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Best lump charcoal?

1356

Comments

  • Still have bags AO left for special cooks. Rockwood our go to. Royal Oak red used for hot fast cooks and for cleaning the egg
    Large, small and mini now Egging in Rowlett Tx
  • Tspud1Tspud1 Posts: 1,295
    SonVolt said:
    Tspud1 said:
    SonVolt said:
    Yep. 
    One I make

    Wait, you make salamanders?
    and other things
  • bubbajackbubbajack Posts: 727
    I will say this, I am done with royal oak. Only use it when I am in a bind but the last couple bags I have bought have ruined some really good food. Heavy smoke, nasty taste, almost like lighter fluid. Ruined the taste of some nice rib-eyes and gulf shrimp last night, hell even my sweet taters sucked. Put the whole bag in the fire pit. Pi$$ed.
    I drink cheap beer so I can afford good bourbon.

    Salisbury, NC...... XL,L,Mx2,S, MM, Mini BGE, FireDisc x2
  • I've used about everything available to me here in SW Ohio and even mail ordered Rockwood and Fogo. My thoughts for what its worth; Rockwood is good stuff but I have to drive 30 miles and pay $28 a bag or mail order it and still pay to much for it. Fogo is my go to for low and slows but they have priced themselves out of a customer. 35 lb bags are worth $40 or less to me but not the $50 that they charge now. Cowboy is pure junk, used once and felt ripped off even being the cheapest. We have in our area an open to the public restaurant supply store called GFS or Gorden Food Service. They have a house brand that is repackaged Royal Oak. Burns good, little dust and for I think its $15 for a 20# bag.

    So just buy whats in your area, evaluate it for your self and enjoy. Good lump under a buck a pound is fair imho. Bad lump is not worth the bag it comes in. For hot cooks you don't need the best of the best. For low and slow its important that your lump burns consistently and slowly. So if you have the room, stock up on different brands and use what works best for your meal your cooking.

    Don't over think it and just enjoy the experience of the egg.  
  • yljktyljkt Posts: 799
    It is friday night...Cowboy or Frontier is the way to go!  =)
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 35,834
    Poorly carbonized mesquite lump rules all others!!!  EFF EVERYTHING ELSE!!!
    ______________________________________________
    Large and Medium BGE, Kamado Joe Jr, Akorn Jr, big effin' pellet smoker, gas grill, fire pit, FireDisk, pack of angry cats, two turntables and a microphone, my friend.  Registered republican.
    New Orleans, LA - we know how to eat 
    Stike's troll account



  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 16,849
    I prefer pine cones 
  • When i do big cooks, I can save money by using these

    Image result for pile of burning car tires
     plus, you don't have to use expensive smoking woods.... problem solved, thank you.
    Chicago, IL BGE XL BGE Mini Webber Charcoal / Elmhurst, IL
  • I know everyone has their opinion about lump. Here is mine:

    You can get away with cheaper lump(typically smaller pieces) for hotter cooks but you burn through it faster. You can use a more expensive lump for long low and slow cooks such as FOGO or KJ Big Block because it has larger pieces and burns longer. I burn B&B for regular grilling style cooks because it’s affordable and typically clean. I burn FOGO when smoking because we like the flavor and it lasts due to the biggest chunks in the industry.  I offer my FOGO referral code when appropriate and usually get a bag or two for free each year to offset the cost. 

    I like Rockwood or Wicked Good as an all purpose lump if that’s what you are looking for. 

    If if you want to try FOGO, you can use this link to get 10% off your first order. Ordering it direct is the cheapest way to get it in the long run. You want to get the Super Premium (brown bag). 

    http://i.refs.cc/318NHiFL?u=1539650549807

  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 4,346

    You can get away with cheaper lump(typically smaller pieces) for hotter cooks but you burn through it faster...

    ... larger pieces and burns longer. 
    The lump size has nothing to do with the burn time.  1# of charcoal burns the same amount of time at a set temp whether it's a big chunk or a bunch of smaller ones.

