it was still doughy a little
  • I have better luck with temps at 450 and parchment paper under crust for first 10 minutes or so.  And my stone is 3” above felt line so toppings get done and cheese is golden brown.

    Land of OZ-Hays Kansas

    BGE XL++Flameboss 300 WiFi++Blackstone 36"++2 Weber Kettles

  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 18,815
    Your sugar content at that temp will result in a burned crust.  But barely.  Stick with your tallest “rack” and use a dough with little or no sugar.  Alternatively stay high in the dome and cook around 500.
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • I have been experimenting with temp and stone position for a while. Tonight I had the plate setter feet down with my PS Woo upside down with the stone on that. This put the stone about 3” above belt line. I use a home made crust using 00 flour and very little sugar. Tonight I cooked it at 475 for about 20 minutes.  The crust and the toppings were done perfect. I tend to load our pizza’s pretty heavy so it needs a bit more time to get the toppings done.
    Ontario, Canada
    XL- BGE
    CGS- AR, spider, PS WOO, 
    KAB
  • fishindocfishindoc Posts: 212
    Sounds like I should turn the heat down a bit
  • I started out cooking at 600 and found the crust finished way to fast. As mentioned we load it up with 3-4 meats, peppers, onions, mushrooms...etc.
    I was having a bit of a challenge getting the pizza to slide off the peel. I now put a short piece of tinfoil under the leading edge to help drag it off the peel. The corn meal sometimes doesn’t let it slide off on its own. Our pizzas are usually around 16”.
    Ontario, Canada
    XL- BGE
    CGS- AR, spider, PS WOO, 
    KAB
  • ColbyLangColbyLang Posts: 110
    Eliminate the sugar
  • SlippySlippy Posts: 177
    Do you put a bunch of flour on the stone? I have made that mistake before... The flour burns and funks up the whole crust... 
    Rockwall, TX  •  LBGE, Big Hat Ranger offset smoker, Really old 22" Weber Kettle, Pile of Pecan and Post Oak... 
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 120
    Too. UCB sugar in the dough and no air gap between platsetter and pizza stone.  Go plate setter legs down, 2 bricks then pizza stone on top of that.  I run that setup between 600-650 degrees for all my pies.
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 120
    Hoster05 said:
    Too. UCB sugar in the dough and no air gap between platsetter and pizza stone.  Go plate setter legs down, 2 bricks then pizza stone on top of that.  I run that setup between 600-650 degrees for all my pies.
    Too much^*.  Not enough coffee yet today. 
    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • I like to get the egg crazy hot but the right temp needed to broil the top will burn the bottom no matter how much you move it around. 

    The solution i found is to take an old dish rag in a water bowl and wipe down the stone to cool it off some right before putting the pizza on the stone 

    works like a charm 

    Large BGE 2013, Minimax 2018 
    Instagram: @smokingdadbbq  Collection of my best BGE foodporn shots 
  • fishindocfishindoc Posts: 212
    I'm wondering....could I put the stone on just a few mins before I cook them or will that crack it?
  • fishindocfishindoc Posts: 212
    Hoster05 said:
    Hoster05 said:
    Too. UCB sugar in the dough and no air gap between platsetter and pizza stone.  Go plate setter legs down, 2 bricks then pizza stone on top of that.  I run that setup between 600-650 degrees for all my pies.
    Too much^*.  Not enough coffee yet today. If I'm using parchment paper and homemade dough...can I still get air under it?
  • dmouratidmourati Posts: 462
    fishindoc said:
    I'm wondering....could I put the stone on just a few mins before I cook them or will that crack it?
    No, but you could split the difference and only leave it on for half the time before it is fully saturated with the heat. Say 30 minutes. The problem is this only works if you are cooking a single pie.
    Mountain View, CA
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,355
    fishindoc said:
    I'm wondering....could I put the stone on just a few mins before I cook them or will that crack it?
    You could, but there is no way to ever get a stable situation that way.  You would need to hit the exact time the stone is warming up to the temp you need. This will vary from cook to cook, so you will sometimes get good results and sometimes not. Cooking more than one pizza this way doesn't work too well.  You really need to find the proper balance in a steady temp situation for repeatability and consistency.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • StillH2OEggerStillH2OEgger Posts: 2,227
    I'll defer to the experts on here, but the keys for me as a novice have been shooting for around 500 degrees, especially with a little heavier topped pizza and a normal crust. This also lets me use parchment paper (you can remove halfway through), which I think allows for the easiest transfer without using cornmeal, which I don't care for, or something else to make handling it easier. Also, let the BGE temp settle in longer than you think you need in order to get the radiant heat you need coming from the dome so the top of the pizza will finish before the crust burns.
    Stillwater, MN
  • CanuggheadCanugghead Posts: 6,465
    A tip I learned but never tried ... if crust is almost done but top is still raw, insert a perforated pizza pan under the pie to buy more time for top to cook.
    canuckland
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 10,155
    Yeah I think the easiest step would be to just turn the heat down. Another thing you can try is using a pizza screen or pizza pan. You can start  cooking with a screen or pan then slide the pie on to the stone if needed to crisp up the bottom.


