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What stain/seal should I use?

So my Big Green Egg table is done. It is made of all pressure treated wood, including the table top.

 I would like to stain the table and seal it, to both protect it from the elements and also to make it easy/sanitary to clean off.

Any help on what specific type of stain/seal I should buy?  Or what to stay away from? I'm new to all this, and I've seen people refer to oil-based and water-based, but don't know the pros or cons of either.


Thanks in advance for y'alls help!!!

Comments

  • DieselkWDieselkW Posts: 871
    edited April 2016
    According to the folks at http://www.cuprinol.com/, you should wait at least one to two months before staining new Pressure Treated wood.

    You may want to apply a clear preservative immediately, but it must be a product manufactured for use on fresh pressure-treated lumber.  One such product is from Rustoleum.

    Indianapolis, IN

    BBQ is a celebration of culture in America. It is the closest thing we have to the wines and cheeses of Europe. 

    Drive a few hundred miles in any direction, and the experience changes dramatically. 



  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 6,102
    Wood is, surprisingly, quite sanitary by itself. Better than plastics. It is rather acidic, dries easily, and so does not provide pathogens w. a good place to live. Pressure treated usually has stuff forced into it that humans should not consume. Makes it 2X harder for nasties to live in. I would not worry to much about sanitary issues as cosmetics. Assuming you are not using the table as a cutting board.

    Pure Tung oil has been used as a boat wood finish for a couple of thousand years. Variants, such as teak oil or danish oil, have most of the same protective properties. If using Tung, apply a coat, and wait a day with the wood under sunlight. Then another coat, and wait 2 days. And again, and wait 4 days. Etc. The color of the wood will become slightly yellower and darker from the oil, but will be water resistant and somewhat harder. AFAIK pure Tung isn't poison. An annual coat will probably be necessary.
  • A little confused as to some of the responses... So after staining my Green Egg table is it necessary or recommended to use some sort of sealer/protectant?? If so, what are y'alls recommendations?

    I've used some type of polyurethane before and it turned my project a hazy-yellow color. I would like to avoid that if possible!

    thanks!
  • posterposter Posts: 575
    What area are you in. If northern, no sealer or top coat will ever last, u have tried plenty.A good transparent stain is best and reapply ever couple years. I like twp-100, if its legal in your area .Use a cutting board when putting any food down
  • jimithingjimithing Posts: 255
    Yeah, what part of the country are you in and will your egg be protected from the sun?  Mine is fully exposed to the Texas sun and I didn't want to use polyurethane because I didn't like what it turns into after a few years.   I went with Sikkens because I can reapply it without having to sand the whole thing down and start over again. 

    http://www.perfectwoodstains.com/view-product/cetol-1-re?category=logs-siding

    They recommend Cetol 1 RE for an application like these tables.  If you look at the Technical data/Application there are instructions on how to tell if your table is ready for staining or not.
    XL BGE
    Plano, TX
  • I'm in the hot and humid panhandle of North Florida, if that helps!
  • So my Big Green Egg table is done. It is made of all pressure treated wood, including the table top.

     I would like to stain the table and seal it, to both protect it from the elements and also to make it easy/sanitary to clean off.

    Any help on what specific type of stain/seal I should buy?  Or what to stay away from? I'm new to all this, and I've seen people refer to oil-based and water-based, but don't know the pros or cons of either.


    Thanks in advance for y'alls help!!!
     Sikkens Cetol 1 
    That is what I have been told by everyone is the best of the best and is what I will be using, someday... Lol. 
    Hope that helps. Post some pics!
    Good luck!!
  • gdenbygdenby Posts: 6,102
    Lookin' around, Sikkens Cetol 1 is just the undercoat for Sikken 23, which is then refreshed after several years w. Cetol Maintenace. Apparently designed for bark off log homes.

    Evidently the #23 finish is to prevent fading from UV.

    AFAIK, there is no wood finish for wood exposed top sun and rain that does not need repeated applications over the years. I agree w @poster, carry a cutting board for the food.
  • DieselkWDieselkW Posts: 871
    In Florida, your enemy is ultra violet light. It will turn poly ugly in a hurry.

    You have new pressure treated wood, you need two steps. A clear preservative to protect the wood while it ages long enough to accept a stain.

    If you stain it too early, you'll just have to do it again.

    Go with the Rustoleum first - to protect it from rain. After 6 weeks or so you can go ahead and stain it any color you want.

    Transparent stains last about a year, where exposed to sunlight.
    Opaque stains last a little longer.
    Full color stain will likely give you several years.

    No stain lasts forever. It's the UV, nature of the beast. Paint lasts the longest, but painting pressure treated wood is not a good idea for at least a few years.

    Indianapolis, IN

    BBQ is a celebration of culture in America. It is the closest thing we have to the wines and cheeses of Europe. 

    Drive a few hundred miles in any direction, and the experience changes dramatically. 



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