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BBQ rubs

I was just wondering if anyone has any thoughts about rubs and how much of a difference they really make. I’ve done some searches on here and think I got a good idea of what the majority of people use. Just didn’t know if it was more due to convenience or what. I’ve always made my own. Kinda a blackening season that I use for a lot of different cooks. It I want to use as a bbq rub I just add brown sugar and more salt. Was thinking about trying out a few store bought rubs like dizzy pig to see if it makes a big difference but would love to get a few others thoughts 

Comments

  • Salt, pepper, garlic, paprika and cyan (plus celery if you like a more pronounced smoke ring)
    Large BGE 2013, Minimax 2018 
    Instagram: @smokingdadbbq  Collection of my best BGE foodporn shots 
  • dmouratidmourati Posts: 493
    To me the rub is part of the fun of cooking. It lets me put a flavor profile on whatever protein I'm cooking. have a bunch of Dizzy Pig rubs.

    For pork butt, I use a rub from my butcher called old diggins. 

    https://www.amazon.com/Belcampo-Meat-Diggings-District-Organic/dp/B01MQM4RTQ

    For BBQ chicken, I like to use http://www.therubco.com/ BBQ

    Dizzy Dust is a nice all purpose rub for me. I use it when I don't have a better idea.

    I've used Swamp Venom on chicken, tuna, and shrimp:

    https://dizzypigbbq.com/product/swamp-venom/

    Dizzy Pig also makes a Jerk seasoning that is nice on chicken:

    https://dizzypigbbq.com/product/jamaican-firewalk/


    Mountain View, CA
  • JstrokeJstroke Posts: 2,296
    After going down this rabbit hole with both DIY and commercial, I am primarily back to good old Kosher Salt and Black Pepper for 80-90%. I use other spices for marinades etc. For me at least I don't like sugar/sweet even on ribs or in sauce so most commercial sauce and rubs don't work.
    Columbus, Ohio--A Gasser filled with Matchlight and an Ugly Drum.
  • WoodchunkWoodchunk Posts: 911
    Our go to bbq rub is Weber kc bbq rub
  • YEMTreyYEMTrey Posts: 6,476
    I like to try different rubs and profiles.  The only rub that I keep on hand at all times is Meat Church Holy Cow.  Use it the most.
    Steve 
    XL, Mini Max, and a 22" Blackstone in Cincinnati, Ohio

  • Mdames501Mdames501 Posts: 17

    This is what I keep mixed up. It doesn’t have much salt cause I like to see exactly how much salt I’m using so I had that separate. Same with brown sugar. The ratios could probably be mixed up some to make better but it works for me. 

    3 tbsp sweet paprika 

    1 tbsp chili powder

    1 tbsp garlic powder

    1/2 tbsp chipotle 

    1/2 tbsp onion powder

    1/2 tbsp kosher salt

    1/2 tbsp coriander 

    1/2 tbsp black pepper 

    1/2 tbsp oregano 

    1/2 tsp turmeric 

    1/2 tsp cayenne 


  • GATravellerGATraveller Posts: 6,871
    Lane's BBQ makes some killer rubs. Their Kapalua is the best seasoning I've found for salmon. 

    "Social media gives legions of idiots the right to speak when they once only spoke at a bar after a glass of wine, without harming the community [...] but now they have the same right to speak as a Nobel Prize winner. It's the invasion of the idiots."

                                                                                  -Umberto Eco

    2 Large
    Peachtree Corners, GA
  • I've gone both routes but prefer to make my own. I sometimes just go GSP and I keep Holy Cow and Dizzy Pig on hand for those times I don't have the time or energy to make up a rub.

    I used this on my brisket this week:

    Paprika 1 cup

    Garlic Powder 8 tbsp

    Onion Powder 8 tbsp

    Dried Oregano 5 tbsp

    Kosher Salt 5 tbsp

    Black Pepper 2 tbsp

    Cayenne 2 tbsp

    I do something similar for pork but add some brown sugar and onion flakes.

    I think developing you own rubs and sauces is part of the fun. Last weekend for the ribs I just dumped all of the partial bottles of BBQ sauce in the fridge into a pot and brought it to a simmer. Not bad but I do want to develop my own sweet bbq sauce as well as a mustard based sauce.