    Its BTU/# that determines the burn time and in some cases, larger chunks have a lower BTU/# because of all the wood fiber still holding them together.  Wood has a lower BTU/# than carbon, since water is heavier than carbon.  Those big chunks take longer to burn through in an open air grill, but the BTUs produced can be less.  In a kamado, you are able to meter the oxygen, so that doesn't matter......burn a cannon ball size piece, or bunch of golf ball sized chunks......its all the same burn time if the carbonization is the same to start and the dome temp remains constant.

    Where the big chunks in the Egg come in is for plugging up the grate and clogging the airflow.  In the inverse, if those big chunks have too far of a  gap on a low and slow without a controller, you can run into issues.  The kindling temp for carbon is 673F and you need that much heat to ignite the piece next to it.  And the amount of charcoal actually burning in a kamado with a 225F dome temp is very limited.  So if you don't have a "fire bridge" to carry that heat over to the next piece, the fire can go out.

    Best bet...  Kick Ash Basket and a mix of sizes with properly carbonized lump.  
  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 5,107

    You can get away with cheaper lump(typically smaller pieces) for hotter cooks but you burn through it faster...

    ... larger pieces and burns longer. 
    The lump size has nothing to do with the burn time.  1# of charcoal burns the same amount of time at a set temp whether it's a big chunk or a bunch of smaller ones.

    Its BTU/# that determines the burn time and in some cases, larger chunks have a lower BTU/# because of all the wood fiber still holding them together.  Wood has a lower BTU/# than carbon, since water is heavier than carbon.  Those big chunks take longer to burn through in an open air grill, but the BTUs produced can be less.  In a kamado, you are able to meter the oxygen, so that doesn't matter......burn a cannon ball size piece, or bunch of golf ball sized chunks......its all the same burn time if the carbonization is the same to start and the dome temp remains constant.

    Where the big chunks in the Egg come in is for plugging up the grate and clogging the airflow.  In the inverse, if those big chunks have too far of a  gap on a low and slow without a controller, you can run into issues.  The kindling temp for carbon is 673F and you need that much heat to ignite the piece next to it.  And the amount of charcoal actually burning in a kamado with a 225F dome temp is very limited.  So if you don't have a "fire bridge" to carry that heat over to the next piece, the fire can go out.

    Best bet...  Kick Ash Basket and a mix of sizes with properly carbonized lump.  
    You act like you own a lump charcoal company or something. :)

    Seriously, your post about lump are always very informative. Thanks for sharing that knowledge with us. 
    ~ John - https://www.instagram.com/hoosier_egger
    (2) XL BGE, LG BGE, KJ Jr, Ardore Pizza Oven, King Disc 
    Bloomington, IN - Hoo Hoo Hoo Hoosiers!

  • Rockwood is the best! I’m lucky enough to live in the same region as @stlcharcoal so it’s available in a lot of local locations. Fantastic product and even better person behind the brand. 👍
    Edwardsville, IL (Near St. Louis, MO)
    Large Big Green Egg & Weber Genesis II 
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 11,386

    You can get away with cheaper lump(typically smaller pieces) for hotter cooks but you burn through it faster...

    ... larger pieces and burns longer. 
    The lump size has nothing to do with the burn time.  1# of charcoal burns the same amount of time at a set temp whether it's a big chunk or a bunch of smaller ones.

    Its BTU/# that determines the burn time and in some cases, larger chunks have a lower BTU/# because of all the wood fiber still holding them together.  Wood has a lower BTU/# than carbon, since water is heavier than carbon.  Those big chunks take longer to burn through in an open air grill, but the BTUs produced can be less.  In a kamado, you are able to meter the oxygen, so that doesn't matter......burn a cannon ball size piece, or bunch of golf ball sized chunks......its all the same burn time if the carbonization is the same to start and the dome temp remains constant.

    Where the big chunks in the Egg come in is for plugging up the grate and clogging the airflow.  In the inverse, if those big chunks have too far of a  gap on a low and slow without a controller, you can run into issues.  The kindling temp for carbon is 673F and you need that much heat to ignite the piece next to it.  And the amount of charcoal actually burning in a kamado with a 225F dome temp is very limited.  So if you don't have a "fire bridge" to carry that heat over to the next piece, the fire can go out.

