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Lowering the temperature of the egg

Rick1220Rick1220 Posts: 8
I have a large egg and I want to sear some meat but then slow roast it as well.  After i get the high temperature required for searing I cannot get the egg to the 250º temperature I want to slow cook at. At least not in a reasonable amount of time.  Is this do-able or should I sear on another device and slow cook in the egg?  

Comments

  • The_StacheThe_Stache Posts: 1,004
    As you stated, trying to go from high temps down to low temps takes a long time.  Many of us use reverse sear methods where the sear is done after the cook.  You might think along those lines.

    If you trying the "seal in the juices" for a roast, I would suggest searing on top of the stove and then taking the roast to the egg at low temp.

    Best of luck


    In a full time state of entropious nebulinity as Head Brewmeister and Chief Flatulator @ Rancho Loco Brewery and Flatutorium, Kirkland, TN

  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,477
    It's possible with practice, but most of us prefer the "reverse sear" method. Cook first, set aside and raise temp and sear last.
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,748
    I'm not sure how it's "possible with practice" without intervention.

    The fastest way would be to use a Kick Ash Basket so you could remove the hot lump, open the egg up to cool down the outer ceramics, and at some point add back your hot lump and a cool platesetter to achieve a lower cooking temp.   This would be a pain in the butt. 
    Dave - Austin, TX
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,345
    Got a water spigot and hose nearby??    :o
  • lkapigianlkapigian Posts: 4,089
    Get a second Egg, configure one high temp, one low....problem solved 
    Visalia, Ca
  • RRPRRP Posts: 22,477
    Got a water spigot and hose nearby??    :o
    Before newbies gasp at the thought of damage from temperature shock it's common knowledge that BGE have done this test. They run an egg up to 700º and stabilize it. Then for the test they dump a load of ice inside!  
    L, M, S, &  Mini
    And oh yes...also a 17" BlackStone gas fired griddle! 
    Ron
    Dunlap, IL
    Re- gasketing AMERICA one yard at a time!
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,345
    RRP said:
    Got a water spigot and hose nearby??    :o
    Before newbies gasp at the thought of damage from temperature shock it's common knowledge that BGE have done this test. They run an egg up to 700º and stabilize it. Then for the test they dump a load of ice inside!  

    I know......I still wouldn't try it though.  My buddy saw a guy hose off a 700F+ plate setter and it didn't crack. 
  • lousubcaplousubcap Posts: 18,003
    Yesterday I had the fire decide to get going.  My drip pan didn't capture all the grease from a brisket cook.  Running with a PSWOO2, I pulled everything out and tossed about 6 ice cubes into the fire.  Problem solved.  Of course a few hours later with the brisket in the FTC environment it took forever to get the fire cranked up for ABT's.  The challenges of live fire-
    Louisville;  L & S BGEs, PBC, Lang 36; Burnin' wood in the neighbourhood. # 38 for the win.  Life is too short for light/lite beer.  
  • calikingcaliking Posts: 11,780
    If you must, crank up the heat and sear the meat on the grid at fire ring level. Pull the meat off, throw some water (or ice cubes) on the lump and put a platesetter on (or whatever you do for an indirect setup). Even better if you can get a water pan in there. 

    But you'll find it's much easier to reverse sear. And the outcome will not be worse by any measure. .

    #1 LBGE December 2012 • #2 SBGE February  2013 • #3 Mini May 2013
    A happy BGE family in Houston, TX.
  • stlcharcoalstlcharcoal Posts: 3,345
    One thing with the water pan......make sure you keep it full for the rest of the cook as now that fire is set to simmer water.  You can watch the graph on the flameboss and see down to the minute when the water boils off--the temp will spike up 40-50F within a half hour.
  • scdafscdaf Posts: 81
    Did my first reverse sear a couple years ago and have done no other way since.  Perfection will spoil you.
  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 1,432
    One way I've found to bring the temp down quickly is to throw more lump on. It smothers the fire.
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, SMALL, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • Rick1220Rick1220 Posts: 8
    I think I'll read up on reverse searing techniques.  Thanks, I appreciate the fact that so many of you share your techniques, makes egging a pleasure.  
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,748
    td66snrf said:
    One way I've found to bring the temp down quickly is to throw more lump on. It smothers the fire.
    Seems like this step would introduce some nasty smoke, at least until the point in time when the fresh lump gets burned in?  Not sure this would speed up the process of coverting from a high "cooking" temp to a clean burning low-n- slow "cooking" temp.   I could be wrong. 
    Dave - Austin, TX
  • td66snrftd66snrf Posts: 1,432
    td66snrf said:
    One way I've found to bring the temp down quickly is to throw more lump on. It smothers the fire.
    Seems like this step would introduce some nasty smoke, at least until the point in time when the fresh lump gets burned in?  Not sure this would speed up the process of coverting from a high "cooking" temp to a clean burning low-n- slow "cooking" temp.   I could be wrong. 
    @Terrebandit I know when I've been distracted after starting the fire and come out to find it a 600 or so if I throw fresh lump on it brings the temp down pretty quickly. By the time it gets to the lower temp the vocs have burned off. Not something I do everyday but it works. It's much faster than just shutting down the vents IMHO. Try it.
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE, SMALL, MINI, 2 Kubs, Fire Magic Gasser
  • TerrebanditTerrebandit Posts: 1,748
    td66snrf said:
    td66snrf said:
    One way I've found to bring the temp down quickly is to throw more lump on. It smothers the fire.
    Seems like this step would introduce some nasty smoke, at least until the point in time when the fresh lump gets burned in?  Not sure this would speed up the process of coverting from a high "cooking" temp to a clean burning low-n- slow "cooking" temp.   I could be wrong. 
    @Terrebandit I know when I've been distracted after starting the fire and come out to find it a 600 or so if I throw fresh lump on it brings the temp down pretty quickly. By the time it gets to the lower temp the vocs have burned off. Not something I do everyday but it works. It's much faster than just shutting down the vents IMHO. Try it.
    Will do!  Thanks. 
    Dave - Austin, TX
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