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OT _ Fried Rice

billt01billt01 Posts: 715
So...

I have sees several methods to the hibachi style fried rice...

"Day Old rice"
"Sherry" or "Miran" (sp)
"White Pepper"
"Mix the eggs in the rice before the cooker"
"Mix the eggs in on the cooker"
"Mix in eggs before AND on the cooker"
"Sugar"
"Teriyaki sauce"
"Soy sauce"
"Worcestershire sauce"
" Effing Ketchup"
"Sesame seeds"
"Sesame oil"
"frozen carrots and peas"

Hard to sift through all the BS on the web...

any help from y'all on what works would be appreciated...  
 "Don't listen to her, Bob.Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach."
                                                                                                 -Jane
                                                                                                 "Man and Superman"
Have:
LBGE / Stumps Baby XL / Couple of Stokers (Gen 1 and Gen 3), Blackstone 36

Had:
Lang 60D, Cookshack SM150, Stumps Stretch, Stumps Baby

Fat Willies BBQ
Ola, Ga

Comments

  • EoinEoin Posts: 1,521
    Generally, for fried rice you want cold rice with separated grains. The most important part is cooking it right, if the rice is soggy / stuck together it just won't work.
  • DMWDMW Posts: 12,464
    Fried Rice is the Asian equivalent to American casserole. Basically, it can be just about anything and traditionally it was an end of week, use up the leftovers thing. That's why you see such variety in recipes. It would be like looking for a singular casserole recipe.
    My Facebook Page where I document my cooking
    Morgantown, PA

    XL BGE - S BGE - KJ Jr - HB Legacy - BS Pizza Oven - 30" Firepit - King Kooker Fryer -  PR72T - 18.5" WSM - WSJ - BS 17" Griddle - XXL BGE - Akron Jr - BS SS36" Griddle
  • Kent8621Kent8621 Posts: 331
    we use brown rice, works better if you make it the day before.  a couple eggs, frozen peas and carrots mix, onion and liquid aminos.  the liquid aminos are great substitute for soy sauce and far less salt content.  the taste is the same to me at least.  I typically do it with some grapeseed oil or vegetable oil on the blackstone.  cook the eggs in one corner the veggies in the other, as they get done add the rice stir and add the amnios.

    2 Large Eggs - Huntsville, AL

    Boiler Up!!

  • billt01billt01 Posts: 715
    thanks all
     "Don't listen to her, Bob.Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach."
                                                                                                     -Jane
                                                                                                     "Man and Superman"
    Have:
    LBGE / Stumps Baby XL / Couple of Stokers (Gen 1 and Gen 3), Blackstone 36

    Had:
    Lang 60D, Cookshack SM150, Stumps Stretch, Stumps Baby

    Fat Willies BBQ
    Ola, Ga

  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,314
    For fried rice here's some of my workflow: 

    • Cook rice prefreably day before and spread on a sheet pan, sit in the fridge overnight not covered all the way.  
    • I use a 1:1 ratio water to rice for a dryer rice.  
    • I use low sodium soy sauce
    • I use really any veggie and meat.  Like @DMW said, it's like a US casserole.  Sky is the limit.  
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
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  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    When do you add the lice?
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • AviatorAviator Posts: 1,722
    When do you add the lice?
    Before you start. Will keep you brisk at the BS and work it with a lot of gusto.
     =) Sorry, just had to. 

    ______________________________________________ 

    Large and Small BGE, Blackstone 36 and a baby black Kub.

    Chattanooga, TN.

     

  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,314
    When do you add the lice?
    Me?  

    I add first thing, but on low/med on the BS.  Generous amounts of clarified butter down, then more on top.  I let that go while the veggies are getting happy.  

    When veggies start to get happy, I'll bring the rice to the middle and get that browned up, then incorporate the veggies.  
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
    Facebook
    My Photography Site
  • DMW said:
    Fried Rice is the Asian equivalent to American casserole. Basically, it can be just about anything and traditionally it was an end of week, use up the leftovers thing. That's why you see such variety in recipes. It would be like looking for a singular casserole recipe.
    Like DMW says, none of the asian restaurants we visit treat fried rice the same. Figure out what you like and roll with it. Except ketchup, that just seems wrong.
    Stillwater, MN
  • northGAcocknorthGAcock Posts: 10,017
    When do you add the lice?
    Me?  

    I add first thing, but on low/med on the BS.  Generous amounts of clarified butter down, then more on top.  I let that go while the veggies are getting happy.  

    When veggies start to get happy, I'll bring the rice to the middle and get that browned up, then incorporate the veggies.  
    No Matt...a weak attempt a humor. I need a Lote. 
    Columbia, South Carolina with a Medium, MiniMax & a 17" Blackstone

    Talk-in' 'bout, hey now! Hey now! I-ko, I-ko, un-day
    Jock-a-mo fee-no ai na-né, jock-a-mo fee na-né

  • tarheelmatttarheelmatt Posts: 9,314
    When do you add the lice?
    Me?  

    I add first thing, but on low/med on the BS.  Generous amounts of clarified butter down, then more on top.  I let that go while the veggies are getting happy.  

    When veggies start to get happy, I'll bring the rice to the middle and get that browned up, then incorporate the veggies.  
    No Matt...a weak attempt a humor. I need a Lote. 
    =)
    ------------------------------
    Thomasville, NC
    My YouTube Channel
    Facebook
    My Photography Site
  • My take on this is pretty much the same as everyone with the following exception(s):
    I start with finely chopped up Onion and a light pressed oil (grape seed or olive) with a touch of sesame oil and soften up the onion till they are transparent.  I may add a little garlic to this process for a bit more flavor.

