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Pizza Crust - Burnt

Did 4 pizzas this weekend. All 4 were good except 2 had burned crust. After researching, best I can tell is I need better control how hot my pizza stone gets based on how long it sits in the egg before adding the pie. Also, with multi pies, I need to wipe down with a wet rag between pies to help reduce the stone temp. Any other thoughts? My setup was AR with a stone on the spider and my pizza stone on the top grate. Dome temp was 450 - 600 as I cooked pies over 2 days. Appreciate any input. Thanks.
Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat

Comments

  • D_TrainD_Train Posts: 46
    How long did they cook for and at what temp? Any sugar or oil in the crust? How long did the stone preheat for? What I've found works for me is to get the stone high in the dome. I use a plate setter but the AR shouldn't be much different. I use the PS legs up, then grid, then 3 firebricks on grid laid on edge to make a triangle, and then finally the BGE pizza stone on the firebricks. 600 degree pizzas at 5-6 minutes for NY style or 750 degrees at 3 minutes for Neapolitan style. No sugar. Flour water salt yeast only.
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,105
    Not sure the exact time but I was spinning the pies at 4 mins. Then maybe another 4. Very clear the bottoms were done before the tops On the dough, no clue. Picked up dough balls at Publix. Will make my own next time. With my AR, the stone was as high as it could go. Stone was in the egg for at least 45 mins. Guess it was just too hot.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • tcampbelltcampbell Posts: 646
    Cooked two last night in small egg plate setter then grate then stone.Cooked first one 8 minutes at about 600 it was great.Next one 8 minutes at what I thought was same temp and crust was burnt bad.
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,105
    Yep. I think you need to remove the stone and cool it down between pies. Read on the Whiz's site about wiping with a damp cloth. I'm going to use my IR thermometer to get temp readings on my stone next time.
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • We did 5 this weekend right at about 700 for 5-7mins each.   I do have the Kamado Joe heat deflector and pizza stone and used them both stacked on top of each other.  I figured it would help to keep the bottoms from burning.  We didn't remove them or wipe them with a damp cloth between pies either. I have tried the Publix dough in the oven before, but did not like it very much.  You may want to give this recipe a try this next time.  It's easy to make and work with. 



  • I suspect the Publix dough has sugar in it, so it can easily burn if the temp is over 550.
    If the world is something you accept rather than interpret, then you're susceptible to the influence of charismatic idiots.

    In Durham, NC, where I'm kicking ass every day, even without a basket.  
  • D_TrainD_Train Posts: 46
    If you get the setup right there will be no need to remove the stone or cool it down. Like I said what works for me is PS legs up, grid, 3 firebricks on edge to make a triangle, pizza stone. I suspect that the extra mass of the firebricks probably helps neutralize the heat, and being high in the dome ensures that the top cooks nicely. It took me a handful of over/under cooked crusts to find this setup. Maybe this is one of those things where you have to pay your dues before finding the neutral point, but I'm pretty well convinced that cooling down the stone in between pizzas shouldn't have to be part of the equation.
  • MaskedMarvelMaskedMarvel Posts: 1,371
    Best advice I got on pizza was from Fred: less toppings.
    Large BGE -- Greensboro!


  • Little StevenLittle Steven Posts: 27,408
    Try going with the indirect piece on top of the AR then four or five half inch copper tees then the pizza stone. I have a little trouble understanding how many BTUs a wipe with a damp cloth will absorb. :-B

    Steve 

    Caledon, ON

     

  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,551
    edited January 2014
    First of all, my setup is exactly like D_Train other than that I use flower pots rather than fire bricks to raise the stone.  

    I think your stone is too hot for your crust.  I make my own crust with AP Flour, and try to keep my stone 500 or less.  I have never burned a crust or had under done toppings.  Takes about 10 minutes for a pie, but that is fast enough for me.

    Also, cooking a pizza actually reduces the temp of the stone where it sits.  Here is a thermal image of my stone at the start of a cook, and another after cooking 5 pies. You can see where the pizza was is cooler, and that the temp at the edges is hotter than the  "za zone".

    Note these pics are from my first pizza cook, before I learned to raise the stone.  My fire was also a bit too small, and was cooling by the end of the cook, though the pies were all excellent!
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • 4Runner4Runner Posts: 2,105
    Ok. I'm going to make my own dough. Again, spider with a stone plus my AR with my pizza stone up top and you all are saying I should be able run 500 plus and not burn my crust?
    Joe - I'm a reformed gasser-holic aka 4Runner Columbia, SC Wonderful BGE Resource Site: http://www.nakedwhiz.com/ceramicfaq.htm and http://www.nibblemethis.com/  and http://playingwithfireandsmoke.blogspot.com/2006/02/recipes.html
    What am I drinking now?   Woodford....neat
  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,551
    The temp your crust blackens at is partly a function of the flour you use. I only have experience using all purpose flour. I know you are good at 500, cannot speak to higher temps or other flours. Read some other pizza posts for dough recipes and cook temps. Good luck!
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
  • Hungry JoeHungry Joe Posts: 1,186

    The folks above that mentioned, different dough's cook better at different temperatures are correct. When you make your own dough use a stone temperature that is called for in the recipe.

    I have had consistently good results with this recipe, it comes out good in the 550-600 degree range :

    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/10/new-york-style-pizza.html

    I've never had to wipe a stone down to cool it but I have had to wait and get the temperature up when doing more then two pies. A cheap inferred thermometer from Harbor Freight can be your friend doing pizza.

    Keep your eyes peeled for this one to go on sale for about $25 or less which happens a lot. I got it for $22 with a 20% off coupon.

    http://www.harborfreight.com/non-contact-infrared-thermometer-with-laser-targeting-69465-8905.html


  • CookinbobCookinbob Posts: 1,551
    edited January 2014

    The folks above that mentioned, different dough's cook better at different temperatures are correct. When you make your own dough use a stone temperature that is called for in the recipe.

    I have had consistently good results with this recipe, it comes out good in the 550-600 degree range :

    http://www.seriouseats.com/recipes/2010/10/new-york-style-pizza.html


    This is one of two recipes I use, the other is from Artisan Bread in 5 and is posted as a PDF in this thread  http://eggheadforum.com/discussion/comment/1449325/#Comment_1449325.

    Again, I have never tried to cook above 500 deg, it is only since I had the Egg that it has been an option.
    XLBGE, Small BGE, Homebrew and Guitars
    Rochester, NY
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