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Standing Rib Roast, have butcher cut and tie bones or not?

I have searched older posts about standing rib roasts and most seem focused on cook times and methods. My first question is do I want to have the butcher cut and tie the bones or not? What are the pros and cons to each approach?

I read having the bones cut and tied will make carving to serve easier. But someone else said doing takes away from all the great qualities that come with cooking meat on the bone. 

I would appreciate the collective wisdom of this group.

Comments

  • pgprescottpgprescott Posts: 10,515
    Meh, I have done it all three ways. Off the bone(better sear and rub) , on the bone fully( remove or not depends) and removed and tied back on. I would prolly just buy it off the bone if it was me. I do like ravaging the jones though, but they are expensive for what you do with them. 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 16,755
    As above, if you want to end up with a close to uniform shape when you roast, then no bones.  You can use the cut off and tied back on to get your S&P and additional seasoning between the bones and meat.  You can also separately smoke the bones for great beef back ribs.  As long as you nail the finish temp you are there.  For a uniform cross section I would go low& slow.  Plenty of info on that via the search option.  FWIW-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • As long as you don’t over cook it you really can’t go wrong either way. But the bones are a nice treat. @Ross in Ventura hope you are clear of any past or forthcoming fire damage. 
    Snellville, GA


  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,103
    I read having the bones cut and tied will make carving to serve easier. But someone else said doing takes away from all the great qualities that come with cooking meat on the bone.

    Most of the great qualities of bone on cooking are myths.  You would be better off removing the bones before cooking.  Cook the ribs at the same time for some great beef ribs that never make it out of the kitchen!
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • To me, the only advantage to cut and tied (and retied) is getting the opportunity to season the backside.  If you leave bones in, it’s not hard to debone after cooking, to ease carving.

    For Christmas, I’m thinking boneless - I expect it’ll cook a bit quicker and will get smoke/crust/sear all the way around.
    Maryland, 1 LBGE
  • I have cooked all different ways. I prefer to cook them boneless and tie them with string about and inch apart. I feel that this way makes a better circle and they cook more even from edge to edge.
  • ToxarchToxarch Posts: 1,671
    Beef ribs are awesome. I say cook those separate. You won't want to share.
    Aledo, Texas
    Large BGE
    KJ Jr.

    Exodus 12:9 KJV
    Eat not of it raw, nor sodden at all with water, but roast with fire; his head with his legs, and with the purtenance thereof.

  • I've cooked prime rib both ways, with and without bone and both were great. When I did it with bones, I made stew the next day. Check out
    http://www.the350degreeoven.com/2015/12/meat/leftover-prime-rib-roast-beef-stew-crock-pot-or-slow-cooker-recipe/

  • GrillSgtGrillSgt Posts: 1,720
    I have the butcher cut the rack off and not tie it on. I then rub the roast, usuallly with just a garlic paste with chopped rosemary, salt and pepper. I then tie the rack back on. I then remove the rack for the sear. I use the bones for broth, makes a great base for Texas style chili or a burgoo.
    Woodford & Barren Co. KY

    LBGE, XLBGE, 2 Weber Genesis, Weber 22" kettle

    I’d kill for a Nobel Peace Prize

  • As long as you don’t over cook it you really can’t go wrong either way. But the bones are a nice treat. @Ross in Ventura hope you are clear of any past or forthcoming fire damage. 
    Thank You, yes it was close, to close! We are safe.

    Ross
  • TeefusTeefus Posts: 600
    edited December 2017
    I cook boneless. The bones do make a wonderful beef stock when roasted along with some veggies and then simmered. Last time I reduced the stock way down and used it in French Onion Soup. 
    Michiana, South of the border.
  • kjskjs Posts: 74
    Thanks for all the replies. Looks like I am going to have to just cook all three ways to see what I like. Decided for the first time I am just going to cook on the bone not removed all at. 
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,103
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  •  Nice read. We have only ever cooked or smoked boneless prime rib
  • FockerFocker Posts: 8,255
    Brandon
    Quad Cities
    "If yer gonna denigrate, familiarity with the subject is helpful."

  • 20stone20stone Posts: 1,481
    lousubcap said:
    As above, if you want to end up with a close to uniform shape when you roast, then no bones.  You can use the cut off and tied back on to get your S&P and additional seasoning between the bones and meat.  You can also separately smoke the bones for great beef back ribs.  As long as you nail the finish temp you are there.  For a uniform cross section I would go low& slow.  Plenty of info on that via the search option.  FWIW-
    ^^^^ this ^^^^
    Where the ribs are is a missed opportunity for more yummy  crust on your slices.  Ribs off and smoked separately is my favorite.

    LBGE since 2008 and a MM from 2016
    Karubeque C-60 Dishwasher (when time is no object)
    Owner of multiple large scale refrigeration devices (sometimes too many)
    Vertically integrated BBQ and charcuterie operator, for recreational use only
    Elicitor of secrets from goats through unconventional methods
    Sourdough bread enthusiast

    Houston, TX

  • kjskjs Posts: 74
    @jtcBoynton ok now you made call the butcher and change my order. Thanks. Ok I am going to stop reading now before some makes me change my mind again. Seriously thanks for the input from everyone.
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