Big Green Egg - EGGhead Forum - The Ultimate Cooking Experience...
Welcome to the EGGhead Forum - a great place to visit and packed with tips and EGGspert advice! You can also join the conversation and get more information and amazing kamado recipes by following Big Green Egg at:

Facebook  |  Twitter  |  Instagram  |  Pinterest  |  Youtube  |  Vimeo
Share your photos by tagging us and using the hashtag #EGGhead4Life.


In Atlanta? Come visit Big Green Egg headquarters, including our retail showroom, the History of the EGG Museum and Culinary Center!  3786 DeKalb Technology Parkway, Atlanta, GA 30340.

Sous vide chuck roast

I broke in my new Anova with a 28 hour sous vide beef chuck roast, and never have I had such tender/moist beef before.  I used the following recipe as a guideline https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/flavor-packed-feast-worthy-chuck-roast. Enjoy!




Comments

  • cookingdude555cookingdude555 Posts: 1,507
    Wow that is fabulous!

    John - SLC, UT

    2 XLs, Medium, MM, and Mini

  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 12,240
    Did you finish with the egg?
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • Carolina QCarolina Q Posts: 13,000
    They ARE good, aren't they? I've done a few (48 hours though) and it's amazing how tender and flavorful they are. Poor man's prime rib (well, almost).

    As for finishing, the egg would make no difference. It's just a quick sear on all sides. Skillet, torch, grid... as long as it' hot.

    I hate it when I go to the kitchen for food and all I find are ingredients!

                                                                …Unknown

    Michael 
    Central Connecticut 

  • steelcity314steelcity314 Posts: 79
    edited July 2017
    YukonRon said:
    Did you finish with the egg?
    I seared it on both sides in a CI pan before the water bath, and finished it in the oven for about 15 minutes at 475. Next time I will try smoking it on the egg at 225 for a couple hours before it goes into the water bath 
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,104
    ...  I used the following recipe as a guideline https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/flavor-packed-feast-worthy-chuck-roast. Enjoy!
    ...
    Interesting recipe.  I was surprised that they include a cook temp less than 130º as one of the options.  Douglas Baldwin offers that: "For tough but flavorful cuts of beef–such as top blade, chuck, and top round–season the meat and cook in a 131°F (55°C) water bath for 24–48 hours. This is the lowest temperature at which (insoluble) collagen denatures (dissolves) into gelatin, at higher temperatures the denaturing occurs more quickly."  Anyone know if this is correct?


    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • WDE86WDE86 Posts: 69
    Looks delish! Great job! I only learned about sous vide last week and I've been reading about them religiously. Haven't seen any negative feedback yet. 
  • YukonRonYukonRon Posts: 12,240
    WDE86 said:
    Looks delish! Great job! I only learned about sous vide last week and I've been reading about them religiously. Haven't seen any negative feedback yet. 
    Get your wallet out. Every major restraunt uses sous vide, more frequently than I had initially realized. I actually have 2. Worth every penny.
    "Knowledge is Good" - Emil Faber

    XL and MM
    Louisville, Kentucky
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,210
    ...  I used the following recipe as a guideline https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/flavor-packed-feast-worthy-chuck-roast. Enjoy!
    ...
    Interesting recipe.  I was surprised that they include a cook temp less than 130º as one of the options.  Douglas Baldwin offers that: "For tough but flavorful cuts of beef–such as top blade, chuck, and top round–season the meat and cook in a 131°F (55°C) water bath for 24–48 hours. This is the lowest temperature at which (insoluble) collagen denatures (dissolves) into gelatin, at higher temperatures the denaturing occurs more quickly."  Anyone know if this is correct?


    Last I read the highest temp a food pathogen grew at is around 126.  I think it was clostridium perfringens. Somewhere around 130 you can pasteurize the buggers. I suppose 129 might be OK like they say?   I run mine in the low 130s for 18-24 hours and they turn out great. 

    @steelcityegger what temp did you use? Looks excellent. 
    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • jtcBoyntonjtcBoynton Posts: 2,104
    The 129º is ok from a food safety standpoint (I have seen the same 126º information).  It is too low to denature collagen which is a desired result when cooking a chuck roast.
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • blind99 said:
    ...  I used the following recipe as a guideline https://www.chefsteps.com/activities/flavor-packed-feast-worthy-chuck-roast. Enjoy!
    ...
    Interesting recipe.  I was surprised that they include a cook temp less than 130º as one of the options.  Douglas Baldwin offers that: "For tough but flavorful cuts of beef–such as top blade, chuck, and top round–season the meat and cook in a 131°F (55°C) water bath for 24–48 hours. This is the lowest temperature at which (insoluble) collagen denatures (dissolves) into gelatin, at higher temperatures the denaturing occurs more quickly."  Anyone know if this is correct?


