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1st Pizza - couldn't get enough heat

DaveEGG
DaveEGG Posts: 16
I had a hard time getting my BGE up to the 700 target range for my first pizza last night and don't know why.  I stirred the coal before lighting and cleaned ash out of the lower pit to improve airflow.  The pizza tasted good but I could use any suggestions on getting the temp up.


Comments

  • TexanOfTheNorth
    TexanOfTheNorth Posts: 3,951
    First, are you sure you want to cook at 700*? Not all doughs are meant for that high of a temp.

    Regarding heat...

    - Are you sure that your fire box is properly aligned with the front of the egg?
    - How much lump did you have in the fire box? Sounds like you may have been using some leftover from previous cook(s).
    - If you were using previously used lump are you sure that it was dry?

    One other suggestion... I like to raise my pies up as high in the dome as possible when doing pizza so that the top can benefit from the radiant heat off of the dome; before the crust can get burned.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • DaveEGG
    DaveEGG Posts: 16
    TexanOfTheNorth, thanks and to be honest, I'm not sure what I want.  The 700 degree goal came from something I read online.  Also, I read not to add too much coal for high heat since it could cut air flow.  The firebox is, I believe, aligned with the front of the egg. 
  • TexanOfTheNorth
    TexanOfTheNorth Posts: 3,951
    Ok, not sure where you read about too much lump being bad for high heat/air flow. You may want to make sure that you don't have a lot of really small pieces on the bottom but, I'd fill at least to the top of the fire box and even as high as the top of the fire ring.

    I suspect that a lack of fuel is what prevented you from getting the temp you wanted. Especially if you were working with residual lump.

    The important thing is to get back up on the horse! I'm sure your next attempt will go more like you intend!
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • jtcBoynton
    jtcBoynton Posts: 2,814
    The daisy wheel was off the egg, correct?  Anytime I cook over 400º, I remove the daisy wheel.

    Make sure the dough recipe was designed for 700º temps.  Good dough recipes will provide a recommended cooking temp. A lot of the recipes you find are best suited for being cooked at 450º - 550º. 
    Southeast Florida - LBGE
    In cooking, often we implement steps for which we have no explanations other than ‘that’s what everybody else does’ or ‘that’s what I have been told.’  Dare to think for yourself.
     
  • RiverDoc
    RiverDoc Posts: 572
    funny you bring this up. I have a friend who says his egg won't go over 400° with a platesetter. Last night we had their family over for pizza. I've been cooking my pizzas around 550ish, but last night I cleaned my egg loaded new lump and I filled it up. I went to prep a pizza and when I came back out it was above 700°, quickly damperd and lowered. The only thing I do different from his was I cleaned mine with a shop vac, and lump (I use RW). I'm not sure if different lumps burn at different temps, but I would clean it good, DFMT off and try again. The great part is you still get pizza! Good luck
    -Todd
    Franklin N.C. LBGE and a SBGE
  • Skiddymarker
    Skiddymarker Posts: 8,522
    From the pic, looks like the stone is on the setter, legs down. I prefer to go legs up with a grid on the setter legs, some spacers to raise the stone an inch or two (copper tees, fire bricks, egg feet, etc...) then the stone. Bottom line, if you go legs down, make sure there is an air space between the stone and the setter. Higher in the dome, better topping browning. 
    For pizza I like fresh lump on the bottom, residual if there is any on the top.
    Delta B.C. - Whiskey and steak, because no good story ever started with someone having a salad!
  • RiverDoc
    RiverDoc Posts: 572
    +1 @Skiddymarker I up also go legs up grate then stone. I haven't tried raising the stone up higher though... Guess that's next
    -Todd
    Franklin N.C. LBGE and a SBGE
  • DaveEGG
    DaveEGG Posts: 16
    Thanks for all the good advice, everyone.  As I said to my wife last night, the first pizza was good.  Now on to great. Today, by the way, pulled pork and baby backs.  We should have gotten the BGE years ago! 
  • TexanOfTheNorth
    TexanOfTheNorth Posts: 3,951
    I also agree with @Skiddymarker re: setup. That was not the reason for your temp issue. I know he did not say it was I just wanted to mention it.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • Skiddymarker
    Skiddymarker Posts: 8,522
    I also agree with @Skiddymarker re: setup. That was not the reason for your temp issue. I know he did not say it was I just wanted to mention it.
    Thanks TOTN for diplomatically telling me to give my head a shake, I need it - at my age I often forget the initial question.......
    For high temps like pizza cooks, I like 2nd burn lump on the top and new stuff underneath, fast to light and quick to clear VOCs. 
    Delta B.C. - Whiskey and steak, because no good story ever started with someone having a salad!
  • TexanOfTheNorth
    TexanOfTheNorth Posts: 3,951
    I also agree with @Skiddymarker re: setup. That was not the reason for your temp issue. I know he did not say it was I just wanted to mention it.
    Thanks TOTN for diplomatically telling me to give my head a shake, I need it - at my age I often forget the initial question.......
    For high temps like pizza cooks, I like 2nd burn lump on the top and new stuff underneath, fast to light and quick to clear VOCs. 
    @Skiddymarker, honestly, I had no such intention. You made an excellent observation regarding setup; from which I am sure @Daveegg will benefit. I just did not want him to conclude that his setup had anything to do with his temp issue.
    ---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
    Well, "spa-Peggy" is kind of like spaghetti. I'm not sure what Peggy does different, if anything. But it's the one dish she's kind of made her own.
    ____________________
    Aurora, Ontario, Canada
  • whoa, that is a whole lot of corn meal. Real clay pizza ovens frequently run in the 1000 degrees plus range, so 700 is a good temp for an Italian style thin crust with good flour. Always use all trumps flour if available. Some folks swear by double zero, but all trumps is best for pizza. For an American style pizza, 450 to 550 degrees is what you will most often see a restaurant brick oven set to.
  • LDR
    LDR Posts: 414
    Tonight, I finally gave pizza a second try.  I initially did it a year ago and it was a disaster. I also ran around 700 my first cook.  Tonight I ran at 550, and will probably go 500-525 next time.  It was much better (actually edible this time).  I had the adjustable rig with the extender on top and then pizza stone on top of that.  I probably can't raise the stone any higher and still shut the lid.