    The rest of the process is about the same... add peas and carrots, toss together with the onions and garlic.  Scramble a couple of eggs on the side to be added towards the end of the cook.  Once all the veggies (and meats if I add any) are all warmed through I add the day old rice and mix this all together.  I lastly add Tamari sauce (or soy) to get the proper color/final taste.

    Pretty simple process and I really don't think it can be messed up!

    Best of luck!

    In a full time state of entropious nebulinity as Head Brewmeister and Chief Flatulator @ Rancho Loco Brewery and Flatutorium, Kirkland, TN

  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,937
    My wife had a friend, Chinese-American, born in China. For her, fried rice was essentially left-overs. What ever. Started w. butter, but said sesame oil was good. Had never seen sesame oil at the time. Used tamari sauce when available, soy otherwise. Liked adding in ginger powder, some paprika. Preferred chopped snow peas to frozen peas, but at the time those were rare. She usually pushed the mess to the side, and fried an egg, which was than chopped up after the edges browned. We came to prefer mixing it thru the mass right at the end.

    She would use canned water chestnut, baby corn, sometimes bamboo shoots. We've dropped those. From what I understand, canned water chestnuts are to fresh what canned okra is to fresh. Avoid in most cases. Also standards like carrots, broccoli florets, scallions, garlic.

    I still mostly fry with butter, but add some tahini towards the end for the sesami flavor. Add thin slices of hot peppers instead of paprika. Never found any true mirin, and I don't like sherry.
  • bookswbooksw Posts: 295
    my sister in law is from Beijing- she always adds anchovies as a seasoning when she makes fried rice
    Charleston, SC

    L/MiniMax Eggs
  • stv8rstv8r Posts: 638
    ColtsFan said:
    I use day old Jasmine rice, onion, frozen peas/carrots, and the eggs directly on the blackstone and then mix. Soy sauce, red pepper flake and sesame oil finish it off.

    added protein optional


    That's some fine looking rice there for sure!
  • BotchBotch Posts: 6,333
    I lightly oil my wok, heat up on the Small, mix 1 or two eggs in a bowl, then pour into the wok and immediately swirl, to cover as much of the wok surface as possible (you want a large, thin egg "pancake").  Remove, roll into a loose roll, slice every 1/4" across roll (giving you a bunch of long strips), then slice once along the length of the roll (giving you a bunch more short strips).  
    Reheat wok, oil, and add onion, rice to cook, adding any veg and proteins (leftovers) according to their required cooking times.  Add the egg strips to reheat and serve.
    Note:  sesame oil should be used as a seasoning (sparingly), never as a cooking oil (it burns easily).  
    _____________________________________________
     
    Live fast, die young, and leave a well-marbled corpse.  
     
    Ogden, Utard.  
  • billt01billt01 Posts: 715
    edited December 2017
    all, I appreciate everyone's input..

    The first go was a mediocre success.

    My process was to start out with a half of stick of slated butter and I slathered that all over the cook top. Next, I added my veggies of onions, peas, and carrots and let those go for ~4  minutes. Then I added my rice and another half stick of butter, sherry, sesame oil, salt and white pepper. I would use the back of my spatula moving the rice like a snow plow from one side of the 36 to the other letting it sit for ~ 30 seconds on every "plow". I knew I may be close as the rice was jumping off the griddle as I have seen it done at many Hibachi restaurants after about 5 minutes

    I added my whipped egg mixture directly into the rice bank and continued to "plow" from left to right another 3 to 4 minutes. The "snow plow" method did a good job at keeping the rice "loose" .

    I think my griddle should have been a bit hotter because I believe the rice could have gone another 3 minutes before it reached the texture I was trying to achieve. 

    Thanks again for the help!
     "Don't listen to her, Bob.Remember: those who can, do; those who can't, teach."
                                                                                                     -Jane
                                                                                                     "Man and Superman"
    Have:
    LBGE / Stumps Baby XL / Couple of Stokers (Gen 1 and Gen 3), Blackstone 36

    Had:
    Lang 60D, Cookshack SM150, Stumps Stretch, Stumps Baby

    Fat Willies BBQ
    Ola, Ga

  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,127
    The only thing I want to add is to urge people to be sure the rice that's destined to be cooked is put in the fridge promptly, and not left out at room temperature very long.

    Many years ago, in a hospital ER in Philadelphia that happened to be near a bunch of Chinese restaurants, I was told that by FAR the most common cause of food poisoning in that ER was fried rice!

    The reason was that the rice that was going to be fried often sat around for a while after it was cooked and before it was fried, so there was a while when it was still warm and moist and a wonderful environment to grow bacteria in.  Bacillus cereus bacterial spores are fairly often found in rice, and boiling won't kill them.  So they can germinate and grow when the cooked rice cools down enough, and as they grow they produce a heat-stable toxin.  When that rice then gets fried, the bacteria are killed, but the toxin is still there!  So people enjoy their fried rice but a while later are exploding at both ends and wishing they were dead.

    Some people think that if there's no animal products it can't spoil.  Boy are they wrong...

    Not a big deal -- no reason not to make fried rice!  Just don't leave the cooked rice out for a long time before chilling it.
  • EggcelsiorEggcelsior Posts: 14,013
    If you forget to make rice ahead of time, cooking it and spreading it on a sheet pan to dessicate out in a low oven works pretty well. Just stir it every once in a while to expose all the grains.
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