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15 Pound Sous Vide Prime Rib

I received a sous vide for my birthday and want to do a boneless prime rib for Christmas.  My game plan is to trim it and apply equal parts salt, pepper, and granulated garlic and let it sit for an hour.  I would then apply a herb paste and vacuum seal it. I pm'd @DMW for his advice and he pointed me to a link that suggested 5-10 hours but it seems the other forum sous vide cooks shoot for much longer cooking times. Has anyone done a large prime rib sous vide and if so could you please pass on the do's and don'ts of the cook.  I searched the site and nothing came up.  Thanks in advance for any help that you can give and I wish everyone a Merry Christmas.
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Comments

  • DMWDMW Posts: 12,683
    The extremely long sous vide times are for cuts that are very tough (brisket, short ribs, etc). The prime rib you have is already tender and only needs to be heated.
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  • ThatgrimguyThatgrimguy Posts: 3,833
    I love me some SV on chicken and small pork roasts. But on beef. I fully agree with @Photo Egg 
    Biloxi, MS
    Guild's Grocery BBQ Team
    The Grocery Cart
    XL / Small Green Eggs
  • YouTube:  Go here and watch some videos.

    https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=sous+vide+prime+rib

    Spring "YouTube Knows How To Do Everything" Chicken
    Spring Texas USA


  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 6,091
    SV is the Caitlyn Jenner of BBQ
    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,948
    I'd just reverse sear that bad boy and not worry about time in the SV.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • @DMW I understand what you are saying.  I guess that I was looking for that "wow factor" of having it cooked for 24 hours
  • @Photo Egg.  I agree 100%.  my problem is that I am at my sisters house when it is cooking and am nervous about a $200 piece of meat having the temp overshot.
  • @Spring Chicken.  Thanks for the links.
  • @thetrim ; I hope to get that analogy out of my head before I sit down for Christmas dinner.
  • thetrimthetrim Posts: 6,091
    @BUFFALOMOOSE Sorry for going way over the top on that one....


    =======================================
    XL 6/06, Mini 6/12, L 10/12, Mini #2 12/14 MiniMax 3/16
    Tampa Bay, FL
    EIB 6 Oct 95
  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 7,966
    @Photo Egg.  I agree 100%.  my problem is that I am at my sisters house when it is cooking and am nervous about a $200 piece of meat having the temp overshot.
    Friends of friends did this last year and it was perfect...Still not the same great outer flavor from the grill but still very good.

    http://www.cooks.com/recipe/uh6bb7na/perfect-prime-rib-everytime.html

    https://search.yahoo.com/search;_ylt=AmZLXV47SXEUepeo_s5ZOYSbvZx4?p=prime+rib+high+temp+oven+then+shut+off&toggle=1&cop=mss&ei=UTF-8&fr=yfp-t-901&fp=1
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • you have a week left to dry it and slow roast it.  no need for a sear that way
    [social media disclaimer: irony and sarcasm may be used in some or all of user's posts; emoticon usage is intended to indicate moderately jocular social interaction; the comments toward users, their usernames, and the real people (living or dead) that they refer to are not intended to be adversarial in nature; those replying to this user are entering into a tacit agreement that they are real-life or social-media acquaintances and/or have agreed to or tacitly agreed to perpetrate occasional good-natured ribbing between and among themselves and others]

