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Brisket cook advice (troubleshoot)

Gravytrain84Gravytrain84 Posts: 265
so I cooked my first brisket last night/today. It was a 12# prime packer from Costco that I put on at 10pm last night and it cooked until 11am today at 250. Once the probe reached 195, I started spot checking with thermopen and I was getting readings from 185-205 with the majority of the flat feeling like “butta”. I then pullled it, let it cool 30 min, then let it rest In foil for an hour. Fast forward to noon and I begin to slice the cow up... it looked and smelt heavenly but the majority of the flat was fairly tough and dry despite having excellent flavor. 

So my question is.... did I over or under cook? I’m trying to troubleshoot so my next Brisket is better. 

Thanks in advance!


Comments

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 7,905
    I would guess over cooked a bit. Start the probe earlier next time but I bet the point was nice.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Gravytrain84Gravytrain84 Posts: 265
    You’re right about that, the point was delicious. 
  • The Cen-Tex SmokerThe Cen-Tex Smoker Posts: 17,692
    If any part was 185 you were under. If it were over, it would have fallen apart when you sliced it. 
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  • minniemohminniemoh Posts: 2,101
    My results are in line with what Cen-Tex says.

    My suggestion is don't be discouraged - may have been the cow. Do you know what your internal temp was when you sliced it? I have had the best results when slicing in the 140-150 IT range. I have followed the exact same process as you described and I've had some turn out like that too. It seems that more often, I am satisfied with the results when using this method.
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  • nolaeggheadnolaegghead Posts: 26,699
    If there were some non-buttah parts of the flat, I would say undercooked.   But I would think an hour of foil would fix that.  Usually overcooked is not tough at all, but seems "dry" as the gelatin and fat are rendered out.
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  • Gravytrain84Gravytrain84 Posts: 265
    If there were some non-buttah parts of the flat, I would say undercooked.   But I would think an hour of foil would fix that.  Usually overcooked is not tough at all, but seems "dry" as the gelatin and fat are rendered out.
    Over cooked would crumble as it’s being cut, right? This one didn’t crumble at all. 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,777
    I'm with the undercooked crowd-and your comment about over-cooked crumbling is close to how it acts.  
    BTW-someone made a good point about "the feel".  Since the point is just along for the ride, has a much higher fat content and its temperature doesn't matter, when you probe the point and get that "smooth as buttah" feel then you will know what to look for with the flat.
    It is not uncommon for the thinnest end of the flat to turn out on the dry side.  I generally foil protect it for the first several hours of the cook but that doesn't guarantee a different outcome.  As long as the bulk of the flat is "there" then you are good to go.  

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  • Gravytrain84Gravytrain84 Posts: 265
    Appreciate the info. I guess it’ll just take practice to learn the feel and right timing. Take a look at where my probe was, should it have been more towards the flat?
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,777
    Looks like you were in the flat.  Sometimes the probe can end up in a fat pocket.  Had a brisket cook last week where that happened.  The cook was progressing at warp-speed.  Moved the probe and things returned to normal.  You were right to confirm the feel with your thermopen.
    Always remember, "The friggin cow drives the cook."  
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
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