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Time to give it up (rub)

  What is your best homemade rub. 
  I'm not looking for store bought rub but rubs that you make from home and think that they are better than the store bought ones.
   
  I'm not sure how throwdown's work, but lets see who can come up with the best original rub recipe. That we can give a try over the next couple of weeks and maybe come up with a winner
   

Comments

  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,048
    I think several of us can give you home made rub recipes. However, I know If I were to give you the ones I have none of them are my own concoctions, but ones which have been shared on these forums multiple times! I think your throw down of original recipes will have few takers.
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • Richard FlRichard Fl Posts: 8,248
    edited February 5
    I have enjoyed this rub for 15+ years.

    Rub, Jimmy Joe"s  "BBQ-PIT-MASTER", Alabama B-B-Q Rub (2)

    INGREDIENTS:
    3 Cup Smoked Paprika
    1/2 Cup Mustard Powder, preferably Colemans
    1 1/2 Cup Fine Sea Salt, I used my Rainbow salt blend
    1 Cup Black Pepper, Fine ground
    1/2 Cup Cayenne or Fine Red Pepper, to taste heat
    1/2 Cup Garlic Powder
    1/2 Cup Onion Powder

    PROCEDURE:

    1. Mix all and place in a sealed container.  Will last for several months if not used up first.

    Recipe Type: Barbecue, Rub/Seasoning/Spice

    Source
    Source: Jake & Charlies BBQ, Jimmy Brooks, "BBQ-PIT MASTER", 2016/01/08

    Author Notes
    Took the original recipe and played a little.

    If I had used regular white salt instead of my Rainbow mixture the color would be lighter.

    04/18//2016--RPH--  My friend Jimmy broke his C1  June  '14 and his widow pulled the life support 3 days later  They were like brother and sister to me for 30 years. He was 68 when he passed and was in the "Q" business most of his life  originally from Huntsville Al. Never finished college but was one BIG Alabama fan.
    He never wrote the recipe down, but gave me some whenever I wanted.  I asked him why he never wrote it down and his answer  "I keep changing my mind"



  • Markarm4119Markarm4119 Posts: 303
    I make my own rubs, but like your pal Jimmy, hardly ever right them down, usually the following with some subtle changes:
    Paprika
    Black Pepper
    Kosher salt
    Granulated Garlic
    Onion powder
    Cayenne
    Cumin
    Celery salt
    Tones 6 pepper blend
    With pork add some Brown sugar

    LBGE, and just enough knowledge and gadgets to be dangerous .
    Buford,Ga.
  • Paul B.Paul B. Posts: 57
    Depends on what is in the spice drawer....  I just ripped through a bottle of Dinosaur BBQ's "Cajun Foreplay" that I bought when I was up in buffalo last month.  For store bought I was impressed!  I hate that they put salt in the rub.  I do mine separate...

    Any opinions on whether the rub marinates better with the salt mixed in? (you know how it gets a deeper flavor when the rub sits for a few days?)
  • baychillabaychilla Posts: 305
    Between looking for an easy way out and prices out here being such that a home made anything is pretty much not financially logical (eg: I buy pork belly for more per pound than I can buy a boutique applewood smoked brand for) . Moreso for rubs/sauces... I got nothing.
    Near San Francisco in California
  • JohnInCarolinaJohnInCarolina Posts: 11,563
    Start with some salt.  Add pepper.  Then add more pepper.  Declare victory.
    "If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots." - NdGT

    "The truth is, these are not very bright guys, and things got out of hand." - DT


  • WoodchunkWoodchunk Posts: 638
    Been making this for many years
  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,127
    edited February 6
    I've never invented my own rub, but I've made several I've found in books or online.  These are two of my favorites:

    A Fennel-chile rub from Saveur was just spectacular on a thick steak.  Most of the time I prefer steaks with just salt and pepper, but once in a while I want something different, and this was amazing!  It's from a James Beard Award winner chef, who says "It works on just about anything: chicken, mackerel, wild salmon, vegetables, steaks, whatever."  Oh, and I toasted the chile in it, not just the other spices, and thought it helped.