  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,390
    If you will cook it indirect at 200-225 degrees, you will end up with a cross section that approaches that of one that has been SV'd. Also at this low temp, it will spend enough time in the cook chamber to develope a crust very similar to one that has been seared. Kind of the best of both worlds if you will. When it comes to prime rib, the long low and slow over oak is hard to beat. Just my thoughts my friend. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
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  • PhatchrisPhatchris Posts: 1,645
    @SGH approximately how long would it take a 7# roast at 250ish, and is there a need to sear at either the begging or end of the cook... Couple chunks of oak or straight lump? Thanks, haven't done a rib roast in the egg and debating the oven vs egg.
  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,390
    edited December 2015
    @Phatchris ;
    At 7 pounds, you are looking at about 3.5 hours to raise it to 125 degrees internal if running 250 degrees. Give or take a little depending on actual temp and how well you maintain it. As to a sear, if you stay 225 or lower, it will spend so long in the cook chamber that it will develop a crust without searing it. So no, searing is not necessary my friend. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • PhatchrisPhatchris Posts: 1,645
    Thanks, I know this is a BGE forum, but in your honest opinion does a nice PRIME rib roast benefit from the egg, or should I stick it in the oven
  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,390
    Phatchris said:
    Thanks, I know this is a BGE forum, but in your honest opinion does a nice PRIME rib roast benefit from the egg, or should I stick it in the oven
    Brother Phat, my honest opinion is that a prime rib off of the egg or any smoker for that matter is superior to one out of the oven. I like a smoke base on mine. This can not be accomplished (feasibly) in the oven. I cook prime rib over very large amounts of burned down oak and oak chunks. Unless you just do not care for smoke, the egg or smoker is the way to go my friend. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • PhatchrisPhatchris Posts: 1,645
    Thanks and sorry for hijacking the original thread....
  • SGHSGH Posts: 24,390
    Phatchris said:
    Thanks and sorry for hijacking the original thread....
    My pleasure. One last tip if you chose to do the low and slow. You need to keep it low for the duration. You don't want the temp jumping up and down. Why? Prime rib (pound for pound) cooks considerably faster than say clod or brisket (less adipose and connective tissue). Every temp spike will effect the final cross section appearance. It will still taste great but it will lack the coveted "look". For clarity, 200 degrees is near ideal to achieve the perfect cross section. Just thought I would share. 

    Location- Just "this side" of Biloxi, Ms.

    Status- Standing by.

    Arsenal-Just a small wore out and broken down Weber kettle. No other means to cook at all.
    Virtus Junxit Mors Non Separabit
    The greatest barrier against all wisdom, the stronghold against knowledge itself, is the single thought in ones mind, that they already have it all figured out. 
  • RaymontRaymont Posts: 690
    I haven't watched SpringChicken's video yet, but I didn't think you could SV something as thick as a Prime rib roast. Wouldn't it take a very long time for the center to reach temp and pasteurization? I would advise caution...

    Small & Large BGE

    Nashville, TN

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 7,966
    SGH said:
    Phatchris said:
    Thanks, I know this is a BGE forum, but in your honest opinion does a nice PRIME rib roast benefit from the egg, or should I stick it in the oven
    Brother Phat, my honest opinion is that a prime rib off of the egg or any smoker for that matter is superior to one out of the oven. I like a smoke base on mine. This can not be accomplished (feasibly) in the oven. I cook prime rib over very large amounts of burned down oak and oak chunks. Unless you just do not care for smoke, the egg or smoker is the way to go my friend. 
    Even a neutral lump charcoal will add to the flavor with out giving it a noticeable smoked taste over that of an oven. That said, we do form opinions with our eyes before it ever hits our taste buds. A little cherry wood will give such a great color to the roast.
    I did this whole primal at Salado Eggfest over night at 200-225. To me it was cooked at to low of a temp because it did not build a good crust. But the temp gauge might have been off a little as well. Looks kinda small on the XL...

    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 28,817
    edited December 2015
    I received a sous vide for my birthday and want to do a boneless prime rib for Christmas.  My game plan is to trim it and apply equal parts salt, pepper, and granulated garlic and let it sit for an hour.  I would then apply a herb paste and vacuum seal it. I pm'd @DMW for his advice and he pointed me to a link that suggested 5-10 hours but it seems the other forum sous vide cooks shoot for much longer cooking times. Has anyone done a large prime rib sous vide and if so could you please pass on the do's and don'ts of the cook.  I searched the site and nothing came up.  Thanks in advance for any help that you can give and I wish everyone a Merry Christmas.

    I agree with Mr. Crenshaw and sgh. Edit: and Darian too.Something that hasn't been mentioned is that the sous vide won't render as much of the interior fat at lower temps. They served it at my company Christmas party last weekend and a lot of people were making faces eating it. Good rib roast will get overly tender in a sous vide bath too. Low and slow will allow you lots of time to be at your desired temp anyway and it will look rare no matter what temp you get it to.

