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Searing question

LBGE & a MM
I have 4 huge rib eye steaks. Planning reverse sear. Using LBGE for slow and MM for 650° 
Question is does the steak need a rest after pulling from the slow? Or just pull @ IT 210-215 and right onto the heat?

Comments

  • DoubleEggerDoubleEgger Posts: 11,951
    edited October 2017
    No. Most folks rest them because they are waiting for the egg to heat up to searing temps. Sear Away!

    IT of 210-215?  Hoping that's a typo. 
  • etherdomeetherdome Posts: 282
    edited October 2017
    They typically get a rest regardless while getting the egg to searing temp. That’s  how I always DID it. That being said, I have recently gone straight to a 700 degree Webber gasser a few times and I have not seen any difference whatsoever. Just rest it before you eat it. Oh and let’s try a little lower internal temp. Ha ha. 
    Upstate SC
    Large BGE
  • The IT was the temp I was thinking about pulling it from the Large. Finish temp hoping 127. How's that sound?
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,940
    Resting cooked meats is done primarily to let the gels firm up a bit, and hold the juices in before cutting. So, not applicable when moving from long low cooks to the sear phase.
  • Hans61Hans61 Posts: 3,409
    Don’t “need to rest” but most folks wanna know where it’s at before starting to sear

    FWIW- I like my steaks between 130-135

    the temp you cook at during phase one will determine how much carry over cook you get after pulling them, for example, if you do a 225-250 temp for phase one you may only increase IT  5° 

    hope that helps 
    “There are three rules that I live by: never get less than twelve hours sleep; never play cards with a guy who has the same first name as a city; and never get involved with a woman with a tattoo of a dagger on her body.”
    Coach Finstock Teen Wolf
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,948
    LBGE & a MM
    I have 4 huge rib eye steaks. Planning reverse sear. Using LBGE for slow and MM for 650° 
    Question is does the steak need a rest after pulling from the slow? Or just pull @ IT 210-215 and right onto the heat?
    Yes, you need to let them rest so when they are back on for the crust/sear your IT doesn’t creep up on you.  I let mine sit out for at least 20 minutes.  Now, after the crust/sear you can serve immediately.  
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • onedbguruonedbguru Posts: 1,550
    I have done direct 500+ and then I have done the reverse sear ~250ish @ IT 125 then pull, crank it to 600 (leaf blower or fan is great for getting it hot very fast), then sear, pull and serve.  Frankly, I can't tell the difference in texture/tenderness or flavor.  Just my $.02 worth. 
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,718
    Mine almost always go up 10 degrees after indirect cooking so I pull them at 100-105 and let them rest until the temp peaks out.  After that, I hot sear for 2-3 minutes on each side (longer on cast iron) and that brings me to about 130 to 135 after all is said and done.  
    Dave - Austin, TX
  • I agree with the let-it-rest crowd. Carryover cooking makes it all to easy to overshoot your desired temp. Let it hang out for ten minutes or until the temp stops rising then throw it on. 
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