    Best bet...  Kick Ash Basket and a mix of sizes with properly carbonized lump.  
    If only Jason was around to explain BTUs.
  • LegumeLegume Posts: 11,386
    Maybe just package like Pringle’s, those chips are never broken.
  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 16,849
    Nice writeup @stlcharcoal. Now go plow that driveway. Mama’s got shopping to do. 
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 4,346
    Nice writeup @stlcharcoal. Now go plow that driveway. Mama’s got shopping to do. 
    Already done.....15 minutes on the Polaris 800X2.  I couldn't get the truck up the hill last night so I had already gotten the first 4" of it.  Glad I did it then, otherwise I would have been getting the tractor out to plow the first swath.  
  • what do you do with the tailings?
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 4,346
    what do you do with the tailings?
    I guess you mean the fines?

    We sell those for agricultural use.  Biochar soil amendment.  It's a fantastic way to aerate tough soil and raise the pH.  Holds the nitrogen & oxygen, filters out toxins, provides a micro "reef" for all the little critters in the soil.  It's a miracle product and last forever.

    We actually shipped quite a bit of it up to Alaska.....to green houses that uses the LED's because the growing season is so short.  Yields were way up by boosting the carbon in the soil.  Their mushrooms and tomatoes were HUGE.

    They also get used in swine and poultry feed, copper manufacturing, landfill retention walls, etc.  We've even sold it to the Army for making munitions like flares and rockets......they wouldn't send me any samples.

    So for everyone that complains we're selling them fines, they don't realize that there's almost just as money in them as lump.  Once biochar really catches on in the US, we'll be paying to grind up lump to make it.  But with all the fertilizer companies here in STL and the Midwest, I doubt that will happen anytime soon.  There's a reason why "organic" falls under much less stringent rules in this country as it does in others.
  • At $20.99 bag (less any ACE discounts) Rockwood is my lump. I can’t afford to use cheap lump to cook my $20 dry aged ribeyes or porterhouses!  

    BGE XL++Flameboss 300 WiFi++Blackstone 36"++Weber 26" kettle

  • larrydlarryd Posts: 114
    I used to use royal oak I used to use royal oak because it was handy, got to where the smoke was unpleasant and I don’t need any rocks. Switched to rock wood when Ace started ordering it. Watch for coupons and sales if you’re a member.
  • @stlcharcoal cool! I figured there was a lot of "fines" and the only thing I knew they used them for was filtering water or moonshine...
    South of Columbus, Ohio.
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 4,346
    @stlcharcoal cool! I figured there was a lot of "fines" and the only thing I knew they used them for was filtering water or moonshine...
    Yeah and there's a sh!tload of them this time of year when the ground is frozen.  How many hundred tons can I put you down for?
  • At $20.99 bag (less any ACE discounts) Rockwood is my lump. I can’t afford to use cheap lump to cook my $20 dry aged ribeyes or porterhouses!  
    Well put! Buy the best cooking vessel known to man, buy quality meat, then save $0.75 per pound on cheap fuel doesn't make sense to me. With that being said, only Rockwood or  FOGO go on the XL, but for the mini I use Kingsford (blue and white bag), I usually only cook burgers or chicken on the mini though....
    Chicago, IL BGE XL BGE Mini Webber Charcoal / Elmhurst, IL
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 10,677

    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • SkrullbSkrullb Posts: 666
    FOGO
    I'm in Fredericksburg, VA, and I have an XL and a medium. 
  • Rockwood mostly, some Royal Oak for hot and fast only.
    In a pinch I will use Cowboy when I'm out of plywood scraps and old pressure treated deck boards !
    LBGE, and just enough knowledge and gadgets to be dangerous .
    Buford,Ga.
  • bgebrentbgebrent Posts: 19,636
    Has anyone mentioned Rockwood?
    Sandy Springs & Dawsonville Ga
  • mEGG_My_DaymEGG_My_Day Posts: 1,602
    I used this in the past (I’m told it’s royal oak packaged for commercial use).  I still use it for clean burns, because it is inexpensive.  Now, I use Rockwood for almost everything. 


    Memphis, TN 

    LBGE, 2 SBGE, Hasty-Bake Gourmet
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