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • HeavyGHeavyG Posts: 5,036
    Raymont said:
    I haven't watched SpringChicken's video yet, but I didn't think you could SV something as thick as a Prime rib roast. Wouldn't it take a very long time for the center to reach temp and pasteurization? I would advise caution...
    There is essentially an almost zero chance of pathogens being deep in the middle of a piece of whole meat like that so there is no need to worry about killing any "baddies". Pathogens tend to stay on the surfaces of a whole hunk of meat like that and they will be cooked rather quickly.
    Camped out in the (757/804)
  • @HeavyG americans have been trained to fear their food. Despite having the safest and most varied food supply in the world, the general tendency here is to throw it out, overcook, and panic

    there isn't a food sold in this country that isn't safe to eat raw at room temperature after a week in the fridge. But don't bother 'splainin it to Mr. And Mrs. America
    [social media disclaimer: irony and sarcasm may be used in some or all of user's posts; emoticon usage is intended to indicate moderately jocular social interaction; the comments toward users, their usernames, and the real people (living or dead) that they refer to are not intended to be adversarial in nature; those replying to this user are entering into a tacit agreement that they are real-life or social-media acquaintances and/or have agreed to or tacitly agreed to perpetrate occasional good-natured ribbing between and among themselves and others]

  • Photo Egg said:
    For me, the best part of a larger prime rib type cook is the bark and outer crust area of spices and magic from grilling. The caramelization gained from slower roasting can not be duplicated by SV. I would rather sacrifice more medium rare outer edge than cook SV. It's such an easy cook on the Egg and it's soooooo good. 
    I have not cooked any beef with SV that I thought was better than cooking on the Egg or Weber. For me, a quick sear at the end just does not duplicate what chemistry does to the crust on a longer cook on these types of beef. Have not liked any of my SV cooks on fatty meat such as ribeye. Flat iron and flank were better but still not as good cooked 100% on the grill.
    Just my 2 cents.
    Happy Holidays
    I agree with this for the most part, but when it comes to short ribs, the SV cannot be beat.  72 hours and then a sear at 600 gives it a nice outer crust and a pink center that falls apart.  IMO, the SV was created for short ribs
    XLBGE- Napa, CA by way of ATX


  • Except OP ain't talkin about short ribs
    [social media disclaimer: irony and sarcasm may be used in some or all of user's posts; emoticon usage is intended to indicate moderately jocular social interaction; the comments toward users, their usernames, and the real people (living or dead) that they refer to are not intended to be adversarial in nature; those replying to this user are entering into a tacit agreement that they are real-life or social-media acquaintances and/or have agreed to or tacitly agreed to perpetrate occasional good-natured ribbing between and among themselves and others]

  • Photo EggPhoto Egg Posts: 7,966
    hoofaloos said:
    Photo Egg said:
    For me, the best part of a larger prime rib type cook is the bark and outer crust area of spices and magic from grilling. The caramelization gained from slower roasting can not be duplicated by SV. I would rather sacrifice more medium rare outer edge than cook SV. It's such an easy cook on the Egg and it's soooooo good. 
    I have not cooked any beef with SV that I thought was better than cooking on the Egg or Weber. For me, a quick sear at the end just does not duplicate what chemistry does to the crust on a longer cook on these types of beef. Have not liked any of my SV cooks on fatty meat such as ribeye. Flat iron and flank were better but still not as good cooked 100% on the grill.
    Just my 2 cents.
    Happy Holidays
    I agree with this for the most part, but when it comes to short ribs, the SV cannot be beat.  72 hours and then a sear at 600 gives it a nice outer crust and a pink center that falls apart.  IMO, the SV was created for short ribs
    I have not tried short ribs with my SV, but I have seen many great posts.
    I have had them SV at a couple top restraunts and they were good but not as good as slow cooked full sized beef ribs from a good Texas BBQ joint nor Frank from Conroe Texas. Different, but not better in my opinion.
    Thank you,
    Darian

    Galveston Texas
  • I agree with others who suggest a sear is not needed for a prime rib. A lower temp will give you more consistent temp/color throughout. Unlike some, I don't particularly care for a smokey prime rib.
    Stillwater, MN
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