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Wok gurus! I need some re-seasoning advice

I have a carbon steel wok that's a couple years old.  When I first got it, I seasoned it with oil, baked in the Egg for 30 minutes, then charred with green onions.  I'm not sure I did it right, because its never really been non-stick.  

I've cooked kung pao shrimp, and Beef & Broccoli dozens of times.  Lots of soy sauce, brown sugar, ginger, etc.  When I bring it inside after cooking, I rinse it out with water, and scrub with kosher salt.  I have washed it out with dish soap on occasion, but I always dry it thoroughly, and wipe it down with oil to keep it from rusting.  

It's starting to get a black sticky coating, like creosote.  I feel like that's not the seasoning it's supposed to have.  Check out the pics. 


Should the wok be smooth?  Should the wok have this on it?  If not, how do I get it off?  Thanks everyone!

 

LBGE since June 2012

Omaha, NE

Comments

  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,273
    edited March 21
    What oil?

    Treat it like cast iron, keep using it.  At least that's what I would do.

    My CS/CI skillets, griddles, are like this.  It happens.  No worries.  

    My 2 CS woks are not perfect.  And CS, in my experience, is more finnicky than CI.

    A few, I get anal about.

    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • ElijahElijah Posts: 293
    I've had the sticky stuff come up. I believe it's just where the last oil hasn't done it's thing and you're adding to it for a few layers. If it were me I'd just keep using it. It'll sort itself out. If it bothers you, you can strip it and start over. I am of the opinion that a well used CI/CS takes care of itself for the most part.
  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,002
    first, dont work so hard to clean it, second, dont oil it and put it away.

    you are removing the season with the heavey salt scrub.
    you are removing some season with the soap.
    you are softening the remaining season with a fresh oil wipe

    if you put fresh oil in its best to preseason it with heat

    most i ever do is toss a 1/8 cup water in it when its hot, move it around with the shovel, wipe it out with a paper towel. it never leaves the burner it sits on
  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 578
    Thanks @fishlessman.  I never considered the water/steam clean option

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • fishlessmanfishlessman Posts: 23,002
    SaltySam said:
    Thanks @fishlessman.  I never considered the water/steam clean option
    the chinese takeout has a faucet right over the giant woks, dont flood it, just use enough that it instantly dances in the hot wok to loosen the burnt sugars. 
  • smbishopsmbishop Posts: 1,966
    @SaltySam

    This is mine, I use it at least once a week.  After cooking, I wash it with hot water and a stainless steel mesh: 

    https://smile.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FKBR1ZG/ref=oh_aui_search_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

    I do dry it on the stove top and add a bit of oil at low heat for about 15 minutes..

    I think yours is fine, keep on cooking!


    Southlake, TX.  And any chance I get,  @ Cowhouse Creek - Gatesville, TX
  • When I seasoned my CS wok, I coated the interior with Crisco and heated the backside with a Mapp torch, which served to polymerize the Crisco. The seasoning has held up great.

    For the record, a bit of rough texture on the interior of a wok is a good thing - it helps you park food in places for more or less exposure to heat during cooking.
  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,662
    That thick build-up is often from over-oiling it before putting it up.  Then that oil hardens in a thick, gooey layer and some flakes off when you're using utensils and hitting it with food and oil.

    IMHO, you start with a very thin seasoning.  Any buildup during cooking should be scrubbed off, dry, then hit with a VERY THIN layer of oil before putting it up.  You try to wipe off all the oil off with a paper towel kind of thin layer.  The thick uneven crud is not good for flavor or non-stick.

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  • SaltySamSaltySam Posts: 578
    This is exactly what I was looking for.  I knew I was screwing something up, but couldn't figure out what it was.   Thanks everyone.  

    LBGE since June 2012

    Omaha, NE

  • ColtsFanColtsFan Posts: 1,783
    Yup, the gumminess is caused by too much oil. Learned this the hard way with the Blackstone 
    Two large BGE, KJ Jr, 36" Blackstone, FlameBoss 300
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  • NorthPilot06NorthPilot06 Posts: 354
    That thick build-up is often from over-oiling it before putting it up.  Then that oil hardens in a thick, gooey layer and some flakes off when you're using utensils and hitting it with food and oil.

    IMHO, you start with a very thin seasoning.  Any buildup during cooking should be scrubbed off, dry, then hit with a VERY THIN layer of oil before putting it up.  You try to wipe off all the oil off with a paper towel kind of thin layer.  The thick uneven crud is not good for flavor or non-stick.

    Agree with @nolaegghead and @ColtsFan - it comes down to over-oiling. You can burn that off, similar to how you can burn creosote off of an egg. No harm done, you’ve still got an excellent cooking vessel!
    DFW - 1 LGBE & Happy to Adopt More...
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,248
    Sorry  the pictures were kidnapped by photobucket,
    When I find one like you describe,I do soap and water and a brillo pad if it is just little dirty and rusty or  I take oven easy off cleaner. if it is really ugly.  Do this outside as the fumes are nasty.
      I am working on one now that has taken 5 coats, let each rest 10-15 minutes.  After I get off what the cleaner will get, I take my mapp torch and burn the rest.  This step is not always necessary.  Then I place some peanut oil and do a 400F in the oven or on the grill.  I turn the pan upside down with a drip pan so and excess oil does not drain to the center of the pan and catch fire. About 30 minutes per turn and will sometimes rub with an oil paper towel.  I may coat 2-3 times over.

    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=1210286&catid=1

    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=978339&catid=1


    Here is a link to some fried rice and after I seasoned a cast iron wok.

    http://www.greeneggers.com/index.php?option=com_simpleboard&func=view&id=1240419&catid=1

  • SimcanSimcan Posts: 260
    I messed up seasoning CI before I knew what I was doing, and after a couple of unsatisfactory years I eventually did a reset by running it through my self-cleaning oven cycle.  This stripped it to bare metal and I seasoned properly afterward.  I have never done this with CS so perhaps someone can weigh in but it worked great on CI.  
    Toronto ON
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