    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,355
    ... Also, let the BGE temp settle in longer than you think you need in order to get the radiant heat you need coming from the dome so the top of the pizza will finish before the crust burns.
    @fishindoc  you didn't give use a lot of detail on your setup but too short of a warm up will get you the results you are seeing.  The stone will warm up faster than the dome.  The balance you need to achieve is getting enough conductive heat from the pizza stone to cook the dough in the same time the toppings are cooked by convective heat and radiant heat from the dome.  The radiant heat component is often overlooked.  It take a while for the ceramics to heat up.  A general recommendation is to give the egg an hour to get thoroughly stable temps.

    It also sounds like you are making your pizza with a heavy topping load.  Lower temps are needed when loading up the toppings. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • paqmanpaqman Posts: 2,815
    Lowering the temperature is probably the answer here.  You have to use the temperature for the dough recipe that you are using.

    A pizza dough made with Italian Typo 00 flour, water, salt and yeast (no sugar, no oil) will call for a higher baking temperature. (600F+)

    A pizza dough made with regular AP or bread flour, water, salt, sugar, oil and yeast will call for a lower baking temperature (arround 425F)


    ____________________
    Entrepreneurs are simply those who understand that there is little difference between obstacle and opportunity and are able to turn both to their advantage. •Niccolo Machiavelli
  • jbreedjbreed Posts: 98
    I live at 6,250ft elevation, had to figure out a few things.  We cook 18in pies and load them with all sorts of stuff.  Usually do 4-5 18inchers at a time, and it's a party.  I have an XL and set up with spider upside down, stone on top so the pizza cooks about an inch or two above the felt line.  

    My approach, I use pizza screens and it provides a great air layer that works perfect https://www.amazon.com/New-Star-Foodservice-50684-Commercial/dp/B00EAXVVCY/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1549833390&sr=8-1&keywords=pizza+grate

    cook at 475 +/- 50. put the pizza on for 3 mins, turn 180 degrees for another 3 mins.  done.

    I found the pizza screens also make it super easy to create symetry, move on/off and cut.
    Castle Rock, CO - always a Husker
  • Otis04Otis04 Posts: 3
    Are you using cornmeal under the pizza?  It has enough sugar to burn. Try semolina flour instead. A little grainy like cornmeal but won’t burn
  • Hoster05Hoster05 Posts: 120
    fishindoc said:
    Hoster05 said:
    Hoster05 said:
    Too. UCB sugar in the dough and no air gap between platsetter and pizza stone.  Go plate setter legs down, 2 bricks then pizza stone on top of that.  I run that setup between 600-650 degrees for all my pies.
    Too much^*.  Not enough coffee yet today. If I'm using parchment paper and homemade dough...can I still get air under it?
    see photo below, my platesetter has two bricks placed on top of it, then the pizza stone on top of the bricks.  I make my pizzas on parchment paper, place them on the stone for 2 min or so then use my pizza peel to lift the pie and remove the paper.  


    Mankato, MN - LBGE
  • ChokeOnSmokeChokeOnSmoke Posts: 1,936
    The amount of water in your dough makes all the difference.  Just up the water content if you want to cook hotter without burning the bottom.   Of course this is easier said than done, you'll still need to figure out air temp, plate temp, dough water content combination.  Lots of trial and error.
    Another thing I learned over the years, no need for parchment paper, semolina or cornmeal.  If you preheat your stone, it's not going to stick.  I've done sloppy wet dough and super high heat and it doesn't stick.  It might stick to your peel though!  Flour the peel and keep shaking it regularly while assembling your toppings for no stick, then quickly slide it onto your preheated stone.
    Packerland, Wisconsin

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 24,531
    setup looks good. im not concerned with sugar content.  biggest thing starting out is getting the dough stretched properly and to the right thickness,  using way less sauce than you think, and not overdoing the toppings. think 350 for thick heavy pies, 550 for a new york style regular thickness, and 900 for the really thin crusts
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