    Last I read the highest temp a food pathogen grew at is around 126.  I think it was clostridium perfringens. Somewhere around 130 you can pasteurize the buggers. I suppose 129 might be OK like they say?   I run mine in the low 130s for 18-24 hours and they turn out great. 

    @steelcityegger what temp did you use? Looks excellent. 
    I cooked it at 129 and it seemed to come out just fine, perhaps beginners luck. I was cautious to cook it any higher, as I knew I would need to finish it in the oven and didn't want the beef cooked any more than medium rare. 
  • blind99blind99 Posts: 4,210

    You can definitely take it higher, if you want, and keep a nice red interior. (But if it's working for you, why change it)  Here's a pic I dug out - this was 133 degrees, about 24 hours of cooking.





    Chicago, IL - Large and Small BGE - Weber Gasser and Kettle
  • blind99 said:

    You can definitely take it higher, if you want, and keep a nice red interior. (But if it's working for you, why change it)  Here's a pic I dug out - this was 133 degrees, about 24 hours of cooking.





    Oh wow that looks great too. Thank you for the advice, I'll try it a bit higher next time 
  • SSQUAL612SSQUAL612 Posts: 897
    Picked up the VacMaster and can't wait to try it out and I think a roast will be my first cook.  I can't have it this red though or the little one will not eat.


    SoCal  XL BGE 2016, MES, 18.5 WSM,  36"&17" Black Stone, Adj Rig, Woo, Grill Grates, SS Smokeware Cap, KAB,  FB 300, Thermapen 
  • PlutoniumPlutonium Posts: 104
    I need to do one of these ASAP! Did you add butter or anything to the sous vide bag?
    Albuquerque, NM - LBGE and an old rusted gasser that I use for accessory storage.


  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 5,939
    YukonRon said:
    Did you finish with the egg?
    I seared it on both sides in a CI pan before the water bath, and finished it in the oven for about 15 minutes at 475. Next time I will try smoking it on the egg at 225 for a couple hours before it goes into the water bath 
    I've done some experimenting w. pork 1st on Egg, then SV, vs. the opposite. SV concentrates flavor, so the pre-smoked pork ended up w. more smoke than I like, and I like a lot of smoke. My suggestion is maybe just an hour in the Egg to start, and a little hotter to boost the Maillard reactions.
  • Plutonium said:
    I need to do one of these ASAP! Did you add butter or anything to the sous vide bag?
    No butter this time. I sautéed fresh rosemary from the garden and garlic in a CI pan, seared the roast after rubbing with EVOO, salt and pepper and then added the rosemary and garlic to the bag along with the roast for the water bath. 

  • gdenby said:
    YukonRon said:
    Did you finish with the egg?
    I seared it on both sides in a CI pan before the water bath, and finished it in the oven for about 15 minutes at 475. Next time I will try smoking it on the egg at 225 for a couple hours before it goes into the water bath 
    I've done some experimenting w. pork 1st on Egg, then SV, vs. the opposite. SV concentrates flavor, so the pre-smoked pork ended up w. more smoke than I like, and I like a lot of smoke. My suggestion is maybe just an hour in the Egg to start, and a little hotter to boost the Maillard reactions.
    Thanks for the advice, I'll let you know how it goes when I try it next. 
  • I've just recently started using The Joule Sousa Vide.  This is the deal for a big thick filet, pork loin, turkey breast and much more.  Planning a 72 hour chuckie soon. 
    Life's short on this big rock.... Enjoy while you can!
  • WebassWebass Posts: 135
    Chuck roast is my go to when we have red meat eating guests.  I rub EVOO and a generous dousing of Montreal Steak Seasoning, SV at 132 for 24hrs then sear at 600 degrees on LBGE for 90 seconds each side flipping every 30 seconds. Lots of compliments and most are amazed it's chuck.  

    Lenoir City, TN -  Bama fan in Tenn Vol's backyard. 

    LBGE, Weber Spirit 

  • TheophanTheophan Posts: 2,128
    gdenby said:
    ... My suggestion is maybe just an hour in the Egg to start, and a little hotter to boost the Maillard reactions.
    I bought an Anova unit but I've yet to get around to trying it.  Can you tell me a little more about searing it before SV vs searing it after?  I was thinking people usually do the searing after, but I forget why, or where I got that idea.

    Thanks!
Sign In or Register to comment.
Click here for Forum Use Guidelines.