    A South African Braai rub from the NY Times was also really great.
  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    Not a participant in throwdown or providing a mix.......but suggest you use the best and freshest ingredients available to you. It makes a difference. Where I live I have trouble finding quality spices and herbs. There are options available thanks to the web. Purchase in consertive amounts....and Make your rubs in small batches in order keep as fresh as possiable. Like preparing your food on an egg, adjust to improve with each batch. Use recipes as a starting / reference. If you like some flavor profiles better than others....well adjust and see what happens. With assembling rubs, it’s not like you are taking medicine. Color outside the lines....sorry for the cliches. 

    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,937
    I've been messing w. making my own rubs for, hmmm, 'bout 18 years. Still don't have a best. Have learned a few things.

    American rubs are mostly sugar and salt. Rubs for pork tend to be heavier on sugar. For beef, its salt. Those 2 alone account for at least 1/3 of most rubs. Almost all have onion and garlic powder.

    I think someone on the forum used "SPOG" to refer to them. Paprika and black pepper are in most, and in large quantities. I suspect that its large quantities because the flavor cooks out easily.  Most always some other kinds of chili, from mild like ancho up to searing scotch bonnet. Often mustard and cumin. Some herbs like thyme, rosemary, savory, and oregano, particularly if the rub is for poultry.

    Most recipes I've come across use the above often in pretty much the same proportions. Things don't get interesting till a few of the ingredients play a really big role. I've seen recipes for pork, mostly ribs, that were essentially sugar. For beef, salt and a healthy dose of black pepper. SPOG and lots of cayenne.

    The one's that I've liked best tend to have something added in that pushes the standard base in a different direction. Recently, I made a blend that had some cloves in it, which I usually avoid. It turned out surprising good. I put together one for beef that added allspice and a tiny amount of Szechuan pepper to the regular peppers. There was just enough of the "what is that hint of flavor?" in the mix that kept me tasting.

    I've also started grinding my own spices. Buy them whole, and pound them in a mortar just before use. Way more flavor than pre-ground, and a much longer shelf life. Also, because salt and sugar are usually inexpensive, and can sit around for years, I don't have to pay extra to toss them into a bottle, but mix them in to fit with whatever I'm cooking.
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,103
    .......but suggest you use the best and freshest ingredients available to you. It makes a difference. Where I live I have trouble finding quality spices and herbs. There are options available thanks to the web. Purchase in consertive amounts....and Make your rubs in small batches in order keep as fresh as possiable. ... 
    Buying in bulk can be more convenient and more economical.  You just need to use the spices before they lose their potency.  Whole spices keep much longer than ground. I vacuum seal and then freeze the bulk of my spices.  They keep for a long time this way.  Mix up small batches as needed to have at the ready for daily cooking.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    .......but suggest you use the best and freshest ingredients available to you. It makes a difference. Where I live I have trouble finding quality spices and herbs. There are options available thanks to the web. Purchase in consertive amounts....and Make your rubs in small batches in order keep as fresh as possiable. ... 
    Buying in bulk can be more convenient and more economical.  You just need to use the spices before they lose their potency.  Whole spices keep much longer than ground. I vacuum seal and then freeze the bulk of my spices.  They keep for a long time this way.  Mix up small batches as needed to have at the ready for daily cooking.
    No argument with your point.....purchasing in conservative amounts will be different for everyone. You support my point with the potential to loose potency.

    I think we agree that making in small batches is sound....but also allows you to improve on your rubs by making changes in ingredient amounts.
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • whldchwhldch Posts: 98
    You can see from the responses that there is no one favorite. The best part of making your own is to improvise and keep playing around until you find what you and your guests love. A few times I followed a recipe and thought that one rub was "it" only to add or take something away and like it even more. Sometimes simple is best as in S&P. For me, it makes me want to cook again and try something new. It's part of the journey, enjoy it
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