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Boneless Turkey breast

My mother gave me a whole purdue 10lbs boneless breast.  It's white and dark meat with skin.  She said its what county school system uses when they do their turkey dinners in the cafeteria.  My plan is to smoke it Saturday for my wifes "Friendsgiving" party.  Currently it is thawing in the fridge.  I plan on doing a simple brine Thursday night or Friday morning.  I have a cajun injector creole butter in the closet too.  Should I brine and inject or just brine it and season it?  350 for a few hours, until 160*?  
Franklin, TN

Comments

  • okieokie Posts: 33
    I just did a 9 pounder yesterday. I simply dry brined it overnight, and then a light coat of olive oil and seasoned it. Everyone said it was great. Cooked at 230-250 and it took about 4 hours or so-about 30 minutes a pound.  I spent very little time or effort preparing it. 
    Muskogee, OK LBGE
  • I did a small boneless all white meat turkey breast roast on Thanksgiving.  It was a ButterBall and was injected full of the salt solution.  I just gave it some dry rub right before throwing it on the egg...came out perfectly juicy and no risk of over salting it with the brine.  
    Augusta, GA
    #BGETEAMGREEN member
    MiniMax, Large, XL BGE
    Featured on Man Fire Food Season 7
  • FoghornFoghorn Posts: 6,951
    It it's "pre-brined" as most are - water and salt added - then you definitely don't need to brine.  

    As for injecting, that's a different issue.  If you want to add some particular flavor to the meat (melted butter steeped in fresh herbs with some rub added is one I saw recently for a great turkey recipe) then do it.  If not, then don't.  

    When I cook ribs, I ask "who am I cooking for?".  One of my rib recipes is based on a competition recipe that involves margarine, brown sugar, and other steps.  They come out tasting great - but not really like classic pork rib meat... more fancy and sweet.  Some times I just want some dry rubbed ribs.  

    So, try it one way this time.  Do it another way the next.

    I will warn you that once you get your audience used to a fancier recipe it can be difficult to go back to just throwing on some rub and throwing it on the grill.  

    XL BGE, Klose BYC, ProQ Excel, Weber Kettle, Firepit, Grand Turbo gasser, and a portable Outdoor Gourmet gasser for tailgating

    San Antonio, TX

  • Ok, Guess I need to read the label and see if its "pre-brined".  That would definetly save me some time.
    Franklin, TN
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,302
    edited November 2018
    Don't think it will take hours at 350º.  A breast with both dark and white meat? How do they do that?  Might be worth carefully checking what you actually have.  I think its their food service product which is breast meat with a solution of salt and sugar already injected.  Don't think you want to brine or inject with a sugar based injection.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 790
    If it’s fresh do a simple salt and brown sugar brine. If it’s processed (pre brined) do nothing but cook it. 
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • Don't think it will take hours at 350º.  A breast with both dark and white meat? How do they do that?  Might be worth carefully checking what you actually have.  I think its their food service product which is breast meat with a solution of salt and sugar already injected.  Don't think you want to brine or inject with and sugar based injection.
    Its the food service product from GFS.  
    Franklin, TN
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,302
    That Perdue product is already brined and sugar injected.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • SmokeyPittSmokeyPitt Posts: 10,039
    Sounds like this:
    https://www.perduefoodservice.com/products/35062-perdue-no-antibiotics-ever-ready-to-cook-whitedark-boneless-skin-on-turkey-roast-foil-wrapped-18-marination/

    It looks like it is a de-boned turkey and includes thigh/leg meat attached. 

    CONTAINS UP TO 18% OF A SOLUTION OF WATER, SALT, SUGAR, SODIUM PHOSPHATES.

    It is already "pre-brined". 



    Which came first the chicken or the egg?  I egged the chicken and then I ate his leg. 

  • Yup that's the one.   I'll just throw some rub on the outside and put it in the egg. 
    Franklin, TN

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