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Rustic Sourdough

It all starts with a recently fed active starter- image the dough- 260g starter, 400g bread flour, 60g whole wheat flour, 30g rye flour, 13g salt, 292g water (makes one nice size loaf or boule) image shaped- image After about 40 minutes at 500* (with a pan of water for steam for the first 15) image image
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Comments

  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 818
    Looks good enough to eat.

    Gerhard
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  • I wish I was allowed to eat more bread.  That looks delicious.
    Pasquali Luciano
    Buon appetito to all the BGE family
    XLBGE, LBGE, MBGE and lots of toys

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  • SkinnyVSkinnyV Posts: 2,661
    Beautiful!! The starter your own or purchased?
    Seattle, WA
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  • Thanks! It's a starter I got from a bakery around me...I've had for a yearand a half now....the bakery's is/was over 15 years old
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  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,280
    Dang MQ I'd nom down on that with some herbed olive oil like there was no tomorrow. Looks great!
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  • thanks tard...I make a jalapeño infused olive oil that we chowed some of this bread with...along with some cold smoked gouda...good eats.
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  • U_tardedU_tarded Posts: 1,280

    thanks tard...I make a jalapeño infused olive oil that we chowed some of this bread with...along with some cold smoked gouda...good eats.

    Nice!
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  • Quinn that looks great. Wonder how hard it would be to start some starter? I love sourdough
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
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  • DMurfDMurf Posts: 481
    @SmokinDAWG82 I use a no knead recipe that I got on the net, it can stay in the fridge for up to two weeks pull off a hung and bake up some bread. The great thing is that when the bowl is empty you just start another batch in the same bowl, DO NOT CLEAN IT OUT. The rags that are left become a starter of sorts flavoring your next loaves. You don't get the awesome tang that a true sourdough has but it is very good and easy to make.
    David
    BBQ since 2010 - Oh my, what I was missing.
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  • gerhardkgerhardk Posts: 818
    Dawg it is not really that hard to make a starter, google will find you many how to pages.  I bought starter culture from http://www.northwestsourdough.com/store/   Buying an existing culture practically guarantees that you will have a viable starter.  Another place that offers a sourdough culture is King Arthur flours, their culture apparently dates back a couple of hundred years.  http://search.kingarthurflour.com/search?w=sourdough starter&af=type:products

    Gerhard
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  • Thanks guys, I'm going to order some from KA and see where that takes me
    LBGE
    Go Dawgs! - Marietta, GA
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  • GriffinGriffin Posts: 6,926
    Beautiful, simply beautiful.

    Richardson, Texas

    Griffin's Grub or you can find me on Facebook

    The Supreme Potentate, Sovereign Commander and Sultan of Wings

     

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  • Quinn, Great looking bread, nice cook as always.


    Delta B.C. - Vee-Gan: old Indian word for poor hunter. 
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  • sweet loaf. gorgeous crust. I have been making sourdough for about a year now. I got my starter from KA and I use or feed it once a week.

    I am surprised by the temp and time on this recipe. Mine is between 25-30 minutes at 425. However, I only use bread flour. 

    Do you do yours on the egg every time? I am eager to add in some whole grain flours if I get results like that :)
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  • I noticed no instant yeast...how long to you let this rise?
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  • Thanks all!

    Jimreed777-- don't know why the time and temp difference between us...my loaf might be bigger...my recipe makes a pretty good size one. I make a single or double batch of this weekly and use the egg half the time I would guess...it pretty much depends on if anything else planned for egg that day.

    This was a 36 hour cold ferment to give you an idea of rise time...if I'm not using commercial yeast (which when using my starter I really never do) I always give it at least 24 hours up to 4 or 5 days...
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  • Bread looks incredible.  Love the sourdough.  Gonna try the KA starter.  Bookmarked this thread.  Thanks for sharing.

    Damascus, VA.  Friendliest town on the Appalachian Trail.

    LBGE Aug 2012, SBGE Feb 2014

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  • Thanks all! Jimreed777-- don't know why the time and temp difference between us...my loaf might be bigger...my recipe makes a pretty good size one. I make a single or double batch of this weekly and use the egg half the time I would guess...it pretty much depends on if anything else planned for egg that day. This was a 36 hour cold ferment to give you an idea of rise time...if I'm not using commercial yeast (which when using my starter I really never do) I always give it at least 24 hours up to 4 or 5 days...
    So you do pretty much what I do on my pizza dough recipe - that helps. Thanks. Do you let it sit at room temp when you pull from fridge for 90 minutes or so to proof a little more before popping it in the oven?