    Marshall in Beautiful Fruit Cove, FL.
    MiniMax 04/17
    Unofficial BGE MiniMax Evangelist
    Facebook Big Green Egg MiniMax Owners Group


  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 6,190
    Good rubs can make a huge difference. Lots of people here like rubs w. coffee added. I do too, but the flavor to me is so strong, I don't use it very often. Walkerwood's Jerk is amazing, but some of the pork I've served folks w. it on has been too strong for their liking.

    Most pre-made rubs do center around SPOG, but also, and too often, a bunch of flavor faded herbs and spices. DP is notable because they make an effort to only have reasonably fresh blends available, and each one has a distinct flavor profile.

    I've had good pre-made rubs from a number of sources. The 2 branches of the family that operate Penzeys/Spice House have a rib rub that is much the same except for the name. One calls it Galena Street, the other, Bronzeville. It really is a distinct Chicago-style 'Q flavor. I've also enjoyed some of John Henry's a lot. The problem is that unless you are doing a lot of cooking, they are likely to fade before used up.

    Shipping would be a limiting factor, but I've had better results buying sample bags that get opened and used for a single meal. Here's an idea. "Keurig" cups of vacuum sealed rubs.

  • I don’t like store bought as I inevitably run out mid prep since I forgot to order more from my previous cook when it occurred to me that I should order more. 

    Knowing how to mix a blend you like for the type of protein you’re making is handy. 
    Large BGE 2013, Minimax 2018 
    Instagram: @smokingdadbbq  Collection of my best BGE foodporn shots 
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 9,722
    When you buy or make rubs, pay attention to how it tastes on your plate, not just as you are putting it on. Lots of rubs sound and smell great out of the bottle but end up being so muted after the cook you may as well be using a simpler rub.
    Austin, TX
  • GoldenQGoldenQ Posts: 403
    I mostly use black pepper/salt/dizzy pig shakin the tree unless it is fish or shrimp.  for salmon I always use a rub and think it makes a large difference also for grilling shrimp
    I XL  and 1 Weber Kettle  And 1 Weber Q220       Outside Alvin, TX-- South of Houston
  • GulfcoastguyGulfcoastguy Posts: 2,322
    I switch it up for variety. Currently I have a surplus of good rubs to go through but I have made Mickey's coffee rub also.
  • Mdames501Mdames501 Posts: 17
    I've gone both routes but prefer to make my own. I sometimes just go GSP and I keep Holy Cow and Dizzy Pig on hand for those times I don't have the time or energy to make up a rub.

    I used this on my brisket this week:

    Paprika 1 cup

    Garlic Powder 8 tbsp

    Onion Powder 8 tbsp

    Dried Oregano 5 tbsp

    Kosher Salt 5 tbsp

    Black Pepper 2 tbsp

    Cayenne 2 tbsp

    I do something similar for pork but add some brown sugar and onion flakes.

    I think developing you own rubs and sauces is part of the fun. Last weekend for the ribs I just dumped all of the partial bottles of BBQ sauce in the fridge into a pot and brought it to a simmer. Not bad but I do want to develop my own sweet bbq sauce as well as a mustard based sauce.


    I haven’t got to deep in making traditional sauces. I’ve always liked dry ribs or with a little honey or something to glaze at the end. Lately I’ve been more in to wet ribs and have been using Stubbs mixed with a little sweet baby rays. In the summmer time I do like using peach preserves with a little sweet baby rays as a sauce. 
  • Mdames501 said:
    I've gone both routes but prefer to make my own. I sometimes just go GSP and I keep Holy Cow and Dizzy Pig on hand for those times I don't have the time or energy to make up a rub.

    I used this on my brisket this week:

    Paprika 1 cup

    Garlic Powder 8 tbsp

    Onion Powder 8 tbsp

    Dried Oregano 5 tbsp

    Kosher Salt 5 tbsp

    Black Pepper 2 tbsp

    Cayenne 2 tbsp

    I do something similar for pork but add some brown sugar and onion flakes.

    I think developing you own rubs and sauces is part of the fun. Last weekend for the ribs I just dumped all of the partial bottles of BBQ sauce in the fridge into a pot and brought it to a simmer. Not bad but I do want to develop my own sweet bbq sauce as well as a mustard based sauce.


    I haven’t got to deep in making traditional sauces. I’ve always liked dry ribs or with a little honey or something to glaze at the end. Lately I’ve been more in to wet ribs and have been using Stubbs mixed with a little sweet baby rays. In the summmer time I do like using peach preserves with a little sweet baby rays as a sauce. 
    I do my ribs 2-1-1 with the second stage wrapped in aluminum foil with brown sugar, butter and a drizzle of honey. 