    Thanks - I look forward to trying this out.

    and also...your loaf is not bigger :)
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  • Lol...I was waiting that comment. On baking day I pull from fridge in the morning and let it sit in the container most of the day, then I shape and let proof for 30-60 minutes..basically until it feels right, which for me is when you poke the loaf and the indentation doesn't spring right back out.
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  • Thanks for the follow up. Asked for wheat and rye flour from the shopper in the family. I am eager for a change of pace.

    In the meantime, I am gonna try this one with just bread flour and see what I get.

    ever have success with a gluten-free (taste-free :)  )bread? 
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  • I've never tried to do a gluten free bread so I can't be of any help here...

    It seems like you have some bread experience so you should know that you'll probably need to adjust the water amount ( not sure which way) because of the different amounts the different types of flour can absorb if you go with all bread flour. Also, our starters could be hydrated differently so you'll want to account for that too....and I'm baking at over 6000' so there's a difference there as well... Basically, just use my recipe as a guide and go by feel if you can ;)
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  • CigarSmokinEggerCigarSmokinEgger Posts: 213
    edited February 2013

    GREAT looking bread!  Looks like my routine is very similar to yours; I posted my recent bake here:

    http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/1147890/first-bake-2lb-country-loaf.

    My recipe is a little different though, I'm only using 20% starter where I see you're at close to 60%, I also have a higher hydration, 75% vs 60% but the results look awesome!

    Mark

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  • Mighty_QuinnMighty_Quinn Posts: 1,878
    edited February 2013
    Thanks Mark! I think because I use a much higher starter percentage, my dough feels wetter than your typical 60% hydrated dough. I suspect it feels closer to your 75% hydration. Nice loaves you posted too!
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  • I'm not sure how hydrated my starter is exactly, I never do exact measurements when I feed it... It's pretty soupy though... Like pancake batter, not doughy at all.
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  • CigarSmokinEggerCigarSmokinEgger Posts: 213
    edited February 2013

    Thanks and that sounds right about the starter.  I know mine is 100% hydrated as I measure when I feed and it's very thick, so you're probably right about the overall hydration.  I love making bread, so much better and cheaper than store bought stuff!

    Also forgot to mention that I'm coking in a Lodge cast iron combo cooker for the first 20 minutes, really retains the moisture and it's amazing the amount of steam released when I remove the top.

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  • I sort of take back my exact measurement comment...I do measure when I feed the starter... just the volume though, not weight...a cup of flour to a cup of water.

    Agree on homemade bread. I've been doing it for a while now...
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  • Mighty Quinn... That loaf is beautiful! I'm 61 and have never baked bread in my life, until I got my big green egg. I got online with the people at King Arthur Flour and they help me learn to make and knead dough. I got it ready fire up my BGE and it came out perfect. I even went out and bought a Kitchen Aid stand mixer last weekend. I've order the sourdough stater from KAF and I hope I can make a beautiful loaf like your's someday.
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  • Start your own Sourdough Starter




    The easiest and most successful method of making your own starter is to combine water, flour, and a tablespoon (or packet) of active dry "domestic" yeast which is available at any grocery store. By letting this brew sit for several days as you would with a dried sourdough starter, the domestic yeast will go "wild" and develop the familiar tang of its truly wild cousins. You'll probably catch some wild yeast in the process as well.2 cups warm water
    1 tablespoon of sugar or honey (optional)
    1 tablespoon or packet active dry yeast
    2 cups King Arthur Unbleached All-Purpose Flour
    Pour the water into a 3- to 4-quart glass or ceramic container or bowl, and add dissolve the sugar or honey and the yeast in that order. Stir in the flour gradually. Cover the jar or bowl with a clean dishcloth and place it somewhere warm. By using a dishcloth instead of plastic wrap, you'll allow any wild yeast in the area to infiltrate and begin to work with the domestic yeast which itself is beginning to develop "wild" characteristics and flavors.

    The mixture will begin to bubble and brew almost immediately. Let it work anywhere from 2 to 5 days, stirring it about once a day as it will separate. When the bubbling has subsided and a yeasty, sour aroma has developed, stir your starter once more and refrigerate it until you are ready to use it. The starter should have the consistency of pancake batter.
     
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  • Clay QClay Q Posts: 4,418
    Oooooo yeah!  That sourdough looks might nice!   Thanks for sharing your recipe, I'm impressed.
    Now if it ever stops snowing outside... thinking Wednesday will be baking day. 
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  • HogHeavenHogHeaven Posts: 264
    I bought a sourdough starter from King Arthur Flour a month ago... I'm 61 and retired. Never cooked, baked bread in my life. But... If the Egg can do it, I can do it. Why not, I'm retired!
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