    I like Sweet baby Rays as well as Blues Hog but I haven't tried Stubbs yet. I also like mustard based sauces on pork.
    Marshall in Beautiful Fruit Cove, FL.
    MiniMax 04/17
    Unofficial BGE MiniMax Evangelist
    Facebook Big Green Egg MiniMax Owners Group


  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,498
    edited January 13
    I agree with those who've said that rubs (and sauces) can make a huge difference, and that it depends a lot on what you're cooking how much difference a rub will make, and which rub.  I think it's fun to make your own, and I've made several, and they've been as different from each other as night and day, and different ones are best for different things.

    I also like Dizzy Pig's blends, though I use them less than I used to.  I often prefer just salt and pepper for burgers and steaks, but sometimes I really love DP Cow Lick for those.  I think DP's Jamaican Firewalk is a terrific jerk rub, and I use it for lots of stuff, including indoor cooking <gasp>.  One of my and my wife's favorite quick and easy meals is skinless, boneless chicken breasts with a rub, browned in a skillet, then very slowly braised, covered, with a little liquid (white wine, or cider, even water and some preserves, etc.), and Jamaican Firewalk is one of my favorites for that.  I also like Swamp Venom a lot, and several other ones, but those are my favorites.

    A few recipes for rubs that I've tried that are probably different from anything you've had before:
    • "Tuscan-Style" ribs:  These were pork ribs with an Italian-style herb and spice mixture that wound up wholly unlike any "barbecue" ribs I've ever had.  I love regular BBQ-style ribs, so I don't make these all the time, but they were a really nice change, and just delicious.
    • Fennel-pepper-chile Rub: This was also really, really different than any typical BBQ or grilling rub I've ever had, fennel seeds, dried chile, and black pepper, all toasted in a skillet and then ground.  From an award-winning chef, and really, really good (if you like fennel, anyway -- some people don't).
    • South African Braai Rub: I think "braai" is just the South African word for BBQ or grill, and this was again quite different than any rub I've had, and really good.
    • Bourbon-Glazed Ribs: I think these are my favorite pork ribs that I've ever had!  It's from Smoke & Spice, a well-known cookbook for low-and-slow BBQ, here, and it has a rub and a bourbon-laced sauce at the end, and these are GOOD!  If you look farther down on the page, someone else posted the recipe.
    • Sweet and Spicy Chicken Breasts: This is my wife's all-time favorite chicken recipe, and it's really good.  Again, very unusual -- I've never tasted any other rub like it.  The main flavors are mostly coriander and brown sugar, and man, it's good!
  • Bama_ManBama_Man Posts: 4
    I love the Gospel for brisket  and the Honey Hog on butts. Both are Meat Church. 
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,288








    here ia one I have used for15+years given to me by a pit master of 40 years nd many nQ joints Rub, Jimmy Joe"s  "BBQ-PIT-MASTER", Alabama B-B-Q Rub

    INGREDIENTS:
    1 Cup Smoked Paprika
    1/4 Cup Mustard Powder, preferably Colemans
    3/4 Cup Fine Sea Salt, I used my Rainbow salt blend
    1/2 Cup Black Pepper, Fine ground
    1/4 Cup Cayenne or Fine Red Pepper, to taste heat
    1/4 Cup Garlic Powder
    1/4 Cup Onion Powder

    PROCEDURE:

    1. Mix all and place in a sealed container.  Will last for several months if not used up first.

    Recipe Type: Barbecue, Rub/Seasoning/Spice

    Source
    Source: Jake & Charlies BBQ, Jimmy Brooks, "BBQ-PIT MASTER", 2014/06/25

    Author Notes
    12/04/1916:  Little celery salt.

    Yukon Ron  EggHead Forum
        1/2 cup light brown sugar
        1/2 cup turbinado sugar
        2 tablespoon Kosher salt
        2 tablespoons celery salt
        2 tablespoons seasoned salt
        4 teaspoons smoked paprika
        2 teaspoons ground black pepper
        2 teaspoons chipotle powder
        2 teaspoons granulated garlic
        2 teaspoons chili powder
        1 teaspoon white pepper
        1 teaspoon onion powder
        1 teaspoon mustard powder



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